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4 Reasons Why You Should Remove “Sorry” From Your Vocabulary

4 Reasons Why You Should Remove “Sorry” From Your Vocabulary

As I walk into my boss’ office, I am greeted with the click-clacking sounds of fingers dancing ferociously over computer keys and see a furrowed brow framing laser focused eyes staring intently at the screen.

“Hey Becky, um sorry to bother you but…”

I am boarding the crowded DC train in the middle of rush hour and am carried aboard in a wave of frustrated and harried people. I drop my bag between my feet and reach up and grab the overhead bar to stabilize myself as I begin the long trek home.  Another passenger’s hand grazes mine.  Again, I say sorry.

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I say sorry at least 15 times each day–whether I am at fault or not. It has become a staple in my vocabulary.

To all my chronic over apologizers–why do we do that?

One common theory, which fairly accurately explains my overuse of the word “sorry,” is that being perceived as rude is so abhorrent–especially to women— that we need to make ourselves less obtrusive before we speak up. We also say sorry to display humility and as a way to avoid or quickly end conflict.

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Here are some reasons we should rethink when, why and how we say sorry and possibly strike it from our vocabulary altogether:

1. It devalues the purpose of an apology

When we say sorry too easily and too frequently or when we apologize for things that are clearly not our fault, not in our control, or otherwise unworthy of apology we completely strip away the meaning and the power of a sincere apology.

The bottom line here is saying sorry too much can trivialize the act of the apology, making the important ones carry less weight. Be careful about crying wolf–save it for when you really need it, and mean it.

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2. We devalue ourselves by saying sorry so frequently

Most people equate apologizing with humility. We tend to think that a prideful person can offend someone and walk away with apologizing. An interesting thing happens however, when we say sorry in situations that do not warrant that word. We tell people that they are worth more than we are. It signifies that our low self-esteem is low.

There is nothing wrong with being a confident, self assured individual that doesn’t take responsibility for someone else’s mistake. You are a living, breathing being who deserves to be seen as an equal by everyone you encounter. Don’t devalue yourself. The next time someone runs into you, scrap the apology and instead share an understanding glance. It happens.

3. Sorry is used to try and fix situations but it doesn’t resolve conflicts

This is especially true for those of us who don’t like confrontation and will go to any length just to avoid a scene. We will quickly fling “sorry” at a situation to stifle an argument before it starts. And while this is necessary at times, other times we need to “man up” or “put our big girl panties on” and work to actually resolve the conflict.

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Saying sorry also can be a way of manipulating a situation. We will use it an effort to avoid addressing a certain topic or having to face undesirable behaviors or attributes. How many times have we heard–or even said–“I said I’m sorry, what else do you want from me?” This is a classic way of using a weak (and usually insincere) apology to fix something without reaching a resolution.

4. Sorry makes you–in fact– SORRY!

A person who is always apologizing, especially in the work place, will quickly be viewed and labeled a sorry individual. It gives people the impression that you are mistake prone,  incompetent and a sorry individual.

Over apologizing can actually effect your self-esteem and self-perception. It’s the law of the self fulfilling prophecy.The more you say you are sorry, the more you will believe it and ultimately become it.

Challenge:

Try not to say sorry for a full 24 hours.  That doesn’t mean that you should avoid apologizing if you are at fault. Take responsibility and apologize without using the word sorry.

Here are a few words/phrases that can help you with this endeavor:

  • “Excuse/pardon me”
  • “Thank you”
  • “I regret…”
  • “It’s unfortunate…”
  • “That’s sad”
  • Silence

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Denise Hill

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Last Updated on November 5, 2018

8 Powerful Reasons to Love Your Enemies

8 Powerful Reasons to Love Your Enemies

We’ve all got our enemies; people who take pleasure in causing us pain and misery. Sometimes, the development of an enemy is due to certain differences in your characters and events have led to that. Other times, some people end up hating you for apparently no reason at all.

Regardless of how you got this enemy, as opposed to the paradigm of fighting fire with fire, consider the following reasons and see why you should actually appreciate your enemies. This article will show you not only how to not be bothered by your enemies, but how to actually foster love for them.

Read on to learn the secret.

1. It’s a practical lesson in anger management

To be honest, your enemies are the best people to help you understand your sense of anger management. When it might be true that your enemies have a way of bringing out the worst in you as regards anger, it is also true that they can help you in your quest to have that anger managed. You can’t get truly angry at someone you love and it is only in that time when you get truly annoyed that you learn how to manage it.

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Anger management is more effective when it is in practice and not in theory

Your enemies are like the therapists who you need, but actually don’t want. Inasmuch as you might want to hate them, they provide you an opportunity to control the anger impulse that you have.

2. It’s an opportunity for healthy competition

You might not know it, but your enemies make for great rivals as they help harness the competitor in you (sometimes, you might not even know or bee conversant with this competitive side until you come across an adversary). You get the right motivation to compete and this can go a long way to spur you to victory.

However, while doing so, it is also essential that you remember not to become a worse version of yourself while competing. Working against an adversary is tricky, and you need to ensure that you don’t cause harm to yourself or your morals in the process. Healthy competition is all you need to get out of this.

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3. Their negative comments can help you make a breakthrough

It is true that your enemies never really have much good to say about you. However, in as much as they might be talking out of a place of hate, there might be some truth to what they’re saying.

To wit, whenever you hear something mean or nasty from an enemy, you might want to take a step back and evaluate yourself. There is a chance that what this enemy is saying is true and coming to face that fact is a major step in helping you to become a better person overall. This is another testament to the fact that enemies can be therapists in their own way.

4. Enemies can also be powerful allies

Loving your enemies can also mean making an effort to interact and make peace with them. In the end, if you are able to establish some common ground and patch things up, you’ll have succeeded in making another friend. And who doesn’t need friends?

This can also help you in working with people in the long run. You get to hone your inter-personal skills, and that can be a big plus to your ledger.

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5. It gives you the ability to realize positivity

In a multitude of negativity, a speck of positivity always seems to find its way through.

Sometimes, a knowledge of the fact that you have enemies will also help you to focus on the many positives and good things that are in your life. A lot of times, we neglect what really matters in life. This can be due to being overly concerned with the enemies we have.

However, it is also possible for this acknowledgement to spur you to take a step back and appreciate the goo things (and people who surround you).

6. There might just be a misunderstanding

Sometimes, the reason why you have an enemy might be something very innocuous. You might not have known the cause of this fractured relationship and your enemy will help complete the picture.

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Simply approaching them will help you to understand the reason for the fracture. This, in turn, can help you to work towards healing your relationship moving forward. Misunderstandings happen, and you need to be able to work around them.

7. You learn to appreciate love as well

A constant reminder of the fact that there are enemies will also help you not to take those who love you for granted. Love and hate are two opposing emotions and it is possible for one to momentarily overshadow the other.

However, while you’ll always have enemies, there will also always be people who love you. These people need to be appreciated for what they do for you. Never let the hate projected to you from your enemies take the place of that.

8. Do you really need the hate?

The truth is that enemies bring only toxic emotions and generate bad reactions from you. If you’re truly to live a prosperous life, you can’t really be carrying all this baggage around.

Hate is bad and you should try all you can to get rid of it. It is a well-known fact that nobody can get really far in life while carrying a lot of emotional baggage. Well, hate is the biggest form of emotional baggage there is.

Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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