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How Knowing More Than One Language Makes You Much More Empathetic

How Knowing More Than One Language Makes You Much More Empathetic

If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart.
‒Nelson Mandela

Have you ever tried to communicate with someone you cannot understand? There are many ways that we can understand another person. But to know them the best, attempting to share a language can be a great way to truly understanding somebody, and a direct route to their heart. It can also be an incredible way to further yourself as a human being, and it can create much more empathy within us as people. We can experience an absolute shift in our emotional range, when our horizons expand through new languages. Understanding another’s culture means understanding each other as an entire race – the human kind.

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It strengthens your mind and makes you more receptive to others’ emotions and personal experiences

Studies have shown that we can train our brains. Like any muscle, your brain is trained and developed into good health when you expand your knowledge. Our minds need constant feeding to be kept healthy, and to be able to continuously grow. The best way to connect our emotional growth with our mental health is to expand our knowledge and our learning. This means more than simply exercising a muscle, it means opening up our hearts too. When we learn a language, it makes us more intelligent; we are more creative, and more receptive to others’ emotions and personal experiences. We are also more connected with our fellow human beings; this happens when we learn to understand our differences.

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A study on infants and children that learn at least one other language during their development showed cognitive benefits as opposed to children who did not. Other studies report that there may be scientific evidence for the protection against diseases like Alzheimer’s and Dementia in patients that have learned more than one language in their lifetime. The theory is similar to the idea of flexing a muscle; the brain is kept healthy with the knowledge of multiple languages- even into old age.

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It allows deeper kind of self-reflection

You cannot learn a language in one day, it’s just not possible. Just like how you can’t learn all there is to know about the world in a day, a month, a year or even a lifetime. But there is something in the heart, mind, or the soul one might say, that connects us more deeply when we communicate through certain languages; through a persons native tongue. It shows a kind of respect and common ground, allowing a connection that runs much deeper than the surface.
Being bilingual for example, means tapping into further parts of our brain, like a stretched and flexed muscle. We become open to furthering our creativity, which then allows us a deeper kind of self-reflection and insight into our world. We also better understand our beliefs, and our passions by having a view of this greater picture we develop. We are boosting our brain power and boosting our ideas.

It enables you to integrate with other cultures and understand people’s lifestyles

This asset is second to none. Our world opens up in so many new ways when we know another language. Obviously, we become more capable of understanding others, but we are also able to integrate with other cultures and understand people’s lifestyles. A language is like a universe, and so the more languages we know, the more universes open up to us. Studies further this theory by indicating that there is richness, depth of understanding, and knowledge, within children who are bilingual. Their minds are stretched beyond a simple one-track focus- beyond the mere understanding of their own immediate surrounds and single culture.  

One language sets you in a corridor for life. Two languages open every door along the way.
‒Frank Smith

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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