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5 Growth Hacks That Get Real Traffic to Your Blog

5 Growth Hacks That Get Real Traffic to Your Blog

It’s hard to get, isn’t it?

You’ve read tons of articles on how to get traffic to your blog, but none of them seem to get you as many visitors as you expected. You expected more and you deserve it.

Well, here’s the thing…

Most traffic tactics won’t get you thousands of visitors overnight. They may take time, but they actually work. Your plan should be to pick at least one of them and implement it consistently. If you do that, you’ll unlock traffic that most bloggers only dream of.

Here are 5 growth hacks you can start to implement today to increase your future blog traffic.

1. SEO – Search Engine Optimization

Although SEO takes time to take effect, it is still considered as a growth hack. If you consider the time it takes and the traffic it can possibly get you, it’s really worth it.

Let’s do the math:

It takes 6 hours or more to write an exceptional blog post. To be on the safe side, let’s say 20 hours.

Then, after the post is published it’s time to build links. That means you need to reach out to a number of blogs, begging them to link to your post because it’s better than all the existing ones out there. Usually, you’d look at the blogs linking to your competitors using a tool such as Ahrefs and then try and “steal” their links.

The average response rate for a link building outreach campaign is around 10%, which means you’ll need to reach out to 1,000 bloggers to get around 100 responses. Of course, you may need to reach out to more (or less) depending on the blog post you wrote and what niche you’re in.

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I once reached out to 600 influencers. It took me 4 days to do it, so 1,000 blogs should take around 7-8 days if you’re doing it full-time. Now, let’s add all of that up: 20 hours to write + 8 days outreach = 9 days.

Hopefully, you attempted to rank for a keyword with a decent search volume of over 1,000 searches per month and with an average click through rate of 31% for the 1st result, 14% for the 2nd, and 9.8% for the 3rd. That means:

1st position 310 clicks per month (or 3,720 clicks per year)

2nd position 140 clicks per month (or 1,680 clicks per year)

3rd position 98 clicks per month (or 1,176 clicks per year)

Remember that it took 9 days of hard work, which is pretty good considering we only attempted to rank for a keyword with a search volume of 1,000 searches per month. The higher the search volume, the higher your results will be, as well as the more competitive it’ll be. Keep in mind, it’s recommended not to target keywords with a search volume above 10,000 searches per month as a beginner. As time passes by, you’ll build momentum and you’ll start getting referral traffic (i.e. shares and natural links) resulting in more traffic than you planned.

Key Takeaways:

  • So is SEO hard work? Yes.
  • Does the hard work and effort pay off long term? Yes.
  • Can it be considered as a growth hack? Yes, since the traffic you get is extremely high compared to the time and effort it takes. It’s much better than paying for ads. Since ad traffic will most likely stop after the ad is stopped. On the other hand, organic traffic from Google (or any other search engine) keeps coming for months (or even years) to come.

2. Guest Blogging

Many bloggers and startups have built empires from guest blogging, raking in thousands of email subscribers from just a few guest posts, who then converted to paying customers.

That said, is it the same for everyone?

Of course, not.

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Guest blogging ROI (Return On Investment) is different for everyone. It depends on two things:

  • How good your blog post is.
  • How active the blog audience is.

If your blog post solves a huge problem for the blog’s audience then you’re likely to get a reasonable amount of them clicking on the link in your bio and subscribing to your email list. It’s an extremely good way to grow your blog. Keep in mind that you’ll probably need to write for a few blogs before you find a blog with a high ROI worth writing for. You may also need to hone your writing skills as well.

It takes around 6-20 hours to write an awesome guest post. Therefore, measuring results and refining your list of blogs to write for should be regularly updated unless you can afford to waste hours on guest posts that get you no traffic for the rest of your life.

Key Takeaways:

  • Make sure you research each blog before writing a guest post for them.
  • Don’t settle with just one blog, write for several blogs, then write for the ones that offer a ROI worth your time.

3. Connecting With Influencers

Influencers usually have influence over a large audience. Some influencers send you tons of traffic, while others send you only a trickle of visitors. Many blog owners hail influencer marketing and blogger outreach because of all the traffic it get’s them. Not only do influencers send you traffic, but they also boost your credibility since promoting you is an endorsement.

So, how do you get influencers to send you traffic, and how is this a growth hack?

The way to get them to send you traffic is by building a relationship with influencers beforehand. Don’t ask for a favor before giving value to them several times before. You must be a giver, not a taker. Start your relationship off by giving them value, then at some point they’ll want to reciprocate and give you in return usually by recommending you to their audience. It’s a win-win.

Key Takeaways:

Give value to influencers and you’ll eventually get value in return.

4. Reddit

Many bloggers rely on social media for traffic. It’s true, social media can offer a reasonable amount of traffic; however, the problem with social media is that it takes a lot of time and effort to build a following. Plus, click through rates can be extremely low.

