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6 Fashion Hacks For Introverts

6 Fashion Hacks For Introverts

There are those of us who prefer a quiet movie at home to a packed show in a stadium, or a nice cup of coffee with a friend to drinks at a club. It’s not that we hate people, or social interaction. But, we can only take so much of it, and then we need time by ourselves to recuperate. Sometimes, we have to venture out into the world when we’re not really feeling it, and for those times, there are actually some “fashion hacks” that can make the process more bearable.

1. Wear Sunglasses

Who cares if it’s sunny out? A big, dark pair of shades means you don’t have to make eye contact with anyone, at all. Eye contact, that first sign that we may have to interact with a stranger, that thing that makes the heart start beating a little faster and the sweat start to creep down. It’s no longer a problem in a good pair of shades, and the best part is, you don’t have to worry about any of those old fashioned rules about square sunglasses for  round face and round frame for a square face: as long as you feel comfortable and confident when you look in the mirror, you’ve got the right pair.

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2. Don A Big Hat

When it’s just too dark out for sunglasses, a hat with a nice wide brim can help alleviate those pesky incidences of eye contact. The bigger the brim, the better. A baseball cap is a great option, as they’re fairly common and go with a lot of different outfits and style profiles. A cowboy hat or straw sun hat can also do the trick, just be careful that it’s not too snazzy. Anything terribly unique that could be considered a “statement piece” is more likely to draw attention that repel it.

3. Wear Drab Colors

In a study conducted by librarians about how to be more approachable, researchers found that blue was the most approachable color when it comes to clothing. While blue is a fairly common (and calming) color that holds a place in many wardrobes, it may be best to avoid it if you are looking to avoid people. Greens, blue-greens, teal, tan, and peachy-orange are also colors considered the most friendly and approachable, so going with a drab grey, black, or white is your best bet to blend in and appear neutral.

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4. Sport A Hooded Coat Or Sweatshirt

For me, there’s nothing more comfortable than a good hoodie. The bonus is, you can always put the hood up to make yourself appear instantly more closed off. I’m not sure what it is, but there’s just something about a person who’s standing there with their hands in their pockets and their hood over their head that says, “don’t talk to me.”

5. Headphones

These days, it’s becoming more and more acceptable to walk around just about anywhere with a pair of headphones in. If you’ve got a pair of buds in, people are less likely to bug you, and will only try and get your attention if they have to. Plus, it’s a great excuse to pretend like you didn’t hear someone, say that person you haven’t seen since high school that is trying to wave you down in the grocery store…

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6. Be Comfortable And Happy

It’s important to remember that comfortable clothing is always key, whether it’s a first date or just a trip to the corner store. If your shoes are pinching your toes, you’re constantly pulling your shirt down, or you’re afraid to sit because your skirt will bunch too far up, you’re going to start out nervous and uncomfortable, which can exacerbate any social anxiety you are trying to tamp down.

If you are simply in a bad mood and really don’t want to be doing whatever it is you’re doing, try putting on something that makes you feel happy. In a study about how clothing affects emotions, researchers found that clothing choice does influence mood, and you can uplift your spirits simply by wearing something that brings a smile to your face. All in all, you want your unwanted outing to go as smoothly as possible, and starting off in a bad mood can definitely hinder that.

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Good Luck!

Us introverts don’t always have it easy, but we get by. There are lots of ways to be a happy introvert, and hopefully these tips can make your next outing a little more comfortable and serene.

Featured photo credit: Photo by Unsplash via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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