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Travel Boosts Mood Even More Than Exercising Or Shopping, Survey Finds

Travel Boosts Mood Even More Than Exercising Or Shopping, Survey Finds

“I am not the same, having seen the moon shine on the other side of the world.”

Mary Anne Radmacher

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If you have experienced that feel good buzz after having a satisfying or relaxing holiday, you are not alone. A new study conducted by Wakefield Research reveals that traveling boosts your mood. The “Traveler’s Sweet Spot” survey even showed that people found traveling made them feel even better than they did if they partook in a shopping spree or exercise.

The survey found that people often travel for a reason. They may travel for a wedding, a baby shower or just to spend time with friends and family. Whatever the reason, travel seems to be fulfilling for most of us.

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The Findings Of The Survey

The survey consisted of 1,005 U.S. adults and looked at different types of trips that most successfully boosted people’s moods. It was found that 38 percent of men and 34 percent of women preferred romantic getaways as their choice vacations. Family escapes (33 percent of all participants) came in a close second and holidays with good friends (23 percent) were also found to be favored by many.

A Short Trip Can Do The Trick

The survey also found that the trip needn’t be extensive in order to provide that good buzz. Four out of five Americans said that they would prefer to take a few short trips than one long getaway. Forty-four percent reported that they aim to take three to four holidays, while nearly ten percent strive to take seven or more holidays in 2016.

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Healthy Activity While Traveling Can Also Help Your Mood. Getting out and about also contributes to that good feeling. Dr. Linda Papadopoulos, a psychologist who worked with Expedia on a study, says “Exposure to a healthy amount of sunshine is also believed to increase the brain’s release of the hormone serotonin which is associated with boosting mood and helping a person feel calm and focused,” 

Travel Can Also Boost Your Sex Life. The benefits of travel are more than just mood boosting. According to the study, travel was found to help people improve their health, lose weight, gain confidence and increase their sex drive. Getting out and about helps improve your libido and can make you feel more positive about being intimate with others.

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Travel Can Help You Lose Weight. When people travel they tend to undertake spurts of healthy activity. They seem to ditch their old bad habits and take up new routines. When you start to be more active, you not only benefit from the weight loss, you can also reduce anxiety and improve your mood. Traveling actually helps reduce the levels of cortisol, the stress hormone. As stress and anxiety decreases, mood increases, bringing many unexpected positive benefits in how we perceive ourselves, motivation, productivity, and our general outlook on life.”

Travel Can Make You More Creative. In addition to gaining a better sex life, body image and an increased sense of overall happiness, more than two million respondents in the study, said that traveling made them more creative. Seeing things in a different way and having many first time experiences may be the reason that travel aids creativity.

 Summation

It is worth putting in the effort and saving so you can realize your next holiday dream. You will find that the benefits leave you with a good feeling and an overall sense of health and well-being. You may even be pleasantly surprised by the loss of some extra pounds and the improvement in your sex life. If you long to see the moon on the other side of the world, make today that day and follow your dream.

Featured photo credit: The G Brief via thegbrief.com

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Rebecca Beris

Rebecca is a wellness and lifestyle writer at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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