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10 Ways to Protect Your iPhone from Failing or Become Inaccessible

10 Ways to Protect Your iPhone from Failing or Become Inaccessible

Securing data is important to prevent it from being accessed by unauthorized people, as well as intentional destruction. It is important for preventing accidental deletion, corruption, or infection of information. In one way or the other, nowadays we store our lives on smartphones. Therefore, it is necessary to take security seriously.

The following 10 tips will help protect your iPhone and stop prying eyes from spying on your sensitive information.

1. Self Destruct

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self-destruct

    If you seriously want to stop intruders from checking your iPhone data, you can manage your phone setting in such way that it will delete all data if someone is trying to break in. Under the Settings option, you can enable the Erase Data option, which will wipe the phone’s data after ten incorrect attempts at the PIN.

    If you have Touch ID enabled then it allows you three attempts at fingerprint recognition before it will revert back to PIN entry. The good news is, you can always recover deleted data from your iPhone (or any iOS device) if it gets deleted or becomes inaccessible using iPhone data recovery.

    2. Pin or Fingerprint Security

    fingerprints
      Getty Images

      We use our smartphone for a number of things, like email, browsing, banking, and shopping, so it’s dangerous to leave your phone unguarded. Locking the screen will protect your apps and sensitive data from intruders. To enable this, just go to the Settings app on your phone, then select the General tab, then “Touch ID & passcode lock” from the selected option you will be able to turn on either Touch ID fingerprint scanning or a numeric PIN.

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      3. Longer Pass-phrase

      passcode

        The four-digit PIN provides security, but there’s a one-in-10,000 chance that someone will guess it correctly the first time. In order to avoid that, one can opt for the passphrase option. To use this option, go to Settings app, then select “Touch ID & Passcode” and turn off “Simple Passcode”. This helps one in creating a more complex and longer passcode with lower and uppercase letters, symbols, and numbers.

        4. Privacy Settings

        You have a number of apps installed on the phone and they all can access various data or features on your phone. Some will use the microphone or the camera, while some might be able to look at photographs. You must have given them all permission to do this and that at the time, but it is easy to lose track. There are also many apps which are no longer in use, and giving access to those is an unnecessary risk. Thus, go to Settings app, then the Privacy tab, where you can see which app has which privilege. While there, you can turn them on or off.

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        5. Turning Off Notifications

        The feature of viewing a summary of notifications on the lock screen is great, unless it gives away confidential or personal data that could get you into trouble. For example, it will show your calendar for the day, the content of messages you received, and various other personal details.

        6. Disable Siri

        disable-siri

          Siri option can leak data even when your phone is locked, just as was the case with notifications. An intruder who notices your phone unattended can ask all type of questions that could reveal important information. In order to avoid this, go to Settings, then select “Touch ID & passcode”, and then set “allow access when locked” on Siri to “off”.

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          7. Avoid Autofilling

          AutoFill is a useful feature which automatically completes familiar text as you type and remembers important details you often repeat. Therefore, any time you’re given a text box asking for your name, password, username, or credit card details, it fills them in for you. This is great, unless your phone is being used by someone else. Thus, it’s better to turn it off. To do this, go to Settings, then select General, and “Passwords & AutoFill”.

          8. Using Device Finder

          The “Find My iPhone” feature will only help you find your phone in the couch cushions, but if your device disappears, you can put your phone in Lost Mode which locks your screen with a passcode. This app comes with iPhones, but one needs to set it up before the phone is lost. You can look for Find iPhone app in Extras folder. Activation Lock makes it difficult for thieves to sell because the device becomes unusable as it can’t be reactivated without knowing its Apple ID.

          9. Aiseesoft FoneLab

          image

            As the image above shows, FoneLab can recover deleted photos from an iPhone. It also helps recover lost contacts, messages, calendars, call history, notes, reminders, voice memos, Safari bookmarks, voicemail, App data, WhatsApp data, and more from a broken device. Though it makes no difference whether your iPhone was broken, lost, wiped, or crashed due to jail-breaking (or upgrading), FoneLab also helps you restore data from your iTunes backup in a snapshot, whether the data is under Call Log, Messages, Calendar, Reminder, Notes, Safari bookmarks, or any other nodes which was deleted before backing up your device with iTunes.

            10. Software Updates

            Software updates might contain fixes to flaws that might give intruders a way to enter your device. Apple prompts users to get updates and install them only when asked. In case of information thefts, a precaution is better than a cure!

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            Abhay Jeet Mishra

            Writer at Lifehack & Enterested.com

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            Last Updated on May 14, 2019

            8 Replacements for Google Notebook

            8 Replacements for Google Notebook

            Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

            1. Zoho Notebook
              If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
            2. Evernote
              The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
            3. Net Notes
              If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
            4. i-Lighter
              You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
            5. Clipmarks
              For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
            6. UberNote
              If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
            7. iLeonardo
              iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
            8. Zotero
              Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

            I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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            In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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