Advertising
Advertising

3 Signs You’re A Rational And Emotional Thinker At The Same Time (That Means You’re Actually Creative)

3 Signs You’re A Rational And Emotional Thinker At The Same Time (That Means You’re Actually Creative)

Have you been called emotional? Or maybe you have been labeled as someone who is logical and rational? What happens when you’re a mix of both emotional and rational rolled up into one complex personality? Can that even exist? Most people separate emotional and rational thinking into two separate categories, but is it plausible you could be a unique blend of both? Could being an emotional and rational thinker at the same time, mean you’re actually a creative person?

We often associate creativity with an individual who is right-brain dominant. Oddly enough, scientists have determined that someone who is creative is constantly switching between rational and emotional thinking.

Advertising

So if you have been called rational at one point in your life and maybe emotional at another point in your life, you’re not alone. Turns out people who are creative have both rational and emotional mindsets working in unison in order to operate in a creative fashion.

According to psychologist, Frank Barron, whose work involved exploring the creative mind, he described a creative person as: “Both more primitive and more cultivated, more destructive, a lot madder and a lot saner than the average person.”

3 Signs You’re a Rational and Emotional Thinker at the Same time.

1. You can spot illogical parts of a plot of a movie, and you’re also often moved to tears by great movies

Maybe you have the skill to be able to see the order in the disorder. Meaning, you can watch a movie, read a book, or observe a real life situation that is filled with chaos and illogical reasoning. But through the thick smog of illogical thinking and doing, you’re able to identify the disorder that is creating, well the disorder. An intuitive skill a creative person may possess is the ability to dig deep in chaos and find the root of the disorder.

On the other hand, if you’re a creative thinker (someone who is both an emotional and rational thinker) you may be moved to tears watching a television commercial or movie. You’re sensitive and keen on how emotions play a part in our world.

Advertising

2. You always think about how to improve yourself for a better future, and you at the same time value memories so much

People who are rational and emotional thinkers are often seeking ways to improve themselves. Whether it be taking a new class to add additional skills to your life or expand a creative outlet for your creative self. Self-Improvement is something that may be second nature to someone who thinks emotionally and rationally. It could be representative of the constant balancing act of having to think rationally while setting aside emotions and vice versa.

On the other hand, those who think rationally and emotionally value memories so much so that at times they use profound memories to afford them a creative outlet. The creative person who is constantly seeking self-improvement techniques may be using this to cope with past memories.

Advertising

3. You miss/love someone in your previous relationships but your rationality tellls you it won’t work and you’re not going to make repeated mistakes

A creative person may be conflicted when it comes to past relationships. The emotional part may tend to want to hang on to old memories or to make efforts to rekindle a relationship. Meanwhile, the rational part of you will guide you to avoid making the same mistake twice and propel forward so you can move on.

Conclusion

The fantastic thing about being both a rational and emotional thinker is that you have the ability to be flexible in activating specific areas of your brain and are better able to address novel situations with a unique perspective. Sure being a rational and emotional thinker most likely means you’re a creative type of person, but it may also mean that you’re a bit harder to pin down or define. You’re a unique person with a fresh perspective to offer the world.

Advertising

More by this author

Tara Massan

Founder of Be Moved, Life Coach and Writer.

Are You Right-Brain Dominant? (7 Right Brain Characteristics) Why Singing In The Shower Can Boost Your Confidence And Health When You’re Made To Feel Unwanted, Leave And Never Turn Back 11 Hidden Signs You’re Highly Empathetic But You May Not Even Notice That What Happens When You Refuse To Be A Victim And Decide To Take Control

Trending in Communication

1 How to Stop Living on Autopilot with Antonio Neves 2 The Gentle Art of Saying No For a Less Stressful Life 3 7 Ways to Make Life Changing Decisions 4 Living in the Past? 7 Ways To Let Go And Live A Happy Life 5 What’s the Meaning of Life? A Guide to Live with Meaning

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on August 4, 2020

The Gentle Art of Saying No For a Less Stressful Life

The Gentle Art of Saying No For a Less Stressful Life

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here’s how to master the Gentle Art of Saying No:

Advertising

1. Value Your Time

Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”

2. Know Your Priorities

Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time?

For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.

3. Practice Saying No

Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.

4. Don’t Apologize

A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.

Advertising

5. Stop Being Nice

Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets.

Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.

6. Say No to Your Boss

Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no,” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning.

But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.

7. Pre-Empting

It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting,

Advertising

“Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”

8. Get Back to You

Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them:

“After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.”

At least you gave it some consideration.

9. Maybe Later

If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say,

Advertising

“This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].”

Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.

10. It’s Not You, It’s Me

This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often, the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time.

Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

More Tips for a Less Stressful Life

Featured photo credit: Kyle Glenn via unsplash.com

Read Next