Advertising
Advertising

How To Show Your Love For Animals Effectively!

How To Show Your Love For Animals Effectively!

I love animals and especially my cats, Ophelia and Siren. These feelings pulled me to help out at my local cat shelter. It broke my heart to see homeless cats out on the street, and it felt great to go to the shelter and play with rescued cats. I donated to the cat shelter, knowing it would help even more animals in need.

It’s very natural for us to show our love for animals this way. Our brains are wired to pay attention to our immediate environment. Now, there was a nagging voice at the back of my head that told me that animals endure suffering around the world. However, I shunted away that voice whenever it began to grow loud and told myself that I was doing the best thing I could to help animals.

Yet when I talked to my friend Marsha, a fellow volunteer at the cat shelter with years of experience, she pointed out that even though I was already doing a lot to help these cats, I could use my time and money to help many more animals, and feel even better about my impact.

Advertising

A Dilemma

She posed an ethical dilemma: Say I was walking to work and saw a kitten drowning in a pond – deep enough to leave me soaking wet, but shallow enough to not pose a more serious threat. But, the kitten is in urgent need of help, and saving that kitten would ruin my smartphone. Would I dive in to save her?

Imagining my cats, my intuitive gut reaction was “Of course!” I wouldn’t even hesitate.

Using that intuitive response, Marsha highlighted that my emotional self was clearly committed to animal welfare. She pointed out that there are many animals right now whose lives I could save for much less than the cost of my smartphone (for example, by donating to the right animal charity). And this would even cost much less time and money than I was putting into the cat shelter.

Advertising

This adaptation of Peter Singer’s famous thought experiment made me realize I could do much more to help animals. My actions could have been hundreds of times more impactful if I used my resources as effectively as possible. Wasn’t it clear to me, as an animal lover, that effectiveness is what animals deserve? If I could help more animals with the same money and time, why wouldn’t I do it? What could I say to the animals I didn’t help? “Sorry, but I don’t care about you because I can’t see you in front of me?”

Questioning My Perspective

I still felt conflicted. I knew what Marsha said made sense, but it was tough to accept. If nothing else, I just really enjoyed stroking the cats at the cat shelter. Marsha said she understood my perspective, as she has a cat herself. She thought about this question deeply in the past, and decided to split her volunteering and her donations in order to balance her own well-being and happiness, and do the most good for the world at the same time.

She spends most of her time volunteering for the local cat shelter. She also does small actions that help larger numbers of animals for a few minutes each week in-between other tasks.

Advertising

However, she intentionally sends her donations to the most effective charities. These are charities that have been evaluated to have the most impact per dollar. After all, the animal shelter gets plenty of donations from people who don’t have her more effective giving perspective, and donating wouldn’t give the same personal satisfaction as volunteering at the shelter.

She donates based on the recommendations of Animal Charity Evaluators, a nonprofit organization that offers in-depth evaluations of the most effective animal advocacy charities. It has recommended The Humane League, Mercy For Animals, and Animal Equality, and you can see its current top picks here.

Updating My Beliefs

This plan of action made a lot of sense to me, and I made a conscious effort to update my beliefs and actions based on new evidence. I started donating to the three charities recommended by ACE, as well as ACE itself, so that it could continue conducting research and providing advice to advocates on behalf of the broader field of animal rights.

Advertising

At the same time, I continue to volunteer at the cat shelter. Being with those wonderful, furry balls of love helps motivate my animal advocacy and fill my heart with the desire to do good for animals everywhere. Now I truly have it all – I’m able to both spend time with cats in the shelter while making a much larger impact on addressing animal suffering through my donations to effective charities.

Featured photo credit: Doria Morrel/Flickr via flickr.com

More by this author

Dr. Gleb Tsipursky

President and Co-Founder at Intentional Insights; Disaster Avoidance Consultant

How To Protect Women’s Freedom How To Pick The Most Cost-Effective Charities For Your Donations On Giving Tuesday Hilarious Video On Dealing With Irrationality In Politics To Pin or Not to Pin? 4 Questions to Ask Before Wearing a Safety Pin How To Be A Truly Good Person

Trending in Communication

110 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks 2When You Start to Enjoy Being Single, These 12 Things Will Happen 321 Best Tips On Making A Long Distance Relationship Work 4The Skill That Most People Don’t Have: Active Listening 518 Signs You’ve Found Your Soulmate

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

Advertising

How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

Advertising

Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

Advertising

The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

Advertising

9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Read Next