Advertising
Advertising

A Personal Touch Matters in Your Store and Online

A Personal Touch Matters in Your Store and Online

Businesses have long ago found out that their clients like it when they are treated as individuals, and not as faceless sources of ready cash. Therefore, a personal touch always went a long way in making positive impression, in increasing sales and client return rates. In brick-and-mortar shops, achieving it isn’t all that difficult to implement – a skilled sales manager can find a way to effectively communicate with any client. However, for online shops this approach remained problematic for a very long time, for the very nature of arrangement made contacts between the store and the client anonymous to a degree.

Nevertheless, technology doesn’t stand in one place, and today we more and more often hear about the new ways to personalize your website to better engage your clients.

Advertising

For quite a while, personalization in stores was limited to things like gathering information about client’s preferences and displaying lists of items similar to ones they’ve already bought to try and attract their attention to them.

It all changed with the start of mobile revolution and the emergence of responsive web design.

Advertising

It used to be that all web designers and webmasters had to think about was making websites look good and function well on desktop computers. Then came the mobile revolution, and everything changed. People started accessing websites from scores of different types of devices, all using different software, with screens of varying sizes.

Responsive web design, specifically aimed at ensuring a positive mobile experience, is an approach to design that provides an optimal viewing experience, no matter what device a user is accessing a site on. Today, there are no serious web design companies that don’t work with this paradigm in mind, and such prominent companies as Duda dedicate all of their efforts to building products aimed making the creation of these sites as simple as possible.

Advertising

To take it a step further, the most cutting edge companies also focus on something called website personalization, that enables a web designer to ensure that a website visitor also receives an individualized experience based on things like time of day, date, number of previous visits to the site, a user’s physical location and more.

Such an approach doesn’t simply change the way the site is displayed depending on the device, but effectively changes what content the visitors gets to see depending on any number of factors you want. You define certain triggers changing the information provided to the customer, such as time of day, date, the number of visits attributed to this customer, previous purchases, the site from which the visitor came to you, and so on – and define beforehand what your visitor is going to see. You may engage first-time visitors with special welcome videos, or improve weekend and holiday sales by giving discount coupons to those visiting you at those times.

Advertising

When a visitor sees that you’ve paid special attention to them, that you keep your website up to date, that you are interested in improving their experience, you are certain to stand out, at the very least when compared to stores that treat all their visitors in the same manner.

Higher conversion rates are the least you can expect. In perspective, it may change your entire way of dealing with clients and customers’ attitude towards your shop. A lot is said today about how the most promising approach to business is to turn a store from a place where people go for purchases to a place where people go for an experience – a pleasant experience of having your wishes anticipated, being treated to pleasant surprises now and then, and, in general, being regarded as a friend and a member of a friendly community rather than a walking wallet.

Those who will embrace this policy early on are going to prosper; those unwilling to do so now are likely to soon wish they had.

Featured photo credit: Ed Gregory/stokpic.com via stokpic.com

More by this author

What do you know about Internet of Things (IoT)? Omega 3 food Eat Your Way To Perfect Skin! Include These 10+ High Omega 3 Foods In Your Meal! divorce 6 Important Divorce Guidelines: Getting Out With Your Skin Intact 7 Helpful Tools to Choose the Perfect Christmas Vacation Destination 5 Solutions to Lower Back Pain Using Our Grannies’ Experience

Trending in Money

1 How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt 2 How to Use Debt Snowball to Get out from a Financial Avalanche 3 How Personal Finance Software Helps You Get More Out of Your Money 4 The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind 5 How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

Advertising

Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

Advertising

I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

Advertising

Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

Advertising

So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

Read Next