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This is where Reddit comes in. In Reddit you don’t need a following. In fact, you can’t even build one. You’re judged based on what you post. Furthermore, you can post in front of thousands of targeted users from day one. Reddit can get you over 10,000 visitors a month if you do it right. Granted, Reddit users (or Redditors) can be fussy and hard to please. They hate self-promotion. They are also ready to call you out and hurt your feelings or even get you shadow banned.

So, what’s a blogger like yourself to do with angry Redditors?

Well, truth be told, you’re going to have haters all of the time. If you can’t handle hurtful comments, then growing a blog might not be your thing. Look for another career. On the other hand, if you can take a few harsh comments then here’s what to do:

Step 1: Create an account on Reddit (if you don’t have one already).

Step 2: Unsubscribe to all subreddits that you’re not interested in, since you’ll automatically be subscribed to some popular subreddits after you create an account.

Step 3: Search and subscribe to all relevant subreddits that could possibly have your target audience.

Step 4: Become an active and regular Redditor. You must be helpful. I usually spend time answering people’s questions and providing feedback to people in the /r/entrepreneur subreddit and others. Do this regularly. Once you build 1,000 link karma, have 10+ post and comments, then you’re good to move on to the next step.

Step 5: Share your links every once in a while, whilst continuing to do whatever you’re doing in Step 4. Don’t stop offering value to subreddits. Getting 1,000 links karma and 10+ posts and comments doesn’t mean you’re promoted, it’s just what makes you eligible to post your own content. That said, remember not to overdo it. Most importantly, make sure your posts are valuable. Look at the previous top posts to get an idea of what that particular subreddit likes. Post your own stuff once every 3-4 posts.

Your goal is to become a top post in that particular subreddit in order to get the thousands of visitors per month.

Key Takeaways:

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  • Reddit is harsh but worth it.
  • Redditors are real people. If you help them and you do it often, they’ll appreciate it and you’ll get traffic.

5. Printed Letters

Huh, printed letters? But, don’t they cost money? Sure they do, but they also work.

You can send out printed letters (a.k.a. snail mail) to inactive subscribers, current customers, or to acquire new leads. You don’t need to write a masterful sales letter either. A nice personal note telling people to visit your blog for a special free offer should do the trick. Like everything else, make sure you send to a small group of 250 people first before mailing thousands of people.

It should cost you no more than $1 per letters, so it should cost you no more than $250 for your first sample campaign of 250 contacts. The odds of people reading your snail mail is much higher than them reading your email newsletter. Many bloggers would rather pay for PPC ads instead of snail mail, which means you’ll easily stand out from the crowd of electronic mailing bloggers. You’ll also be more memorable. In return, your subscribers will likely open your emails resulting in a higher open rate than usual.

Let’s say after sending out 250 letters, only 150 became new subscribers. If you have a good autoresponder series that sells a low priced product like an ebook at $10, you’ll only need 25 out of 150 new subscribers to buy your ebook to cover the full costs of your campaign – and that’s just your first low-priced product.

Make sure your campaigns are paying for themselves before you go for another one. If each campaign pays for itself then you can gain thousands of subscribers through traditional old school mail. Give it a try and see for yourself. You don’t need to be a multi-million dollar company to do this either since just a few hundred bucks from your wallet will do the trick.

Key Takeaways:

  • Email inboxes are crowded compared to mail boxes. That’s why the open rates are higher.
  • Create a personal note with a call to action for people to get access to your free lead magnet. Think of it as your printed squeeze page.
  • Create an autoresponder that will sell to new subscribers to make up for your campaign costs.

Conclusion

Growth hacking is anything that leads to your business/blog’s growth. Try at least one of these 5 tactics and you’ll see your blog traffic increasing soon enough. Be patient. Be persistent.

Featured photo credit: Shutterstock via shutterstock.com

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Zak Mustapha

Blogger & Marketer

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Last Updated on August 14, 2020

How to Find a Career That Is Right For You

How to Find a Career That Is Right For You

There are thousands of careers to choose from. No wonder finding the one that’s right for you can feel like a guessing game.

Choosing or changing careers can be scary. Even if it’s right for you now, you might wonder, who says it’ll still be a fit in the future?

The truth is, you have to start somewhere. Whether you’re looking for a first job out of college or need a new career, follow this process to find the right one for you:

1. List Out Careers You Could Pursue

It sounds simple, but it’s good advice: Start with what you like. Even before you begin looking for the right career, you probably have an idea of what you’re interested in.

Next, make a second list, this one including your strengths. If you aren’t sure whether you’re actually good at something, ask someone close to you who’ll give you a truthful answer.

Once your lists are made, cross-reference them: What do you like to do and do well?

In a third list, rank these. If you’re skilled at something you don’t particularly like, for instance, that should fall lower on the list.

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2. Take a Career Assessment

Standardized tests shouldn’t make decisions for you, but they can get you pointed in the right direction. Career assessment tests gauge your abilities and interests and make recommendations for career paths based on the answers you give.[1]

Before reviewing your results, take a break. Getting some perspective can help you see whether your answers were guided by your mood. Look at the percentage match and ask yourself whether you could see yourself doing the work of the career or role every day.

