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Female NASCAR Drivers: How Cool Is That?

Female NASCAR Drivers: How Cool Is That?

Women in NASCAR aren’t as unusual as you might think. Unlike many other racing events, NASCAR didn’t disallow female drivers from participation since its beginning in 1949. However, throughout the 20th century, female NASCAR drivers were few and far between — more of an exception than a rule.

It wasn’t until 2004 and the foundation of the Drive for Diversity program that the number of female NASCAR drivers really began to reach significant proportions. This program serves as a way to attract more representatives from women in minorities to actively engage in racing, inviting a new round of non-traditional drivers to participate year after year. Nevertheless, there are already many important names on the list of female NASCAR drivers, and today we’d like to tell you about some of them.

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1. Sarah Christian

Perhaps Sarah Christian didn’t have a stellar driving career, but still, she was the first woman to participate in a NASCAR race — and in the very first race at that. She was married to fellow racecar driver Frank Christian, which makes for another first — they were the first married couple driving team to ever compete against each other in the same race.

2. Janet Gunthrie

Janet Gunthrie was the first female NASCAR driver after the retirement of Sarah Christian, but this is far from being the only thing she is famous for. An avid racer and sports car fan, she had been racing since 1963, but only joined the sport full time in 1972. Just four years later, she was invited to participate in Indianapolis 500, becoming the first female race driver to qualify and participate in it as well as the Daytona 500. She is certainly the best-known female NASCAR driver of the 20th century.

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3. Jennifer Jo Cobb

Jennifer Jo Cobb boasts more than 25 year of racing experience and over a hundred NASCAR World Truck Series starts. According to her, she always used her gender as a motivation to strive for success. Since the very beginning, she has been inspired by the idea that she would have to work somewhat harder than others to overcome being different if she wanted to amount to anything. If her career so far is a thing to judge by, this motivation certainly did its job.

4. Danica Patrick

As of today, NASCAR can boast of having one of the most well-known female drivers among its ranks — Danica Patrick. She inherited a passion for cars and driving from her parents: her mother was a mechanic while her father actively took part in various racing activities. It wouldn’t be an exaggeration to say that Danica Patrick has already managed to leave a huge mark in the history of female racing. She was the fourth woman to participate in the Indianapolis 500, but there are a lot of firsts as well: after winning in the Indy Japan 300 in 2008, she became the first woman to finish first in an Indy race. In 2013, during the Sprint Cup series, she became the first woman to win a NASCAR Sprint Cup pole and the second woman after Janet Gunthrie to have competed both in the Indianapolis 500 and the Daytona 500.

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As a result of relentless work on the part of both NASCAR organizers and a number of talented and hardworking women, the sport slowly but steadily is becoming more diversified. It is no longer a surprise to see women driving the top fastest cars. There are already many more names on the list of female NASCAR drivers and there are going to be many more in the years to come, which is an inspiring and gratifying thing to see.

These female NASCAR drivers deserve respect for their talent and courage. They all make great examples to follow!

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Featured photo credit: wallpapercow.com via wallpapercow.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

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Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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