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Turn Off The TV And Do These 6 Productive Things

Turn Off The TV And Do These 6 Productive Things

According to a recent report, the average adult American spends more than five hours watching television every single day. That equates to roughly 35 hours per week. In other words, you’re probably spending almost as much time watching TV as you are working.

What if you were able to cut back on your TV habits and instead do something productive with this time? Well, give the following hacks a try and you’ll see just how much more productive you can be on a daily basis.

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1. Read a Book

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    (Photo by Moyan Brenn)

    Reading is something most of us enjoy, yet we never seem to get around to picking a book up off the shelf. Well, imagine how many books you could read if you spent a couple hours reading each night. You could probably go through three or four books a month. Not only is reading better for your mind, but it also provides you with valuable information and insights into different topics, which makes you a more interesting and well-rounded person.

    2. Cook a Healthy Meal

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      (Photo by Moyan Brenn)

      TV watching and unhealthy eating go hand-in-hand. When people are camped out on the couch, they don’t have time to cook. Therefore, they rely on frozen dinners and fast food. In fact, you could argue that the entire concept of pre-packaged foods – once called TV dinners – is designed around nighttime television watching. By cutting out the TV, you can spend more time cooking healthy meals. Not only will this allow you to learn new cooking skills, but it will also lead to a healthier life. If you have a partner or children, you can enlist them to help you in the kitchen, creating a good teaching and bonding opportunity that you would have otherwise missed.

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      3. Get Some Exercise

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        (Photo by markeybo<./a>)

        Now that you’ve got healthy eating down, you can adopt an exercise regimen to lose those excess pounds and get in shape. Take a run after work, lift weights at the gym, or take a yoga class. In the same amount of time it would take you to watch an episode of Law and Order, you can finish an excellent calorie-burning workout. Not bad, eh?

        4. Take an Online Course

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          (Photo by Jinho Jung)

          With an extra 30-35 hours in your weekly schedule, you could sign up for an online course and learn a new skill, obtain a new certification, or potentially earn a new degree. There are thousands of online learning opportunities and your time will be much better spent in front of the computer than the TV.

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          5. Get a Head Start on Work

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            (Photo from Pexels)

            Are you stressed when you show up to work in the morning? Do you find it difficult to head home at a decent hour? Well, you can make the following day much easier by getting a head start the night before. Knock out menial tasks while at home and you’ll find that you’re able to accomplish important things when you’re in the office.

            6. Get a New Hobby

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              (Photo by Jenn)

              Finally, why not get a new hobby? Whether it’s writing, drawing, gardening, playing guitar, flying planes, or anything in between, a few extra hours a week should be plenty of time to try something new. You might even make some new friends in the process!

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              What are you waiting for?

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                (Photo by Dennis Skley)

                Nobody is saying that TV is evil. We all have our favorite shows and channels and there’s nothing wrong with that. However, the simple fact of the matter is that the average American adult is spending way too much time watching TV.

                By reducing the amount of time you spend mindlessly watching shows and using this time to do productive things, your life can become much happier and healthier.

                Featured photo credit: Tracy Thomas via unsplash.com

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                Anna Johansson

                Anna specializes in entrepreneurship, technology, and social media trends.

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                Last Updated on March 23, 2021

                Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

                Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

                One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

                The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

                You need more than time management. You need energy management

                1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

                How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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                I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

                I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

                2. Determine your “peak hours”

                Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

                Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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                My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

                In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

                Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

                3. Block those high-energy hours

                Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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                Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

                If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

                That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

                There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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                Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

                Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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