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Do You Prefer Mountains Or Beaches? Study Says It Reveals Your Personality

Do You Prefer Mountains Or Beaches? Study Says It Reveals Your Personality

Think about your last few holiday destinations. Were they spent loading the car with beach towels, umbrellas, and sandcastle tools? Or did you load in the books, hiking boots, and shawls for the chilly mountain nights?

Studies report that our holiday destinations can assimilate with our personality traits and happiness. There are certain aspects of beach life and certain aspects of mountain life that reflect parts of our core personalities. So the question remains: are you a living-amongst-the-trees person or someone who prefers to frolic in the waves? In other words, do you prefer the mountains or the beach?

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Holiday Personality Types

Studies have shown that those who are more introverted are reportedly more inclined to head to the mountains and retreat into the trees. Those with extroverted personalities are more inclined to enjoy the social aspects and the interactive spaces of beach life. When it comes to geography, our personalities really do come into play.

The study into personality types for specific destinations is called the “person-environment fit.” The association of personality types to certain places is determined by character traits. Introverts prefer secluded places where interaction with others is limited — quiet places. Whereas extroverts will enjoy the beach because they are exposed to people, they are exposed to action and interaction, and they are on display to others, which suits their nature. Should the roles be reversed, both parties would experience discomfort in environments that are not preferable. Other factors, such as age, gender, and race held no significance when determining a mountain dweller or a beach dweller. It was purely down to the personality difference of havingan introverted personality type or an extroverted personality type.

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Beach vs Mountain

These two destination types have similar traits to the assigned character. For example, the mountains are secluded, private places where you may be prone to deep thought. They often facilitate isolation or profound ideas. Beach life, on the other hand, promotes noise, attention, fun, interaction. A beach ismore of a social dwelling where people like to hang out, meet, and be aware of one another.

The mountains seem to be the choice for people who wish to make a solo journey, whereas the beach mightbe the best vacation choice if it’s a time for hanging or holidaying with friends. So, there is also the aspect of why you are going to either of these places to begin with, as opposed to just choosing depending on your character.

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What Comes First: the Character or the Destination?

So, does the introvert seek out the solitude, do they search for the mountains? Or do the mountains call for the introvert? And do extroverts need to be constantly seen by others and parade around inthe beach’s social scene, or does the beach call to the extroverts, to make it the fun-loving place that it is?

Most intriguing was that further studies showed whether or not certain places would geographically nurture or exacerbate personality types. Research identified that open spaces for an extrovert will encourage their behavior. Studies were conducted to try and ascertain piques in our personality types. When monitoring people in open areas compared to people in quiet, leafy retreats, what they instead found was that, although there were minimal changes in the levels of extroversion or introversion, the extroverts were found to have high levels of happiness in the open spaces and the introverts had high levels of happiness after being in the quieter spaces where they could retreat.

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In the end, what we discover is that the settings we surround ourselves with can truly match and be at peace with the our internal scenery.

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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