For example, if your responses emphasized helping others, the test might point you to a medical career. However, if you don’t want to work in a hospital or clinical environment, you might cut that option or place it lower on your list.

3. Sweat the Details

Every career has gratifying and frustrating things about it. Before you choose one, you need to be clear on those. Reading reviews and job descriptions you find related to each career, make a list of its pros and cons.

There are a lot of factors to think through. Key questions to ask yourself include:

  • What are the hours required by this type of work? Can they be flexible?
  • What skills are required? Do I possess them, or would I be willing to learn them?
  • What are the education requirements? Can I afford to go back to school?
  • How much do jobs in the field pay? Is the payscale top-heavy or evenly distributed?
  • What does job growth in this sector look like? Are they traditional or contracted roles?
  • Are opportunities in the field available in my area? If not, would I be willing to move?
  • Would I be working solo or on a team?

In answering these questions, you’ll find yourself crossing a lot of careers off your list. Remember, that’s a good thing: You’d rather find out a career isn’t right for you now than after you’ve put yourself on that path.

4. Find the Sweet Spot

The crux of the career question is this: What’s the “sweet spot” between your interests and strengths and the market’s needs? The greater the overlap, the better.

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Be warned that you’ll have to compromise. Perhaps you enjoy working with animals, but there’s no demand for that line of work in your area. You might be good at math, but you wouldn’t want to crunch numbers in a cubicle for a living. Finding balance is crucial.

5. Start Networking

What’s the best way to get the real story about the careers you’re interested in? Talking to professionals in the field.

Where should you find these people?

  • Reach out to local businesses.
  • Scour your social media networks, particularly LinkedIn.
  • Ask a past employer for recommendations.
  • Sign up for industry events and conferences.

Schedule a short interview with each of your new connections. Ask them to weigh in on the comments you see online. Every role and company is a bit different, so don’t be surprised if their responses don’t align.

Regardless of who you find or what they say, write it down. If one interviewee’s responses differ wildly from online responses, chat with someone else in the field. Do your best to find out what’s the rule and what’s the exception.

6. Shadow and Volunteer

As valuable as networking can be, you need a firsthand glimpse of the work. If you hit it off with one of your interviewees, ask to do some job shadowing. Sitting beside someone as they work can help you understand not just the pay and the responsibilities but also the culture and work environment associated with each career.

Job shadowing is a good way to get your feet wet before taking a career plunge. If you felt uninterested or unhappy during your shadowing experience, it’s a good sign that you should ponder a different career path. If your shadowing experience made you want to come back for more, you may have found your calling.

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Volunteer work is an alternative to job shadowing that can get you the experience you need as you analyze your career options. As a volunteer, you can be more flexible with your time and get opportunities you wouldn’t find elsewhere.

7. Sign Up for Classes

Many careers have an academic component that you can’t ignore. If you decide you want to be a lawyer, for instance, you might want to know you can survive law school first.

Sign up for an introductory class or two related to each career you’re interested in. The earlier you do this, the better. If you’re still in college, the class will count as an elective and may be covered by your scholarship, but if not, look for a community college option to keep costs low.

Taking a single class is not the same as earning a degree in the field. With that said, it’s a good way to test the waters before you invest thousands of dollars.

If the content interests you and you look forward to class each week, that’s a good sign. If you start dreading the class or choose to drop it, focus your attention elsewhere.

8. Enter the Gig Economy

Contracted work is a great “try it before you buy it” career tactic. Skipping to an entry-level role requires more commitment than you might want to give while you’re still investigating your options. The gig economy offers the best of both worlds: paid work as well as flexibility.[2]

Gig workers take work from companies or individuals that do not directly employ them. Plumbers and artists are good examples. Rather than receiving a regular paycheck, they sell their services by the task or deliverable.

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In the gig economy, you aren’t bound by long-term agreements. If you don’t like the experience, you can simply move on.

You never know if you’ll enjoy something until you try it. And because contractors work with professionals in the field, gig workers naturally get networking and shadowing opportunities.

9. Market Yourself

As you zero in on your dream career, there’s one final test you can use to find out whether you’ll be successful: marketing yourself as a candidate for hire. Whether you get bites is a key indicator of how you’ll fare in the field.

Beware that, as someone without much experience in the field, you’re going to get a lot of rejections. Don’t be discouraged. If you get two interviews out of 50 applications, think of it as two opportunities you didn’t have before to find your ideal career.

Just as important as outreach is a good inbound strategy. Set up a website, and post your portfolio on it. Describe your dream job on your social media.

Recruiters are constantly on the lookout for candidates that fit their company. The more exposure you get, the more people will be interested in what you have to offer. Put yourself out there, and you just might find the perfect fit.

Don’t Give Up!

Nobody ever said it was easy to find a career that’s right for you. Finding one is tough enough, and even then, you may find yourself looking for a new field ten years into your career.

Whatever you want from your professional life, you have to be willing to put in the time. Don’t hesitate, and don’t give up. Start your search today.

More Tips on How to Find a Career

Featured photo credit: Saulo Mohana via unsplash.com

Reference

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