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What a Typical Day Is Like for Introverts

What a Typical Day Is Like for Introverts

Hearing the word introvert probably conjures up a person who is shy and not willing to interact with people; however, being an introvert and being shy are two separate personality traits. While some people can be both, many introverts just find a sense of peace being in their own company and indulging in lone pursuits away from others. This doesn’t mean they hate being around people; it just means they need less time in the presence of others.

There are many positive ways introverts contribute to the world around them — they are good observers, and are trustworthy, focused, and thought-provoking. In essence, introverts may come across as shy and reticent but they are just predominantly concerned with their own thoughts and feelings rather than external things.

A typical day for an introvert will vary, but the core inner feelings transcend throughout each day and can shape interaction with others and their choices of activities.

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A Day in the Life of an Introvert

7:00 a.m. — You go for a run.

You enjoy activities by yourself, so going for a run alone is no bother. Putting in your music and setting out for your morning workout is an excellent time to start the day and get your thoughts in check. Introverts are deep thinkers, so a good workout is not only a good opportunity to think about the day ahead, but it’s also a great opportunity to clear the mind of unneeded thoughts that are cluttering your brain.

8:30 a.m. — You enjoy reading your book on the commute to work.

Introverts love being in their own little world and reading is the perfect way to do this. It’s also a way of shutting out anyone around you — not because you are trying to be rude, but because you just enjoy the mindfulness and comfort of being immersed in your book with no distractions.

9:00 a.m. — You notice your co-worker’s new haircut.

Being an introvert, you are very good at making observations, and you are often the first to notice something different like a colleague’s new hair cut or new outfit. This is why introverts can sometimes be recognized as being thoughtful. Being observant also means you pick up on conversations and any awkward moments even if you aren’t involved in the conversation itself.

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12:00 p.m. — You become absorbed in your work.

Time can often fly when you’re an introvert because you get very immersed in whatever you’re doing. You have a knack of focusing well on anything you put your mind to. Introverts tend to be driven and disciplined and can direct their energy well into a project or a goal, especially if it’s something they’re passionate about.

1:00 p.m. — You go out for work lunch but leave earlier than others.

You go out for lunch and enjoy the break with colleagues and friends, but you are more likely to leave lunch much earlier than the others especially if lunch extends longer than usual. This isn’t because you’re trying to be rude or hate the people you’re with, but introverts need a certain amount of time away from people to recuperate mentally. Sometimes being in the company of others can be a bit too much especially if there are dominating personalities around you.

5:00 p.m. — You get invited out for drinks but decline.

The thought of being in a large group and socializing can be okay for an introvert for a certain amount of time, but after a while it can become boring to them. The common notion that being by yourself is lonely and boring without interaction with others is the complete opposite for an introvert. Many people find this hard to understand, but if you’re an introvert, you know exactly what I mean! Because of this, many invitations are declined or plans can be cancelled at the last minute in favor of staying in and enjoying your own company.

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5:15 p.m. — A stranger on the bus makes small talk — and you hate it.

There you are happily reading your book with an empty seat next to you, when someone decides to sit down despite there being numerous other seats they could have chosen. This annoys you a bit but what can you do? However, the person then starts asking you about your book and the dread sets in. You absolutely hate small talk and never know what to say or how to carry on the conversation — the awkwardness ruins your journey and you’re annoyed you didn’t get to finish that last page of the chapter before your bus stop approaches.

5:30 p.m. — You’re happy to be home.

As an introvert, you love being home. Home to you is your safe place and the place where you can truly relax and unwind. This is why you’d secretly love to be able to have a job where you can work from home and just be surrounded by your comforts.

6:00 p.m. — Your friend calls.

You love your friends, and just because you decline invitations and cancel plans sometimes doesn’t mean you don’t love having people in your life. As an introvert, you are more likely to have a small, close circle of friends rather than hundreds of acquaintances that demand your time. You love having interaction with your close friends, but they are the ones who are more likely to call you or initiate a conversation because you can find it hard to muster up the need to call, but this doesn’t mean you love them any less.

