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3 Signs You’re A Rational And Emotional Thinker At The Same Time (That Means You’re Actually Creative)

3 Signs You’re A Rational And Emotional Thinker At The Same Time (That Means You’re Actually Creative)

Have you been called emotional? Or maybe you have been labeled as someone who is logical and rational? What happens when you’re a mix of both emotional and rational rolled up into one complex personality? Can that even exist? Most people separate emotional and rational thinking into two separate categories, but is it plausible you could be a unique blend of both? Could being an emotional and rational thinker at the same time, mean you’re actually a creative person?

We often associate creativity with an individual who is right-brain dominant. Oddly enough, scientists have determined that someone who is creative is constantly switching between rational and emotional thinking.

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So if you have been called rational at one point in your life and maybe emotional at another point in your life, you’re not alone. Turns out people who are creative have both rational and emotional mindsets working in unison in order to operate in a creative fashion.

According to psychologist, Frank Barron, whose work involved exploring the creative mind, he described a creative person as: “Both more primitive and more cultivated, more destructive, a lot madder and a lot saner than the average person.”

3 Signs You’re a Rational and Emotional Thinker at the Same time.

1. You can spot illogical parts of a plot of a movie, and you’re also often moved to tears by great movies

Maybe you have the skill to be able to see the order in the disorder. Meaning, you can watch a movie, read a book, or observe a real life situation that is filled with chaos and illogical reasoning. But through the thick smog of illogical thinking and doing, you’re able to identify the disorder that is creating, well the disorder. An intuitive skill a creative person may possess is the ability to dig deep in chaos and find the root of the disorder.

On the other hand, if you’re a creative thinker (someone who is both an emotional and rational thinker) you may be moved to tears watching a television commercial or movie. You’re sensitive and keen on how emotions play a part in our world.

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2. You always think about how to improve yourself for a better future, and you at the same time value memories so much

People who are rational and emotional thinkers are often seeking ways to improve themselves. Whether it be taking a new class to add additional skills to your life or expand a creative outlet for your creative self. Self-Improvement is something that may be second nature to someone who thinks emotionally and rationally. It could be representative of the constant balancing act of having to think rationally while setting aside emotions and vice versa.

On the other hand, those who think rationally and emotionally value memories so much so that at times they use profound memories to afford them a creative outlet. The creative person who is constantly seeking self-improvement techniques may be using this to cope with past memories.

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3. You miss/love someone in your previous relationships but your rationality tellls you it won’t work and you’re not going to make repeated mistakes

A creative person may be conflicted when it comes to past relationships. The emotional part may tend to want to hang on to old memories or to make efforts to rekindle a relationship. Meanwhile, the rational part of you will guide you to avoid making the same mistake twice and propel forward so you can move on.

Conclusion

The fantastic thing about being both a rational and emotional thinker is that you have the ability to be flexible in activating specific areas of your brain and are better able to address novel situations with a unique perspective. Sure being a rational and emotional thinker most likely means you’re a creative type of person, but it may also mean that you’re a bit harder to pin down or define. You’re a unique person with a fresh perspective to offer the world.

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More by this author

Tara Massan

Founder of Be Moved, Life Coach and Writer.

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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