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5 Early Learning Toys To Help Aid Your Child’s Development

5 Early Learning Toys To Help Aid Your Child’s Development

The joys of parenthood are vastly improved once your child begins to show signs of learning development. It is at this point that your baby’s character starts to shine through and as a parent you will naturally look to ways to help them discover more about the world. Toys are crucial to this aspect of their learning, therefore it’s also important to know which types will stimulate them intellectually and emotionally.

1. Shape Sorters

Shape sorters are categorized as a traditional toy that offers the classic fun challenge for young children and toddlers. By figuring out how to drop an item into its appropriately shaped hole, your child begins to classify and assign names to shapes, which can be best seen in most children around the 24-month mark.

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But before that point, your child will be learning to develop their hand-eye coordination and problem-solving skills through the assorting and assembling of shapes into their correct holes.

Shape sorting can be practiced at home with everyday objects found in the kitchen, such as food-containers and Tupperware. Small, soft items that will easily fit into the containers can be prepared in piles for your child to play with. As they do so, say their names so your child can become familiar with the objects and the process.

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2. Building Blocks

Building blocks have never ceased to go out of fashion for young children and toddlers due to their raw capacity to provide a rich learning and development system about colours and symmetry, which increases their motor skills at a young age.

Whilst a toddler will be of a too young age to appreciate the interlocking mechanism of building blocks such as Lego or Duplo, the wooden equivalent is better suited for this stage of their development. Aside from enhancing their motor skills, your child will also increase hand-eye coordination, spatial skills, and lateral thinking.

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3. Soft Toys

Soft or cuddly toys should be carefully chosen for durability and safety up until your child reaches two to three. Your toddler will be exploring their learning empathy as well as language and names, so the introduction of a stuffed bear or doll is a welcome addition as a learning tool. Buying a traditional children’s soft toy will allow them to recognize familiar words like cat, dog, bear, and rabbit, which they will later pick up on when in school. Having your child name their own stuffed animal will see them build an emotional connection with each toy, and for every new item they collect. As a new companion, your child’s soft toy will be an experiment for parenting skills in that your child will be encouraged to treat it as their own pet or loved one; to feed it, change its diapers, put it to bed, and so on. By practicing these types of parenting routines on a continual basis, your child will learn to understand the importance of caring and being responsible for others. A child never forgets their first true stuffed animal friend.

4. Picture Books

Picture books are a universally recognized tool for teaching the concept of cause and effect to young children and toddlers. As you go through the process of reading a picture book to your child, invite them to listen out for ‘trigger’ words such as because, so, if, then, as a result of. Picture books also generate awareness of a child’s story sense. They can begin to differentiate one part of a story from the next, hence a beginning and ‘the end’.

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Picture books create greater interaction between a parent and their child, which in turn parents builds reading comprehension. The nature of the toy encourages the young reader to talk about what they see on each page, so your role as the teacher should present them with opportunities to discuss what happened in each part of the story, and to ask about the characters involved throughout.

5. Activity Toys

As your toddler grows in strength you may expect them to want to spend more time being active and find confidence in their ability to move around unsupervised. You can encourage this aspect of their development by introducing them to toys that test their physical and mental skills, such as bouncy balls, tricycles or three-wheeled scooters. The greater the challenge is for them to conquer, the faster they will grow to find a solution using basic problem solving ability.

Whether you are a first-time parent, or are looking for new ideas to help your young child improve their learning ability, these tips should pave the way for your own methods of teaching.

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Tom Willis

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Published on January 30, 2019

How to Support a Working Mother as a Working Father

How to Support a Working Mother as a Working Father

In roughly 60 percent of two-parent households with children under the age of 18, both parents work full time. But who takes time off work when the kids are sick in your house? And if you are a manager, how do you react when a man says he needs time to take his baby to the pediatrician?

The sad truth is, the default in many companies and families is to value the man’s work over the woman’s—even when there is no significant difference in their professional obligations or compensation. This translates into stereotypes in the workplace that women are the primary caregivers, which can negatively impact women’s success on the job and their upward mobility.

According to a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term time-use data (1965–2011), fathers in dual-income couples devote significantly less time than mothers do to child care.[1] Dads are doing more than twice as much housework as they used to (from an average of about four hours per week to about 10 hours), but there is still a significant imbalance.

This is not just an issue between spouses; it’s a workplace culture issue. In many offices, it is still taboo for dads to openly express that they have family obligations that need their attention. In contrast, the assumption that moms will be on the front lines of any family crisis is one that runs deep.