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7:30 p.m. — You take your dog for a walk.

Introverts — whether single, in a relationship, or married with a family — love to spend time with their pets. This is because animals don’t talk and just keep you company in a silent and non-judgmental way. You sometimes think you relate more to animals than people — or at least like the quiet company more. Having a pet like a dog is a good excuse to take yourself out of situations with people and be by yourself by taking them for a nice, quiet, reflective walk.

Featured photo credit: Reading by Alexander Lyubavin via flickr.com

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Jenny Marchal

Freelance Writer

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Last Updated on February 13, 2019

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

Think being happy is something that happens as a result of luck, circumstance, having money, etc.? Think again.

Happiness is a mindset. And if you’re looking to improve your ability to find happiness, then check out these 10 things happy people do differently.

Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions. -Dalai Lama

1. Happy people find balance in their lives.

Folks who are happy have this in common: they’re content with what they have, and don’t waste a whole lot of time worrying and stressing over things they don’t. Unhappy people do the opposite: they spend too much time thinking about what they don’t have. Happy people lead balanced lives. This means they make time for all the things that are important to them, whether it’s family, friends, career, health, religion, etc.

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2. Happy people abide by the golden rule.

You know that saying you heard when you were a kid, “Do unto others as you would have them do to you.” Well, happy people truly embody this principle. They treat others with respect. They’re sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of other people. They’re compassionate. And they get treated this way (most of the time) in return.

3. Happy people don’t sweat the small stuff.

One of the biggest things happy people do differently compared to unhappy people is they let stuff go. Bad things happen to good people sometimes. Happy people realize this, are able to take things in stride, and move on. Unhappy people tend to dwell on minor inconveniences and issues, which can perpetuate feelings of sadness, guilt, resentment, greed, and anger.

4. Happy people take responsibility for their actions.

Happy people aren’t perfect, and they’re well aware of that. When they screw up, they admit it. They recognize their faults and work to improve on them. Unhappy people tend to blame others and always find an excuse why things aren’t going their way. Happy people, on the other hand, live by the mantra:

“There are two types of people in the world: those that do and those that make excuses why they don’t.”

5. Happy people surround themselves with other happy people.

happiness surrounding

    One defining characteristic of happy people is they tend to hang out with other happy people. Misery loves company, and unhappy people gravitate toward others who share their negative sentiments. If you’re struggling with a bout of sadness, depression, worry, or anger, spend more time with your happiest friends or family members. Chances are, you’ll find that their positive attitude rubs off on you.

    6. Happy people are honest with themselves and others.

    People who are happy often exhibit the virtues of honesty and trustworthiness. They would rather give you candid feedback, even when the truth hurts, and they expect the same in return. Happy people respect people who give them an honest opinion.

    7. Happy people show signs of happiness.

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    smile

      This one may sound obvious but it’s a key differentiator between happy and unhappy people. Think about your happiest friends. Chances are, the mental image you form is of them smiling, laughing, and appearing genuinely happy. On the flip side, those who aren’t happy tend to look the part. Their posture may be slouched and you may perceive a lack of confidence.

      8. Happy people are passionate.

      Another thing happy people have in common is their ability to find their passions in life and pursue those passions to the fullest. Happy people have found what they’re looking for, and they spend their time doing what they love.

      9. Happy people see challenges as opportunities.

      Folks who are happy accept challenges and use them as opportunities to learn and grow. They turn negatives into positives and make the best out of seemingly bad situations. They don’t dwell on things that are out of their control; rather, they seek solutions and creative ways of overcoming obstacles.

      10. Happy people live in the present.

      While unhappy people tend to dwell on the past and worry about the future, happy people live in the moment. They are grateful for “the now” and focus their efforts on living life to the fullest in the present. Their philosophy is:

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      There’s a reason it’s called “the present.” Because life is a gift.

      So if you’d like to bring a little more happiness into your life, think about the 10 principles above and how you can use them to make yourself better.

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