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5 Best Ways to Restore Data from Windows 10 after Accidental Formatting

5 Best Ways to Restore Data from Windows 10 after Accidental Formatting

For every individual user or organisation, it is important to have a backup plan. If you do not have one, it’s never too late – it would hardly take 10 minutes to set up! Once you set up a backup plan, your precious data will continue to back up on a regular basis. In fact, on Windows 10, it’s much easier than ever before.

With the help of inbuilt utilities, you can easily backup all your important files and folders. If you don’t act now, you might regret letter once your data becomes unavailable due to number of causes like system failure, drive corrupt, accidentally formatted etc.

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Windows 10

    File History

    Introduced with the evolution of Windows 8, File History reappeared in the latest Windows 10 version. It is still considered the most recommended way to backup data. File History has been integrated in the Control Panel as well as the Settings app. File History only backs up files that are located in the user account folder.

    All the data stored at C:/Users/[account name] is backed up. This includes the documents, desktop, downloads, pictures, music and other folders. Any data stored on OneDrive is also replicated. File history is smart enough to detect and monitor folders and files for changes. It then backs up files and folders automatically that have changed or modified. It works similar to Mac OSX Time Machine.

    OneDrive

    In a traditional sense, OneDrive is not a backup solution, but due to its integration in Windows 10, it is considered an efficient medium to backup data. Files stored in OneDrive get synced with the online OneDrive account. The stored data can be accessed from other devices anytime and from anywhere.

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    If, due to any reason, all your Windows data turns inaccessible, you can log in to your OneDrive account from any other machine and all your stored data will be displayed in the File Explorer window. This way, you can get instant access to your data from anywhere in just few clicks.

    System Image Backup

    This backup feature is available in the left panel of the Backup and Restore window. Select ‘Create a System Image’ from the left panel and follow the instructions prompted thereafter. Alternatively, launch File History and then select System Image from the window. These options offer creating an entire image of the Windows system, system settings, operating system and user files.

    The backup can be stored on any external storage media such as USB drives, Network locations or DVD. If you wish the computer to return back to a particular state, you can restore the backup back to machine. If any of the data is found to be missing while implementing manual procedures, you can use third party software to recover accidentally deleted files.

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    Advanced Startup Options

    From the options given under Advanced Startup, you can restore Windows from the system image that was created earlier. It can also be used to perform maintenance checks as well as to resolve certain issues. This feature also works if the Windows 10 machine encounters boot problems.

    To access Advanced Startup Options, open the Settings app and then select Update & Security. Next, select Recovery and click on Restart Now available under Advanced Startup.

    Third Party Backup Software

    There are, of course, external programs that can be downloaded that will backup and if necessary, restore data. Many will continuously monitor all the states of your files like when they’re modified, created, or moved into new locations.

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    As always, we recommend doing stringent research on the available options and products – there are many free software packages for performing data backups and retrievals, but the efficiency and efficacy of the services can vary wildly between vendors and products. With that said, be aware that paid software is not necessarily a better option!

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    Abhay Jeet Mishra

    Writer at Lifehack & Enterested.com

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    Last Updated on August 29, 2018

    5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

    5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

    Journaling is one of the most useful personal development tools around. Not only does it help us process emotions and experiences, work through internal conflicts and improve our self-awareness, it also provides us with a way to keep a day-to-day record of our lives. Traditionally an activity limited to pen and paper, the expansion of consumer technology has enabled journaling to go digital.

    Saving your journaling entries online enables you to access them from anywhere, without having to carry a notebook and pen around, and provides you with digital features, like tagging and search functions.

    Here are a list of five online journaling tools you can use to bring your practice into the modern age:

    1. 750words

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    750 words

      750words is a free online journaling tool created by Buster Benson. The site is based on the idea of “Morning Pages”; a journaling tool Julia Cameron suggests in her creativity course The Artist’s Way. Cameron advises aspiring creatives to start each morning with three pages of stream-of-consciousness writing to clear away the mental clutter, leaving you with a clearer mind to face the day.

      750 words is the three-page digital equivalent (assuming the average person writes 250 words per page) and lets you store all your journaling online. Each morning, you’ll receive a prompt asking you to write your 750 words, and the site keeps track of various statistics associated with your entries. The site uses a Regressive Imagery Dictionary to calculate the emotional content from your posts and provides feedback on features like your mood, and most commonly used words.

      750 words is simple to set up and is ideal for anyone who finds it challenging to maintain a consistent journaling practice. The site uses a number of incentives to motivate users, including animal badges awarded to journalers who complete a certain number of days in a row, leader boards, and opt-in monthly challenges.

      2. Ohlife

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      ohlife

        Ohlife is designed to make online journaling as easy as possible. Once you’ve signed up for your free account, the website will send you an email each day asking “How did your day go?” Simply reply to the email with as much or as little detail as you like, and your response will be stored on your account, ready to view next time you log in.

        Ohlife’s appeal lies in its simplicity: no stats, no social sharing, no complicated organisational systems—the site is designed to provide you with a private, online space. Simply respond to the email each day (or skip the days you’re busy) and Ohlife will do the rest.

        3. Oneword

        oneword

          OneWord is a fun online tool that provides you with a single word as a prompt and gives you sixty seconds to write about it. The concept’s aim is to help writers learn how to flow, and the prompts range from the everyday mundane to the profound.

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          Oneword is not a private journaling tool: if you sign up, your answers will be published on the site’s daily blog, which contains a stream of users’ answers, and might be used by Oneword in the future. If you’d rather keep your answers to yourself, you can still use the tool for fun without giving out any personal details.

          4. Penzu

            Penzu is a journaling tool that allows you to store your journaling notes online. The service also offers mobile apps for iOS, Android and Blackberry, so you can journal on the go and save your notes to your account. The basic service is free, however you can upgrade to Penzu Pro and get access to additional features, including military-grade encryption and the ability to save and sync data through your mobile, for $19 per year.

            With either version of Penzu, you can insert pictures, and add tags and comments to entries, as well as search for older entries. You can set your posts to be private and viewable by you only, or share them with others.

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            5. Evernote

            Evernote isn’t a purpose-built journaling tool, however its features make it perfect for keeping your journaling notes in one safe place. With the ability to keep separate “notebooks”, tag your entries, include pictures, audio and web clipping, Evernote will appeal to journalers who want to include more formats than just text in their entries.

            Available online within a web browser, and as a stand-alone desktop app, the service also comes with a series of mobile apps covering almost every device available. These allow you to make notes on the go and sync between the mobile and browser versions of the app.

            For additional features, including text recognition and the ability to collaborate on Notebooks, you can upgrade to Evernote’s premium service, which costs $5 per month.

            Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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