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4 Animated Movies That Make People Cry The Most

4 Animated Movies That Make People Cry The Most

There is something seriously comforting about watching a good animated movie. Perhaps it brings back memories of your childhood, reminiscing about sweets long gone from the modern shelves, and feeling eager anticipation about the experience you are about to have with your family or friends. Watching animated films is often a special time where you experience joy with your own children as they embark on adventures that fill them with wonder.

Whatever the reason, animated films are incredible. When we find ourselves engrossed in a good animated film, we are in no way desensitized to the range of emotions they provoke, equaling any other motion film, animated or not. If we are all honest with ourselves, there has definitely been a number of animations that have made us weep for the screen. Here are 4 favourite tear-jerkers!

Finding Nemo

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    OH THE HEART STRINGS. Finding Nemo has got to be one of the greatest, loveliest, most hilariously animated films of all time. There are so many things about this film that, depending on your sensitivity level, could evoke a tear or two. Dory’s friendship is beautiful, the magical underwater scenes are heart-achingly stunning, but in the end it’s got to be a tie between the **SPOILER ALERT** ending scene of father and son being happily reunited after their journey, and the opening scene, where all of the fish eggs are destroyed except for a single survivor: NEMO.

    The Lion King

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      The circle of life! It moves us all! For a film that was made in the 90s – over twenty years ago! – The Lion King still has the power to move us all. Again, it is hard to dictate as to where the point is in such a powerfully animated movie that is responsible for the waterworks.

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      However, it could very well be when Simba goes down to find Mufasa and tries to pull him to get up, so they can go home. Plenty of tears can be seen streaming down an audience’s face as Simba is suddenly all alone, calling out for help where no one can hear him. A timeless tragedy. Long live Simba.

      Bambi

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        I think this goes without saying that the 1942 Disney film Bambi is one of the longest-loved animated films, with one of the saddest scenes of all time. In fact there are other films, non-animated, that have certainly (comically) mentioned this scene as affecting them deeply in their childhood.

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        This scene in Bambi, is when Bambi’s mother is shot and killed as she and her daughter run for safety from a hunter and his shotgun. “Faster Bambi! Faster! Don’t look back!”  her mother says, and Bambi doesn’t. In fact, she keeps running, finally reaches safety, then looks back, only to find out that her mother couldn’t make it. Devastating.

        Up!

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          This beautiful 3D computer animated film touches on the heart strings when, unlike the other animal films above, we are invited to think about the human condition of escapism. The lessons here touch on how to deal with life when it becomes hard- or in the protagonists case, when we lose our great love. In a beautiful collage of time, we see the main character, Carl, move through his life, reach old age, before tenderly saying goodbye to the woman he loved his entire life. If that doesn’t get your tear ducts smarting, we don’t know what will!

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          All in all, animated films have a running theme: LOVE. Love of a parent, spouse, child, or hero; animated films show us that it is the one thing that connects us and warms us all. So, which one is your favorite?

          Featured photo credit: Quick Picture Tools via quickpicturetools.com

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          Last Updated on April 8, 2020

          Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

          Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

          Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

          Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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          Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

          However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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          The leap happens when we realize two things:

          1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
          2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

          Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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          Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

          My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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          In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

          “Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

          Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

          More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

          Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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