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How Your Handwriting Reveals Your Personality

How Your Handwriting Reveals Your Personality

Your handwriting reveals a lot more about your personality than you might think. In fact, there is a science known as Graphology, which involves studying and analyzing handwriting for personality traits.

Graphology has been around for centuries, with the first known public book emerging in 1622. The word, however, was only coined in the 1870s by Jean Michon of France. The emergence of psychology as a profession at the end of the century is credited with providing greatest advancement in the field. It was only in the 19th century that it truly gained prominence.

It might then be surprising (or not) to note that today Graphology is used for a variety of purposes, such as:

  1. In educational facilities to develop a greater teacher-student relationship and teaching environment.
  2. Screening employees in job interviews; corporate companies are increasingly supplementing traditional interviews with handwriting analysis to ensure they employ the correct person.
  3. In criminal investigations; identifying suspects through handwritten letters.
  4. Obtaining a greater understanding of one’s health. For example, it has been found that a deterioration in the ability to write (identifiable through shaky lettering or an unreadable signature), signals a decline in a person with Alzheimer’s.

Considering the vast array of applications, you may be wondering what this looks like in action.

There are four areas of focus; namely size, slant, pressure and spacing. Through analyzing each of them, certain personality traits can be determined. This of course only touches the tip of the iceberg and, as Kathy McKnight, expert Graphologist indicates, over 5,000 personality traits can be determined through merely analyzing a person’s handwriting.

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To get started, write out a sentence (try: The cow jumps over the moon) and then analyze based on the below.

Size

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    Large letters

    This may indicate that you are an extrovert. You enjoy being around people. You enjoy social gatherings, such as parties and interacting with people.

    Small letters

    This may indicate that you are an introvert. Being intensely focused and having high levels of concentration are your strong points. If you are working on a creative project such as designing a website, you can focus in and ignore outside influences. If you are studying, you can concentrate immensely, to the point where someone may think you are ignoring them when you attempt to interact with them.

    Slant

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      Right Slant

      Your emotions govern you. You are sentimental. You are impulsive. You hold friends and family close. You find yourself expressing your feelings in a way that may seem foolish to others. When you visit a friend, you may run over, clap your hands and give them a big hug.

      Or you may spontaneously decide to climb in your car with no plan and see where the road takes you. Objects you receive as gifts from friends might have a special place in your home somewhere. You treasure them with all your heart.

      No Slant

      You are very pragmatic and logical. You do not let your emotions cloud your decision-making process.

      If a friend visits you at a whim and tells you that you are going on an adventure, your logical mind kicks in and you will analyse the merits of leaving what you are currently doing. You may even want to know exactly where you are going.

      Left Slant

      You enjoy working with objects rather than people as you are reserved. You engage in self-analysis. You might find yourself getting lost in painting or on any other project that involves working with objects.

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      Pressure

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        Heavy Pressure

        Your emotions are strong. You are empathetic. You feel things intensely. This may mean that you are someone who is quick to react, letting your emotions take over.

        For example, if you are out in a club and you see someone in trouble or being harassed you will immediately intervene as your sense of emotion takes over, regardless as to whether there is imminent danger.

        Light Pressure

        You are care-free. You move from place to place. You are a wanderer. You do not let your emotions wear you out. A plane delay is no big fuss for you. You accept the situation for what it is and find something else to keep your mind preoccupied.

        You don’t waste unnecessary time and energy inquiring and trying to understand why there is a problem. You accept things for what they are and realise that moaning will just cause unnecessary stress.

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        Line Spacing

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          Little Spacing

          Time management is not a strong point for you. You find yourself struggling with a routine You may even be late for meetings or find yourself over-scheduling your day. You easily lose track of time.

          Even Spacing

          You are aware of boundaries and are punctual. When a meeting is scheduled for a specific time, you will be there, as you understand that being late is not acceptable. You will not just arrive at someones’ house unexpectedly. You will ask to see whether it is okay first.

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          The Gentle Art of Saying No

          The Gentle Art of Saying No

          No!

          It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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          But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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          What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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          But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

          1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
          2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
          3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
          4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
          5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
          6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
          7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
          8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
          9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
          10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

          Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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