Consider an example from my company. A few years back, one of our team members joined us for an off-site meeting soon after returning from maternity leave. Not even two hours into her trip, her husband called to say that the baby had been crying nonstop. While there was little our colleague could practically do to help with the situation, this call was clearly unsettling, and the result was that her attention was divided for the rest of an important business dinner.

This was her first night away since the baby’s birth, and I know that her spouse had already been on several business trips before this event. Yet, I doubt she called him during his conferences to ask child-care questions. Like so many moms everywhere, she was expected to figure things out on her own.

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The numbers show that this story is far from the exception. In another Pew survey, 47 percent of dual-income parents agreed that the moms take on more of the work when a child gets sick.[2] In addition, 39 percent of working mothers said they had taken a significant amount of time off from work to care for their child compared to just 24 percent of working fathers. Mothers are also more likely than fathers (27 percent to 10 percent) to say they had quit their job at some point for family reasons.

Before any amazing stay-at-home-dads post an angry rebuttal comment, I want to be very clear that I am not judging how families choose to divide and conquer their personal and professional responsibilities; that’s 100 percent their prerogative. Rather, I am taking aim at the culture of inequity that persists even when spouses have similar or identical professional responsibilities. This is an important issue for all of us because we are leaving untapped business and human potential on the table.

What’s more, I think my fellow men can do a lot about this. For those out there who still privately think that being a good dad just means helping out mom, it’s time to man up. Stop expecting working partners—who have similar professional responsibilities—to bear the majority of the child-care responsibilities as well.

Consider these ways to support your working spouse:

1. Have higher expectations for yourself as a father; you are a parent, not a babysitter.

Know who your pediatrician is and how to reach him or her. Have a back-up plan for transportation and emergency coverage.

Don’t simply expect your partner to manage all these invisible tasks on her own. Parenting takes effort and preparation for the unexpected.

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As in other areas of life, the way to build confidence is to learn by doing. Moms aren’t born knowing how to do this stuff any more than dads are.

2. Treat your partner the way you’d want to be treated.

I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve heard a man on a business trip say to his wife on a call something to the effect of, “I am in the middle of a meeting. What do you want me to do about it?”

However, when the tables are turned, men often make that same call at the first sign of trouble.

Distractions like this make it difficult to focus and engage with work, which perpetuates the stereotype that working moms aren’t sufficiently committed.

When you’re in charge of the kids, do what she would do: Figure it out.

3. When you need to take care of your kids, don’t make an excuse that revolves around your partner’s availability.

This implies that the children are her first priority and your second.

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I admit I have been guilty in the past of telling clients, “I have the kids today because my wife had something she could not move.” What I should have said was, “I’m taking care of my kids today.”

Why is it so hard for men to admit they have personal responsibilities? Remember that you are setting an example for your sons and daughters, and do the right thing.

4. As a manager, be supportive of both your male and female colleagues when unexpected situations arise at home.

No one likes or wants disruptions, but life happens, and everyone will face a day when the troubling phone call comes from his sitter, her school nurse, or even elderly parents.

Accommodating personal needs is not a sign of weakness as a leader. Employees will be more likely to do great work if they know that you care about their personal obligations and family—and show them that you care about your own.

5. Don’t keep score or track time.

At home, it’s juvenile to get into debates about who last changed a diaper or did the dishes; everyone needs to contribute, but the big picture is what matters. Is everyone healthy and getting enough sleep? Are you enjoying each other’s company?

In business, too, avoid the trap of punching a clock. The focus should be on outcomes and performance rather than effort and inputs. That’s the way to maintain momentum toward overall goals.

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The Bottom Line

To be clear, I recognize that a great many working dads are doing a terrific job both on the home front and in their professional lives. My concern is that these standouts often aren’t visible to their colleagues; they intentionally or inadvertently let their work as parents fly under the radar. Dads need to be open and honest about family responsibilities to change perceptions in the workplace.

The question “How do you balance it all?” should not be something that’s just asked of women. Frankly, no one can answer that question. Juggling a career and parental responsibilities is tough. At times, really tough.

But it’s something that more parents should be doing together, as a team. This can be a real bonus for the couple relationship as well, because nothing gets in the way of good partnership faster than feelings of inequity.

On the plus side, I can tell you that parenting skills really do get better with practice—and that’s great for people of both sexes. I think our cultural expectations that women are the “nurturers” and men are the “providers” needs to evolve. Expanding these definitions will open the doors to richer contributions from everyone, because women can and should be both—and so should men.

Featured photo credit: NeONBRAND via unsplash.com

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