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Science Says The Seed Of Depression Is Hidden In Your Gut, Not Your Brain

Science Says The Seed Of Depression Is Hidden In Your Gut, Not Your Brain

It was believed that the causes of depression were primarily neurological or originate in the brain, but recent research indicates the depression’s root cause may be directly related to bacteria found in the gut.

Doctors and nutritionists have always known there is a connection between the brain and the gut. Research shows that the gut has a mind of it’s own called the enteric nervous system. According to UK based nutritional therapist, Eve Kalinik,

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“the brain and gut neurons are directly connected via the vagus nerve, explaining why we feel “butterflies in the stomach” when faced with an anxiety-provoking situation.”

So how does bacteria in the gut cause depression?

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Causes of Depression

Scientists were able to discover that the cause of depression, anxiety, and several paediatric disorders, including autism and hyperactivity, have been linked with gastrointestinal abnormalities. Like other chronic diseases such as obesity, heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, depression is primarily an inflammatory condition. To be specific, gut inflammation is the root of depression.

This one revelation has the potential to profoundly impact the medical field and be a major step forward in effectively treating and possibly curing people plagued by depression. While changing a person’s bacteria is still a stretch for doctors, it is easier and more straightforward than trying to change an individual’s genes.

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Treating the gut causes of depression

food-salad-healthy-lunch

    There are some things you can do to help reduce “bad” bacteria and cultivate good bacteria in your gut.

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    • Eat more whole foods– by eating more whole foods and reducing the amount of processed foods you can eliminate gastronomical inflammation. The manipulation processed foods undergoes introduces unnatural toxins and chemicals into your system. Your body has to struggle to break down chemical compounds that are foreign and not intended for the human body. In fact, one study suggests that eating a lot of nutrient-sparse processed foods could up your chances of becoming depressed by as much as 60 percent.
    • Avoid processed forms of sugar, dairy and gluten– Natural sugars, grains and dairy products are good for you. Refined sugars, gluten and processed dairy products have been altered from their natural state. These alterations promote the development of bad bacteria and drastically reduce nutritional value–leaving your brain starved and causing it to malfunction.
    • Eat plenty of fats and proteins–Not all fat is bad for you. Researchers believe that chicken, turkey,  brazil nuts, eggs, avocados and oily fish all have a powerful impact on our mental state. These are sources of important amino acids, vitamins and minerals, which convert into mood-enhancing brain chemicals.
    • Get plenty of Vitamin D– Vitamin D is required for overall brain development and function. Vitamin D deficiency is sometimes associated with depression and other mood disorders. Sunshine, fortified cereals, breads, juices and milk are packed with this essential vitamin.
    • Skip the supplements if possible– Work to get your nutritional needs met through healthy eating habits and not supplements. Nutrients work together in context. Scientists are diligently working to discover if low levels of nutrients are the cause or consequence of poor brain health. You can’t “biohack” your way out of depression with a few pills or “superfoods.”

    Science is not definitive and is constantly evolving. If you or your loved one is depressed, seek professional help. And along with following the advice of the medical professional, remember that the root cause of your depression just may be in your gut. By changing your diet and paying attention to how your stomach feels, your road to recovery could be short and sweet.

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    Denise Hill

    Denise shares about psychology and communication tips on Lifehack.

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    Last Updated on May 28, 2020

    How to Overcome Boredom

    How to Overcome Boredom

    Have you ever been bored? Restless? Fidgety? In need of some inspiration?

    I have a theory on boredom. I believe that the rate of boredom has increased alongside the pace of technology.

    If you think about it, technology has provided us with mobile phones, laptops, Ipads, device after device – all to ultimately fix one problem: boredom.

    What is Boredom?

    We have become a global nation that feeds on entertainment. We associate ‘living’ with ‘doing’. People now do not know how to sit still, and we feel guilty when we are not doing anything. Today, inactivity has become the ultimate sin.

