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The 5 Best Exercises For A Rounder, Firmer Bubble Butt

The 5 Best Exercises For A Rounder, Firmer Bubble Butt

Thanks to superstars like Kim Kardashian or the Queen Bee herself–Beyonce–having a round, firm and voluptuous backside is in vogue.

Every women wants a big sexy “bubble butt.”

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This particular body part even has it’s own anthem. Bubble Butt by Major Lazer is the official salute to big booties everywhere.

Besides being able to stop traffic, fill out your favorite pair of jeans or look great in yoga pants, there are some real benefits to having a toned and tight tush.

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Benefits of having a firm “bubble butt”:

The glutes are the fitness center of the body.  They are the largest muscle group and are involved in just about every lower body movement. Strong glutes provide the following functional benefits:

  1. Prevention of knee and back pain
  2. Improved athletic performance and overall mobility
  3. Better regulation of menstrual flow
  4. Reduced risk of injuries
  5. Self confidence boost

The Bubble Butt Workout for Women created by Vitality Advocate shows you how to lift, firm and shape your booty in five simple moves:

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  1. Deep Squats
  2. Straight & Bent Leg Cross Raises
  3. Kick Squats
  4. Single Leg Bridges
  5. Side Squats

This Bubble Butt Workout should be done twice a week and can be modified to suit your individual needs. You can increase the intensity by:

  • Adding weight by holding dumbbells
  • Increasing or decreasing the speed of your reps
  • Shortening the amount of rest time between sets
  • Alternating the order of the exercises

When doing the Bubble Butt Workout, pay special attention to your form. Doing the movements incorrectly could put you at risk for injuries and slow your results.

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When doing squats, try to ensure your knees stay behind your toes and you push through your heels. A common mistake made during this movement is shifting the weight too far forward and pushing through the toes. That small variation adds pressure too the knees and shifts the focus to the quads instead of the glutes.

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Denise Hill

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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