Advertising
Advertising

5 Reasons Why You Should Be Grateful

5 Reasons Why You Should Be Grateful

Be Grateful.

“The root of joy is gratefulness” – David Steindl-Rast

Gratitude is a seed that multiplies once planted. It grows and leads to transformation. I am amazed by the power of gratitude not only within the soul but beyond as well. In my coaching practice, I preach and encourage my clients to imbibe the art of gratitude on a consistent basis.

Personally, every month, I practice the art of gratitude by placing phone calls, or sending email, text or voice messages to mentors, coaches, and key members of my network to acknowledge, appreciate, and honor them.

This conscious effort acknowledges the past, without compromising the present. This small act influences the future by keeping the lines of communication open for future possibilities and opportunities.

Advertising

Here are 5 reasons why you should be grateful:

  1. Gratitude softens hearts
  2. Gratitude uplifts the soul and spirit
  3. Gratitude transforms the giver and receiver
  4. Gratitude is free
  5. Gratitude is a gift that keeps on giving (it literally takes on a life of its own)

To amplify the importance of gratitude, I will share a personal story of my 1st annual performance review. This performance review after so many years remains indelible on my mind for a few reasons but most especially for the lesson of gratitude.

Annual Review

When I started out in my career, like many, I was a ‘raw’, hard working, and driven individual. I was of the opinion that the mantra of “working hard” and letting the rest fall into place was sufficient.

So I just worked hard.
Whatever I was asked to do, I did.

Advertising

When the annual performance review rolled around, I was confident that I had done what was sufficient for a promotion. I submitted my review and anticipated the best news possible. So, imagine my utmost shock when I was informed I didn’t deserve a promotion and had to settle for a meager 3% merit increase.

Is this a joke, I wondered, a 3% increase? It’s been a while and can’t recall to whom I directed the bulk of anger but I was livid. Upset enough that my lips trembled and I had to fight the natural impulse to make a scene. However, I wanted to leave the room without acknowledging the feedback or saying thank you. But, I knew better and mumbled a half-hearted “Thank You” and left.

The day after…

Overnight, I gained some perspective and reminded myself of life’s gifts including my good fortune of a promising job in a great organization. I dragged myself back into my manager’s office and I reiterated what I thought I heard about my career, acknowledged my manager’s feedback and uttered a more thoughtful thank you. I think I said something along these lines “…thank you for your feedback and the bonus you administered on behalf of the company yesterday.

I didn’t stop there…

Advertising

I went to my manager’s boss and said, something similar and along the same lines. I think I said, “Thank you for the feedback and the bonus that was administered (assigned, would probably be more accurate) yesterday.

A Life of Its Own

So, back to the story, it was the shell-shocked look on their faces that gave it away. I knew I had just performed an act that is extremely rare. That was my first lesson on Brand Differentiation. Remember that:

“If you do something different, you will get noticed.”

By stepping out and acting different, I separated myself from others and my actions took on a life of their own. My action opened doors and gave me unlimited access to my manager’s boss which eventually transitioned into a monthly mentoring lunch and much more. A habit I have maintained till date on my journey. Within that new year, I gained new allies, sponsors, and mentors that led to open doors and more opportunities in the office.

Advertising

I want to encourage you to develop a “Gratitude Strategy” as well.

  • Develop an attitude of gratitude
  • Say “Thank You” often
  • Take the time to craft a simple note to those who have helped you at work, school, business, and life

These are little things, but experts agree that in life and relationships, the little things matter. I want to challenge you to try gratitude. It might feel odd at first but give it a try. Trust me, the effect and results are out of this world.

More by this author

Dr. Flo

Executive Director, Hybrid Leadership Institute

Discover 3 Ways To Refresh, Relax, and Rest 5 Questions To Ask Before You Accept A Job Offer 5 Reasons Why You Should Be Grateful Mentors are valuable 5 Reasons Why You Need A Mentor Meeting By Alejandro Escamilla 5 Questions To Ask During An Interview

Trending in Featured

1 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It) 2 8 Simple Ways to Be a Better Listener 3 The Art of Humble Confidence 4 How to Learn Something New Every Day and Stay Smart 5 How to Overcome Procrastination and Start Doing What Truly Matters

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 18, 2020

15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It)

15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It)

It’s okay, you can finally admit it. It’s been two months since you’ve seen the inside of the gym. Getting sick, family crisis, overtime at work and school papers that needed to get finished all kept you for exercising. Now, the question is: how do you start again?
Once you have an exercise habit, it becomes automatic. You just go to the gym, there is no force involved. But after a month, two months or possibly a year off, it can be hard to get started again. Here are some tips to climb back on that treadmill after you’ve fallen off.