    You might not realize it, but boredom stimulates a form of anxiety and stress. It evokes an emotional state that creates frustration and feeds procrastination.

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    It’s a desire to be ‘doing something’ or to be ‘entertained’ – it’s a desire for sensory stimulation. What it boils down to is a lack of focus.

    If you think about those times when you’re bored, it’s usually because you did not know what to do. So, indecision also plays a big part.

    When we are focused on what’s important to us and what we want to achieve, it’s pretty hard to be bored. So, one answer to boredom is to become focused on what you want.

    Sometimes It’s Good to Be Bored

    If boredom is a desire for sensory stimulation – then what’s the opposite of that? To be content with no stimulation – in other words – to enjoy stillness.

    Sometimes, it’s not boredom itself that causes the frustration but the resistance to doing nothing.

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    Think about it. What would happen if you were to ‘let go’ of the desire to be entertained? You wouldn’t be bored anymore, and you will feel more relaxed!

    In my experience, it’s often the most obvious, simplistic solutions that are the most powerful in life. So, when you’re bored, the easiest way to combat this is to enjoy it.

    It may sound weird but think of ‘boredom’ as a form of ‘relaxation’. It’s a break from the constant stimulation that 21st-century living provides – constant TVs, mobile phones, radios, internet, emails, phone calls, etc.

    Who knows, maybe ‘boredom’ is actually good for us?

    Next time you’re ‘feeling bored’ instead of feeding the frustration by frantically looking for something to do, maybe you can sit back, relax, and savor the feeling of having nothing to do.

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    In this article, I’ll share with you my 3-step strategy on how to overcome boredom.

    3-Step Strategy to Overcome Boredom

    1. Get Focused

    Instead of chasing sensory stimulation at random, focus on what’s really important to you. Focusing on something important helps prevent boredom because it forces you to utilize your time productively.

    You should ask yourself: what would make good use of your time? What could you be doing that would contribute to your major goals in life?

    Here are a few ideas:

    • Spend some time in quiet contemplation considering what’s important to you.
    • Start that creative project you’ve been talking about for the last few weeks.
    • Brainstorm: think of some ideas for new innovative products or businesses.

    2. Kill Procrastination

    Boredom is useful in some ways because it gives you the energy and time to do things. It is only a problem if you let it. But if you use it to motivate yourself to be productive, then you can more easily overcome boredom.

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    So, the next time you’re bored, why not put this good energy to use by ticking off those things that you have been meaning to get done but have been too busy to finish? This also presents a great time for you to clear your to-do list.

    Here are some ideas:

    • Do some exercise.
    • Read a book.
    • Learn something new.
    • Call a friend.
    • Get creative (draw, paint, sculpt, create music, write).
    • Do a spring cleaning.
    • Wash the car.
    • Renovate the house.
    • Re-arrange the furniture.
    • Write your shopping list.
    • Water the plants.
    • Walk the dog.
    • Sort out your mail & email.
    • De-clutter (clear out that wardrobe).

    3. Enjoy Boredom

    If none of the above solutions work, then you can try a different approach. Don’t give in to boredom and instead choose to enjoy it. This doesn’t mean allowing yourself to waste your time being bored. Instead, think of it as your time to relax and re-energize, which will help you be more productive the next time you work.

    Contrary to popular belief, we don’t need to be constantly doing things to be productive. In fact, research has shown that people are more productive when they take periods of rest to recharge.[1] Taking breaks once in a while helps boost your performance and can help make you feel more motivated.

    So, take some time to relax. You never know, you might even like it.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to overcome boredom may be difficult at the beginning, but it can be easier if you make use of some techniques. You can start with my 3-step strategy on how to overcome boredom and work your way from there. So, ready your mind and make use of these tips, and you will be overcoming boredom in no time.

    More Tips on Overcoming Boredom

    Featured photo credit: Johnny Cohen via unsplash.com

    Reference

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