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5 Cyber Security Tips for Bloggers

5 Cyber Security Tips for Bloggers

The rise of social media has resulted in a rise of aspiring bloggers. This is partly because the ability to share content with the masses instantaneously has helped the blogging community by providing the means necessary for their blogs to be seen, read, and consistently followed.

Another reason social media has created more bloggers is that “star” accounts on Instagram and Facebook often lead to full time blogs for the individuals who run them and would like a larger space to share longer form content on a regular basis.

Whether you’re a seasoned blogger or are just getting started on your mission to join the blogger community, you could stand to benefit from a few cyber security tips to keep your content and personal information safe as you build your blog and its audience. With a myriad of ways hackers can attack your blog these days, it’s important that you know how to stay as safe as possible and have the tools necessary to recover should an attack occur.

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Here are five of my top cyber security tips for current and aspiring bloggers. Enjoy!

1.  Avoid unencrypted WiFi networks

As easy as it may be to hook up to the free WiFi at your local coffee shop, it can also be very dangerous to your blog. If you prefer to work on your blog in a remote workplace, be sure that the WiFi network you connect to is password protected. Unprotected (unencrypted) networks leave your device vulnerable to hackers who could potentially use the open network to view your online activity.

Asking for the official WiFi network and password will also help you avoid connecting to fake accounts set up by hackers.

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2. Refrain from storing passwords in your browser

One of the most common cyber security mistakes made by internet users today is storing login information in a browser. Although it’s convenient to have your username and password automatically entered when you visit WordPress or the login portal for your CMS (content management system), it puts your blog at serious risk.

Instead of storing your CMS login info in your browser, store it in a secure password storage location. Wired has a solid list of free options for this. In addition to finding a safe place for your login info, be sure to create a strong password for your blog that is different from passwords you’ve used on other sites.

3. Use a private network

Private networks or VPNs (virtual private networks) help secure your browsing sessions by encrypting the traffic between your device and the server. When you’re working on your blog, be sure to use a VPN to keep your site safe. Another important part of this is to only visit HTTPS sites to ensure that each site you visit is secure.

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4. Keep your security software up-to-date

Security software is absolutely essential for bloggers. Start by finding an effective security software program that fits within your budget. Once you’ve got the software installed, it’s essential that you keep it up to date. The longer a device runs with outdated software, the more vulnerable it is to attacks.

It may be tempting to ignore update notifications, but it will be well worth taking a few minutes to update your device’s security software when you consider the alternative which would be to lose all of the work you’ve done on your blog to a preventable online attack.

5. Prepare to quickly recover from attacks

Even if you take every possible precaution to avoid an attack on your blog, the unfortunate truth is that you are never completely immune to attacks. Although taking the necessary cyber security steps will significantly decrease your potential for an attack on your blog, preparing for the worst will help you quickly recover and gain back control over your work as quickly as possible if an attack occurs.

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Depending on the CMS you choose, necessary preparation will vary. For one of the most commonly used systems, WordPress, it will be important to know how to bring your site back to life after it’s been shut down, and secure your site with a new password and two step authentication for added security.

Now that you’ve got the information you need, it’s time to start securing your work. After all, you’ve spent a lot of time and effort creating your personal brand online, why not take a few extra steps to make sure it’s as protected as possible? If you have any additional cyber security tips or have questions about how to secure your blog, I’d love to hear them! Let me know in the comments below.

Featured photo credit: Getty via istockphoto.com

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Last Updated on April 9, 2020

5 Types of Leadership Styles (And Which Is Best for You)

5 Types of Leadership Styles (And Which Is Best for You)

It takes great leadership skills to build great teams.

The best leaders have distinctive leadership styles and are not afraid to make the difficult decisions. They course-correct when mistakes happen, manage the egos of team members and set performance standards that are constantly being met and improved upon.

With a population of more than 327 million, there are literally scores of leadership styles in the world today. In this article, I will talk about the most common types of leadership and how you can determine which works best for you.

5 Types of Leadership Styles

I will focus on 5 common styles that I’ve encountered in my career: democratic, autocratic, transformational, transactional and laissez-faire leadership.

The Democratic Style

The democratic style seeks collaboration and consensus. Team members are a part of decision-making processes and communication flows up, down and across the organizational chart.

The democratic style is collaborative. Author and motivational speaker Simon Sinek is an example of a leader who appears to have a democratic leadership style.

    The Autocratic Style

    The autocratic style, on the other hand, centers the preferences, comfort and direction of the organization’s leader. In many instances, the leader makes decisions without soliciting agreement or input from their team.

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    The autocratic style is not appropriate in all situations at all times, but it can be especially useful in certain careers, such as military service, and in certain instances, such as times of crisis. Steve Jobs was said to have had an autocratic leadership style.

    While the democratic style seeks consensus, the autocratic style is less interested in consensus and more interested in adherence to orders. The latter advises what needs to be done and expects close adherence to orders.

      The Transformational Style

      Transformational leaders drive change. They are either brought into organizations to turn things around, restore profitability or improve the culture.