  1. Don’t Break the Habit – The easiest way to keep things going is simply not to stop. Avoid long breaks in exercising or rebuilding the habit will take some effort. This may be advice a little too late for some people. But if you have an exercise habit going, don’t drop it at the first sign of trouble.
  2. Reward Showing Up – Woody Allen once said that, “Half of life is showing up.” I’d argue that 90% of making a habit is just making the effort to get there. You can worry about your weight, amount of laps you run or the amount you can bench press later.
  3. Commit for Thirty Days – Make a commitment to go every day (even just for 20 minutes) for one month. This will solidify the exercise habit. By making a commitment you also take pressure off yourself in the first weeks back of deciding whether to go.
  4. Make it Fun – If you don’t enjoy yourself at the gym, it is going to be hard to keep it a habit. There are thousands of ways you can move your body and exercise, so don’t give up if you’ve decided lifting weights or doing crunches isn’t for you. Many large fitness centers will offer a range of programs that can suit your tastes.
  5. Schedule During Quiet Hours – Don’t put exercise time in a place where it will easily be pushed aside by something more important. Right after work or first thing in the morning are often good places to put it. Lunch-hour workouts might be too easy to skip if work demands start mounting.
  6. Get a Buddy – Grab a friend to join you. Having a social aspect to exercising can boost your commitment to the exercise habit.
  7. X Your Calendar – One person I know has the habit of drawing a red “X” through any day on the calendar he goes to the gym. The benefit of this is it quickly shows how long it has been since you’ve gone to the gym. Keeping a steady amount of X’s on your calendar is an easy way to motivate yourself.
  8. Enjoyment Before Effort – After you finish any work out, ask yourself what parts you enjoyed and what parts you did not. As a rule, the enjoyable aspects of your workout will get done and the rest will be avoided. By focusing on how you can make workouts more enjoyable, you can make sure you want to keep going to the gym.
  9. Create a Ritual – Your workout routine should become so ingrained that it becomes a ritual. This means that the time of day, place or cue automatically starts you towards grabbing your bag and heading out. If your workout times are completely random, it will be harder to benefit from the momentum of a ritual.
  10. Stress Relief – What do you do when your stressed? Chances are it isn’t running. But exercise can be a great way to relieve stress, releasing endorphin which will improve your mood. The next time you feel stressed or tired, try doing an exercise you enjoy. When stress relief is linked to exercise, it is easy to regain the habit even after a leave of absence.
  11. Measure Fitness – Weight isn’t always the best number to track. Increase in muscle can offset decreases in fat so the scale doesn’t change even if your body is. But fitness improvements are a great way to stay motivated. Recording simple numbers such as the number of push-ups, sit-ups or speed you can run can help you see that the exercise is making you stronger and faster.
  12. Habits First, Equipment Later – Fancy equipment doesn’t create a habit for exercise. Despite this, some people still believe that buying a thousand dollar machine will make up for their inactivity. It won’t. Start building the exercise habit first, only afterwards should you worry about having a personal gym.
  13. Isolate Your Weakness – If falling off the exercise wagon is a common occurrence for you, find out why. Do you not enjoy exercising? Is it a lack of time? Is it feeling self-conscious at the gym? Is it a lack of fitness know-how? As soon as you can isolate your weakness, you can make steps to improve the situation.
  14. Start Small – Trying to run fifteen miles your first workout isn’t a good way to build a habit. Work below your capacity for the first few weeks to build the habit. Otherwise you might scare yourself off after a brutal workout.
  15. Go for Yourself, Not to Impress – Going to the gym with the only goal of looking great is like starting a business with only the goal to make money. The effort can’t justify the results. But if you go to the gym to push yourself, gain energy and have a good time, then you can keep going even when results are slow.

Read Next