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10 Ways To Become An Elite Gamer

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10 Ways To Become An Elite Gamer

Gaming is now big business and there are plenty of prizes and cash available for those at the top of the profession, as this rundown of the 10 biggest gaming tournaments in the world will attest. Whether you want to make big money on the circuits or just know that you are the best amongst your own network of peers, here are 10 ways to become an elite gamer.

It’s All about Speed

Over time, any PC can slow down due to a wide range of reasons including problems with malware, insufficient RAM, or because the hard drive needs to be defragmented or cleaned up. The simplest way to tackle the problem is to work through the possible issues raised and see which ones have the biggest impact on your system’s speed.

If you are playing online the other aspect you need to consider is your internet connection. If you are living in a compatible area, it might be time to upgrade to fibre broadband.

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High Spec PC

You will need a high spec PC if you want to play games at the maximum level of detail and resolution your GPU allows, and with all the graphical effects added. The good news is that you can upgrade your PC over time with more memory, a solid state drive, and a faster CPU as your budget allows.

Graphics Card

Your graphics card will be doing most of the hard work so make this a priority as you upgrade. If you want to fit a new one check there is an available PCI slot, enough room in the case for the model of card you want to buy, and make sure your existing power supply is up to the job as it will be drawing much more power. You can find a walkthrough of the process over at PC Advisor.

Peripherals

You will use them for many hours a week so ensure your mouse, keyboard and gaming wheel are the best you can afford. Specially designed mice for gamers will give you a much faster response time and make you more accurate, particularly if you are an FPS player. The design of the mouse is also important and it should be ergonomic if you don’t want to end up with wrist strain.

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Monitor

Your monitor is also going to get a lot of use and needs to be high resolution, so your eyes don’t get tired after lengthy periods online. Your accuracy will depend on the quality of the image so again choose the best model you can afford.

Pick Your Focus

If you want to be amongst the best you need to focus on one genre of gaming, at least initially. So whether you love playing racing games, first-person shooters or MMORPGs choose the one you enjoy the most and dedicate time to becoming the best you can be at it.

Attitude Is Everything

There will be times in your gaming career when you experience setbacks and when you don’t perform as well as you hoped you would. However, the calmer you can remain under pressure, the better you will do. If you are part of a team try to retain good relationships with colleagues. A team which is riven by drama tends not to perform well in competition.

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Learn From Others

You can learn from your peers and by watching other gamers at the top of the profession. YouTube makes it easy to find great examples of those who have won tournaments. Watch them play live and tap into interviews where they talk about their craft.

Practice Makes Perfect

The bottom line is that you are going to need to invest a lot of time practicing until the game becomes second nature, and then from there you can expand your skill-set. While you will need to spend a great many hours in front of your monitor, don’t let success come at the expense of your health. Ensure you eat healthily, take regular breaks, exercise and sleep well as this will give you a better chance of longevity as an elite gamer.

Have Fun

Finally, don’t forget to have fun! Playing games is meant to be enjoyable and just like any other sport, if you can have fun while you are practicing and competing, you can guarantee a better level of success.

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Featured photo credit: Thomas Leuthard via flickr.com

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James Timpson

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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