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How To Avoid These 7 Deadly Entrepreneurial Sins

How To Avoid These 7 Deadly Entrepreneurial Sins

The life of an entrepreneur is full of excitement, action, and fun. It has a fast pace and it always changes. It also entails making a lot of choices, leading either to success and euphoria or failure and depression. Debauchery may appear in the life of anyone involved in entrepreneurship, either genuinely or by role.

Below, you will find the traps that most commonly avert leaders from reaching their goals. I’ve also included advice on how you can shield yourself against these attractions.

1. Lust

There is too much appeal in the sirens of success. The dream of money, glory, sports cars, and luxurious mansions can deplete you of energy, focus, and resources that are crucial in the business-building process. When entrepreneurs fall in the trap of lust, they overindulge in acquiring status symbols, depriving their still-vulnerable business of much-needed money and time, thereby compromising the whole operation.

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Avoid sinning by restraining yourself from personal rewards until your business reaches a predetermined milestone. Maintain the goal of creating an enduring profitable business in your sights, with capital reserves that surpass the fixed overhead of one year. After that, there will be lots of cash available for personal rewards, as well as enough relaxation time to go with it.

2. Gluttony

Although there is nothing wrong with having an appetite for a growing business, to be successful, companies should develop and follow a moderated and controlled pattern. Entrepreneurs that fall victim to gluttony will bite off more than they can chew, prematurely undermining their own performance and, ultimately, their reputation.

Avoid sinning by pursuing sensible growth targets. Avoid going for sales that cannot be supported by your infrastructure. To achieve long-lasting growth, conquer the domains of reputation and service first.

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3. Greed

Maximizing your revenues is of great importance, but be careful not to compromise neither your company and reputation nor the industry. Greedy entrepreneurs will let immorality guide their decisions just to achieve profits by manipulating their marketing, prices, and staff accordingly. In the long run, they will only damage their own reputation and business longevity.

Avoid sinning by planning well ahead. Become known in the market for doing justice to your personnel, your clients, and the industry (not excluding the competition), and you’ll find in them valuable allies towards development and profitability instead of sworn enemies that are always looking to take you out.

4. Sloth

People with a successful history in entrepreneurship are well aware that hard work is not optional and true, long-lasting success doesn’t come overnight. Sloth-seduced entrepreneurs will make clumsy choices, including unproven marketing strategies and business models, unnecessarily upping the risk for everyone involved as well as wasting precious resources.

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Avoid sinning by thoroughly preparing beforehand, managing eagerness, and non-stop testing consistently before putting other people’s money and names on the line. Never forget that it takes more than just your passion to transform any idea into a good one.

5. Wrath

No true entrepreneur is passionless, but being overly passionate almost always leads to unreasonable choices and absurd behavior. When wrath takes hold, entrepreneurs will be driven by unbound emotion, resulting in anger, fear, and devastation, both on the inside and the outside.

Avoid sinning by keeping a results-oriented focus. Be self-aware and gauge your inner fire to the desired level, remaining a gracious leader.

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6. Envy

Measuring yourself against competition is generally a good thing. But there is no need to become overly sensitive whenever your competitors strike a win, otherwise your progress will start lagging behind. Envious entrepreneurs will get caught in a vicious cycle of fighting and setting obstacles to their competitors, thereby deterring their own chances of growing and improving their performance.

Avoid sinning by focusing on your track record. Sometimes you will win, sometimes you will lose by someone performing better than you. Entrepreneurship, however, is not a sprint but a marathon. In the end, the winner will be the one who invests all of his or her energy towards their own performance, avoiding any distractions.

7. Pride

Feeding your ego, when done in moderation, may help during the business-building process. However, being overly proud will hide the truth from your eyes. Entrepreneurs blinded by pride will stand by their ideas no matter what, turning down any outside input just to maintain their ego.

Avoid sinning by maintaining an open learning culture. Concentrate on success rather than self-righteousness. Success tends to be enjoyed more when many people have worked to achieve it.

Featured photo credit: Nanagyei via imcreator.com

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Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

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1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

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3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

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5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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