Advertising
Advertising

New Age Of Technology: Self-Driving Cars

New Age Of Technology: Self-Driving Cars

We sure do hear a lot about Google and its self-driving cars lately. What seemed like an idea for a sci-fi movie just a decade ago is rapidly moving on to become reality – and it doesn’t really matter what one thinks about it. We live in the age of technology, with progress in this field moving at breakneck speeds. What seemed impossible twenty (or even ten) years ago is an integral part of our lives today. It is quite certain that ten years from now we are going to laugh at how tame our suggestions about the future were.

However, although there is a lot of talk about self-driving cars, I found that I (as well as most of my acquaintances) actually now very little about them, except for the fact that they are, well, cars that somehow drive themselves. I decided to remedy that and read up a little on the subject.

Advertising

The self-driving car is an extremely ambitious project by Google, aimed at changing the way we perceive individual transportation in the future. Seeing that the absolute majority of traffic-related accidents and deaths stem from human mistakes, Google intends to create cars that would eliminate this threat and allow everybody to be independent in their movements irrespective of age, physical condition, or ability to drive. People who previously were forced to stay in one place or be dependent on others for their transportation (elderly, visually impaired, children, etc.) would be able to drive wherever they wanted –  easily, quickly, and more importantly, completely safely. All that is necessary is to input a location and press a button, the rest is done by the car itself.

Advertising

Very well, but how exactly is it done? What is inside this car that you are supposed to entrust your life to? The car is equipped with sensors capable of detecting all kinds of objects at considerable distance, allowing the AI controlling the car to navigate streets while safely avoiding collisions. Of course, Google cars are currently in the prototype stage , but they do exist and have been undergoing extensive road-testing for quite a while already. By now, their cars have covered almost 1.5 million miles, with only a handful of minor accidents. The vehicle at fault was usually a manually-driven car they collided with. Nevertheless, Google publishes all the traffic incidents and claims they are going to be used as learning experience in further perfection of their AI.

Advertising

Google cars are not the first attempt at creating a self-driving car – not by a long shot. Actually, the first autonomous vehicles date back to the 1980s; however, they never left the prototype stage and their introduction was never attempted at such a large scale. Furthermore, knowing Google’s reputation, it is probably safe to assume that in the very foreseeable future we may encounter real self-driving cars moving along our streets en masse that won’t actually be that unbelievable a sight.

One thing is for certain; we live in the age of rapidly changing lifestyle paradigms. Those who are skeptical about self-driving cars today should think about the mobile revolution. It brought to us the world in which the majority of people are connected to the Internet around the clock by means of portable devices, which can be used as anything from phones to personal workout assistants. This would’ve seemed preposterous or incredibly far-fetched just a couple of decades ago; however, today’s smartphones, apps, and constant online status are absolutely natural conditions of life for the vast majority of people. It is very likely that the same fate awaits self-driving cars. The best thing we can do is adapt to these changes.

Featured photo credit: flickr.com via flickr.com

Advertising

More by this author

Melissa Burns

Entrepreneur

Wealthy, Successful People Who Choose Less over More: 10 Real-Life Stories of Minimalists If You Want to Succeed in Life, You Need to Find Your True Calling First Why Do We All Feel Empty Sometimes Everything We Can Learn from the Most Famous Entrepreneurs Around the World YouTube Blogger 4 Pillars of Becoming a Successful YouTube Blogger

Trending in Product & Gadget

1 Check Out These 5 Air Purifiers If You Want Your Home Smelling Fresh 2 Never Fall Asleep On The Wheel Again 3 Misplaced Your Items? Get This Search Party 4 8 Important Factors of Website Development and Designing 5 7 of the Best Marketplaces for Website Flipping

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

Advertising

In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

Advertising

Advertising

Read Next