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Have You Been Angry When Feeling Hungry? Science Says This Is Normal

Have You Been Angry When Feeling Hungry? Science Says This Is Normal

When we feel hungry, our brains are sending out signals that we need fuel. The more this goes on, the hungrier we get, and we begin to feel angry. More often than not we attribute this to our selves and our own personality. We assume anger is a character trait, and being angry when hungry is no exception. What many people don’t realize is that this particular feeling of anger takes rise for scientific reasons, and not just because of who we are. There are bodily functions – a process – that happens within us when we need food and we don’t get it. These functions lead us to feelings of anger when hungry. The good news is that it is normal! Here’s why.

What Happens To Your Brain When You’re Feeling Hungry

Studies show that the answer is related to the bodily functions and what happens inside us when we are ready or need to eat. Everything we consume, the proteins, the fats, the carbs, these are all digested and form into sugars, amino acids and free fatty acids which are then absorbed into our bloodstream. These important nutrients are then passed into our tissue, muscles, and other important areas, and help us function as healthy human beings – they are particularly good for energy.

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As time goes by and we haven’t eaten anything for a while, this process slows down, and we begin to feel a drop in our energy due to a drop in this cycle. One of the sugars created in this process (glucose) has a pretty big name in this game! If glucose levels drop far enough, the brain perceives this as a threat to your very existence, and so it sends out a signal warning. The brain is different to the other organs, in that it needs glucose as its primary source of energy to work as it needs to. The other organs rely on other nutrients as well, but the brain relies heavily on glucose. When it fears the glucose isn’t coming, the brain perceives it is a threat. There is a serious co-dependency between the brain and glucose!

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    It’s Not Your Fault!

    So you see, this is where the hanger kicks in. It is the brain’s way of making you do what it wants, and give it what it needs. Some evidence of this process? Recall the last time you were doing something when you felt really hungry. Did it seem a little foggy? Were ideas, words, functions, not coming readily, at the speed you required or were used to? Were you slurring slightly? This is the brain at work when glucose levels are low. Some things can become much more difficult than they would otherwise be in this situation.

    When all this happens and we try to behave in society as we are generally expected to, things can go wrong! And this is the reason why! We might snap at people, or not work to our best ability when we are hungry. That’s why it is important to fill your body with good, nutritional food, when it needs it (before you become too hungry as digestion takes time). Otherwise we risk endangering everything from our work lives, to the relationships in our personal lives. And remember – it is normal to feel hangry. So don’t beat yourself up too much. Just grab a snack!

    Featured photo credit: theconversation.com via theconversation.com

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    Last Updated on June 19, 2019

    How to Practice Positive Meditation in 2 Simple Steps

    How to Practice Positive Meditation in 2 Simple Steps

    Just by simply spending some effort and time, staying positive every day can be easily achieved. All that is required is a fraction of your time, 10-15 minutes a day to cultivate the positive you!

    But first, what is really positive thinking? Do you have to be in an upbeat, cheerful and enthusiastic mood all day to be positive minded?

    No. Positive thinking simply means the absence of negative thoughts and emotions – in other words, inner peace!

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    When you are truly at peace within yourself, you are naturally thinking positively. You don’t have to fight off negative thoughts, or search desperately for more positive thoughts. It just happens on its own. And here are 2 positive thinking meditation tips to empower you:

    1. Relax as You Meditate

    A powerful, simple yet rarely used technique is meditation. Meditation doesn’t have to take the form of static body posture. It can be as simple as sitting in a comfortable chair listening to soothing music. Or performing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing exercises.

    Meditation is all about letting go of stressful or worrisome thoughts. That’s it! If you spend just a few minutes per day feeling relaxed and peaceful, you automatically shift your mind into a more positive place. When you FEEL more relaxed, you naturally THINK more positively!

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    Start with a short period of time, like 5 or 10 minutes a day. You can meditate first thing in the morning, during your lunch break, right before you go to bed at night, or any time. The most important thing is to consciously let go of unproductive thoughts and feelings. Just let them go for those few minutes, and you may decide not to pick them back up again at all!

    2. Practice Daily Affirmations

    Positive affirmations can be used throughout the day anywhere and at anytime you need them, the more you use them the easier positive thoughts will take over negative ones and you will see benefits happening in your life.

    What are affirmations? Affirmations are statements that are used in a positive present tense language. For example, “Every day, in every way, I’m getting better, better and better” is a popular affirmation used by the late Norman Vincent Peale.

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    So how does one go about using positive affirmations in everyday life? Let’s look at some guidelines to follow when reciting your daily affirmations.

    1. Use first person pronouns in your message (I)
    2. Use present tense (I have)
    3. Use positive messages (I am happy)
    4. Repeat your affirmations on a consistent basis

    Affirmations have to be said with conviction and consistency. Start your day by saying your affirmations out loud. It wouldn’t take more than 5 minutes to repeat your affirmations; yet when done consistently, these positive affirmations will seep into the subconscious mind to cultivate the new positive you.

    Here’s an example of a “success affirmation” you can use on a daily basis:

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    I am successful in everything I do. Every venture I get into returns wealth to me. I am constantly productive. I always perform to the full potential I have and have respect for my abilities.
    My work is always given positive recognition. I augment my income constantly. I always have adequate money for everything I require. I spend my money prudently always. My work is always rewarded.

    You can find more examples here: 10 Positive Affirmations for Success that will Change your Life

    Remember, affirmations work on the basis of conviction and consistency. Do yourself a favor and make a commitment to see this through.

    Begin practicing these positive thinking tips right now. And I wish you continued empowerment and growth on your positive thinking journey.

    More About Positive Thinking

    Featured photo credit: Jacob Townsend via unsplash.com

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