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Do You Prefer Mountains Or Beaches? Study Says It Reveals Your Personality

Do You Prefer Mountains Or Beaches? Study Says It Reveals Your Personality

Think about your last few holiday destinations. Were they spent loading the car with beach towels, umbrellas, and sandcastle tools? Or did you load in the books, hiking boots, and shawls for the chilly mountain nights?

Studies report that our holiday destinations can assimilate with our personality traits and happiness. There are certain aspects of beach life and certain aspects of mountain life that reflect parts of our core personalities. So the question remains: are you a living-amongst-the-trees person or someone who prefers to frolic in the waves? In other words, do you prefer the mountains or the beach?

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Holiday Personality Types

Studies have shown that those who are more introverted are reportedly more inclined to head to the mountains and retreat into the trees. Those with extroverted personalities are more inclined to enjoy the social aspects and the interactive spaces of beach life. When it comes to geography, our personalities really do come into play.

The study into personality types for specific destinations is called the “person-environment fit.” The association of personality types to certain places is determined by character traits. Introverts prefer secluded places where interaction with others is limited — quiet places. Whereas extroverts will enjoy the beach because they are exposed to people, they are exposed to action and interaction, and they are on display to others, which suits their nature. Should the roles be reversed, both parties would experience discomfort in environments that are not preferable. Other factors, such as age, gender, and race held no significance when determining a mountain dweller or a beach dweller. It was purely down to the personality difference of havingan introverted personality type or an extroverted personality type.

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Beach vs Mountain

These two destination types have similar traits to the assigned character. For example, the mountains are secluded, private places where you may be prone to deep thought. They often facilitate isolation or profound ideas. Beach life, on the other hand, promotes noise, attention, fun, interaction. A beach ismore of a social dwelling where people like to hang out, meet, and be aware of one another.

The mountains seem to be the choice for people who wish to make a solo journey, whereas the beach mightbe the best vacation choice if it’s a time for hanging or holidaying with friends. So, there is also the aspect of why you are going to either of these places to begin with, as opposed to just choosing depending on your character.

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What Comes First: the Character or the Destination?

So, does the introvert seek out the solitude, do they search for the mountains? Or do the mountains call for the introvert? And do extroverts need to be constantly seen by others and parade around inthe beach’s social scene, or does the beach call to the extroverts, to make it the fun-loving place that it is?

Most intriguing was that further studies showed whether or not certain places would geographically nurture or exacerbate personality types. Research identified that open spaces for an extrovert will encourage their behavior. Studies were conducted to try and ascertain piques in our personality types. When monitoring people in open areas compared to people in quiet, leafy retreats, what they instead found was that, although there were minimal changes in the levels of extroversion or introversion, the extroverts were found to have high levels of happiness in the open spaces and the introverts had high levels of happiness after being in the quieter spaces where they could retreat.

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In the end, what we discover is that the settings we surround ourselves with can truly match and be at peace with the our internal scenery.

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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