      Alternatively, transformational leaders may have a vision for what customers, stakeholders or constituents may need in the future and work to achieve those goals. They are change agents who are focused on the future.

      Examples of transformational leader are Oprah and Robert C. Smith, the billionaire hedge fund manager who has offered to pay off the student loan debt of the entire 2019 graduating class of Morehouse College.

        The Transactional Style

        Transactional leaders further the immediate agenda. They are concerned about accomplishing a task and doing what they’ve said they’d do. They are less interested in changing the status quo and more focused on ensuring that people do the specific task they have been hired to do.

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        The transactional leadership style is centered on short-term planning. This style can stifle creativity and keep employees stuck in their present roles.

        The Laissez-Faire Style

        The fifth common leadership style is laissez-faire, where team members are invited to help lead the organization.

        In companies with a laissez-faire leadership style, the management structure tends to be flat, meaning it lacks hierarchy. With laissez-faire leadership, team members might wonder who the final decision maker is or can complain about a lack of leadership, which can translate to lack of direction.

        Which Leadership Style do You Practice?

        You can learn a lot about your leadership style by observing your family of origin and your formative working experiences.

        Whether you realize it, from the time you were born up until the time you went to school, you were receiving information on how to lead yourself and others. From the way your parents and siblings interacted with one another, to unspoken and spoken communication norms, you were a sponge for learning what constitutes leadership.

        The same is true of our formative work experiences. When I started my communications career, I worked for a faith-based organization and then a labor union. The style of communication varied from one organization to the other. The leadership required to be successful in each organization was also miles apart. At Lutheran social services, we used language such as “supporting people in need.” At the labor union, we used language such as “supporting the leadership of workers” as they fought for what they needed.

        Many in the media were more than happy to accept my pitch calls when I worked for the faith-based organization, but the same was not true when I worked for a labor union. The quest for media attention that was fair and balanced became more difficult and my approach and style changed from being light-hearted to being more direct with the labor union.

        I didn’t realize the impact those experiences had on how I thought about my leadership until much later in my career.

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        In my early experience, it was not uncommon for team members to have direct, brash and tough conversations with one another as a matter of course. It was the norm, not the exception. I learned to challenge people, boldly state my desires and preferences, and give tough feedback, but I didn’t account for the actions of others fit for me, as a black woman. I didn’t account for gender biases and racial biases.

        What worked well for my white male bosses, did not work well for me as an African American woman. People experienced my directness as being rude and insensitive. While I needed to be more forceful in advancing the organization’s agenda when I worked for labor, that style did not bode well for faith-based social justice organizations who wanted to use the love of Christ to challenge injustice.

        Whereas I received feedback that I needed to develop more gravitas in the workplace when I worked for labor, when I worked for other organizations after the labor union, I was often told to dial it back. This taught me two important lessons about leadership:

        1. Context Matters

        Your leadership style must adjust to each workplace you are employed. The challenges and norms of an organization will shape your leadership style significantly.

        2. Not All Leadership Styles Are Appropriate for the Teams You’re Leading

        When I worked on political campaigns, we worked nonstop. We started at dawn and worked late into the evening. I couldn’t expect that level of round-the-clock work for people at the average nonprofit. Not only couldn’t I expect it, it was actually unhealthy. My habit of consistently waking up at 4 am to work was profoundly unhealthy for me and harmful for the teams I was leading.

        As life coach and spiritual healer Iyanla Vanzant has said,

        “We learn a lot from what is seen, sensed and shared.”

        The message I was sending to my team was ‘I will value you if you work the way that I work, and if you respond to my 4 am, 5 am and 6 am emails.’ I was essentially telling my employees that I expect you to follow my process and practice.

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        As I advanced in my career and began managing more people, I questioned everything I thought I knew about leadership. It was tough. What worked for me in one professional setting did not work in other settings. What worked at one phase of my life didn’t necessarily serve me at later stages.

        When I began managing millennials, I learned that while committed to the work, they had active interests and passions outside of the office. They were not willing to abandon their lives and happiness for the work, regardless of how fulfilling it might have been.

        The Way Forward

        To be an effective leader, you must know yourself incredibly well. You must be self-reflective and also receptive to feedback.

        As fellow Lifehack contributor Mike Bundrant wrote in the article 10 Essential Leadership Qualities That Make a Great Leader:

        “Those who lead must understand human nature, and they start by fully understanding themselves…They know their strengths, and are equally aware of their weaknesses and thus understand the need for team work and the sharing of responsibility.”

        The way to determine your leadership style is to get to know yourself and to be mindful of the feedback you receive from others. Think about the leadership lessons that were seen, sensed and shared in your family of origin. Then think about what feels right for you. Where do you gravitate and what do you tend to avoid in the context of leadership styles?

        If you are really stuck, think about using a personality assessment to shed light on your work patterns and preferences.

        Finally, the path for determining your leadership style is to think about not only what you need, or what your company values, but also what your team needs. They will give you cues on what works for them and you need to respond accordingly.

        Leadership requires flexibility and attentiveness. Contrary to unrealistic notions of leadership, being a leader is less about being served and more about being of service.

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        Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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