Advertising
Advertising

People Who Enjoy Alone Time All Have These 5 Things In Common

People Who Enjoy Alone Time All Have These 5 Things In Common

There is a common thread that ties together many different types of people that enjoy their time alone more than the average. Just because you like being alone doesn’t mean that you don’t have thoughts that flow through your mind and stimulate you. Perhaps you gain greater stimulus from the thoughts you have in solitude. Could it be possible that it’s easier for you to work towards your goals or your thoughts are clearer when you’re alone?

Their happiness stems from internal stimuli

Sometimes it can be difficult for others to understand that you don’t equate attention with validation. You don’t need anyone to give you the inside scoop on what you’re feeling. This doesn’t mean that you don’t require stimulation. In fact, at times you feel that you process stimuli more deeply than your cohorts.

Advertising

Everyone has some sort of energy wellspring that they feed from. Taking the time to connect with the inner you is not so you can appear well adjusted. You do this to access  where your happiness truly lives. If you looked to an outside source for your happiness, as a creature of habit where would you be?

They always seek growth

You don’t mean to be a snob about your activities. You simply want to make the best use of your time possible. Therefore, the conversations you find interesting are the ones that fuel growth. A large part of you is always looking deep inside to make yourself become more. You’re not much for chit chat and that’s okay.

Advertising

It’s as if you feel it’s a part of the duty of mankind to have deeper thoughts. There are enough people concerned with small talk right? Big ideas are sexy conversation for you. People who enjoy growth frequently look for growth opportunities. You use conversation as an opportunity for you to see how much other people have grown, as well as show your growth to others.

They form deep connections with others

Because you’ve taken the time to get to know yourself so well, it’s easy for you to get to know other people. Not just get to know them, you may be interested in getting to know them better than they know themselves. You get excited about delving deeply into the mind of another person to see what treasures you can uncover.

Advertising

Introverts explore themselves at fascinating depths and others may be surprised when they learn that introverts view them the same way. Take pleasure in clarifying that you’re not antisocial, your time alone allows you to bring more stimulating conversations to the table.

Self-reflection gives them clarity on what they want

People who intentionally spend a great deal of time alone are likely to be introverts. These people naturally know themselves really well. Otherwise, they wouldn’t be able to place such importance on their own subjective views. You have these views because you’re able to go inside and listen carefully to what you want.

Advertising

This kind of self-reflection is bound to bring a certain level of clarity and peace. You take pleasure in handpicking the activities and conversations you’re going to be involved in. In your world, there’s only room for what fulfills you. It’s a good thing that you don’t need any kind of incessant activity to stimulate yourself. If there is a void, you recognize it and fill it yourself.

They are simply smarter

Why do you always go off on your own? Why would you rather be by yourself than even with your best friend? An intelligent mind encourages intelligent actions. Research has shown that intelligent people tend to spend less time socializing because they are busy working on a long-term objective.

A study conducted on 15,000 people aged 18-28 concluded that those who live in areas with less people are more satisfied with life than those who live in dense populations. The study also showed that people who are intelligent become less happy after spending time with friends. Researcher Carol Graham came to the conclusion that intelligent people are so enthused with intellectual goals, that anything that diminishes that is viewed negatively.
All of the time that you’ve spent by yourself is actually an indication that you have some traits that are quite positive. You know yourself, you know how to connect with others, and most importantly you place emphasis on growth. You’re able to prevent yourself from engaging in pointless activities that don’t lead to the results you truly want. Consider yourself fortunate, as many people are not sure what they want to create in life and their focus is scattered, rendering their power less effective than yours.

Featured photo credit: Allef V. via unsplash.com

More by this author

Will You Be Highly Successful in the Future? These 8 Signs Can Foretell the Answer Positivity Ratio: If You Have One Negative Emotion, You Need Three Positive Ones to Counter It pouring water into a glass Don’t Only Drink When You Feel Thirsty. It’d Be Too Late! 75% Of UK Kids Spend Less Time Outdoors Than Prison Inmates Dad walking with daughter into sunset The Real Reason Why Most Of Us Look More Like Our Dads Than Our Moms

Trending in Communication

1The Gentle Art of Saying No 217 Ted Talks for Kids to Inspire Little Minds to Do Big Things 310 Toxic Persons You Should Just Get Rid Of 4Striving Towards Secure Attachment: How to Restructure Your Thoughts 5Being Self Aware Is the Key to Success: How to Boost Self Awareness

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

Advertising

But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

Advertising

What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

Advertising

But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Advertising

Read Next