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4 Reasons People Quit High-Paying Jobs

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4 Reasons People Quit High-Paying Jobs

Walking away from a high-paying job can be very difficult. After all, high-paying jobs tend to be well-respected by society and come with a sense of security. While many people spend decades feeling more and more frustrated and stifled in their careers, some people quit their high-paying jobs, choosing to follow a different path that is more satisfying.

Here are some of the reasons people quit high-paying jobs.

1. They crave more freedom

Some high-paying jobs offer little freedom and flexibility. Due to the nature of certain careers, some employees in high-power positions are always “on,” and find it difficult to leave work at work. Some workers craving more freedom end up leaving their careers, in pursuit of a freedom-based lifestyle.

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If this is you, choose a career that fits into your ideal life.

Millions of people choose their careers and then try to fit their lives around their careers, squeezing their lives into weeknights and weekends, when a much better idea is deciding what kind of lifestyle you want to live and fitting your career into your ideal lifestyle. Do you want a job in a traditional work setting or a work-from-anywhere career? Do you want a 9-5 schedule or flexible hours?

If you enjoy your current career but would love to have more freedom, talk to your boss about working remotely, even if it’s one day per week to start. Or, instead of 5 days per week, ask if you could work 4 longer days per week. Working 4 days per week means less time commuting each week, and 3-day weekends would give you more freedom to do things outside of work.

2. Their priorities change

Sometimes, people leave high-paying careers due to their priorities changing. Some highly successful people change paths when they become parents or when they encounter unexpected life events such as a tragic illness or the loss of a spouse. When major life-changing events occur, people often reflect on what’s truly important to them, and sometimes as a result they end up changing career directions.

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If this is you, be honest with yourself about your priorities.

If your priorities have changed, it’s important to make your own choices and not feel stuck to your career just because it was a good fit for you in the past. It’s important to think about why you do the work you do. Is your goal to leave a strong financial legacy, to make a specific impact on the world, or to do fulfilling work that uses your best strengths?

If you’re feeling restless, it’s important to pay attention to that restlessness. Just because a job is high-paying and well-respected by society, and just because it suited you well in the past, doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the right job for you right now. As you consider your future career path, I want you to make your own choices and choose a career that enables you to focus your life on your priorities.

3. They are searching for more fulfilling work

We spend decades of the best years of our lives at work, so why shouldn’t we do work that is incredibly fulfilling to us? When we do work that lights us up, that allows us to maximize our strengths, focus our lives on what matters most to us, and make the impact we desire to make on the world, work can be awesome and very fulfilling.

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If this is you, seek your passion.

It’s great when you can find and do work that lights you up. As Steve Jobs said, “The only way to do great work is to love what you do.” If you are looking for your passion, check out this free workbook. When you are passionate about your work, it’s seriously possible to love Monday mornings. It takes self-discovery and massive action, but it’s possible for you to design a career that you absolutely love.

4. They want to develop their leadership skills

According to a Business Insider article, a recent Global Millennials survey conducted by Deloitte uncovered a new reason many people desire to change jobs: dissatisfaction with how their leadership skills are being developed.

If this is you, talk to your boss.

Depending on your job, you might be able to really develop your leadership skills without leaving your company. See if there are events you could plan, a special project you could lead, or people you could mentor in your current company.

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Finally, it’s important to remember that even if you’re not a huge fan of your job, you have the ability to make a difference in the world, starting today. You have the ability to brighten someone’s day, right where you are. Never underestimate the ability you have in your current situation to make a difference for the people around you.

Featured photo credit: Benjamin Child via unsplash.com

More by this author

Dr. Kerry Petsinger

Entrepreneur, Mindset & Performance Coach, & Doctor of Physical Therapy

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