Advertising
Advertising

5 Deadly Coupon Codes Mistakes to Avoid at All Costs

5 Deadly Coupon Codes Mistakes to Avoid at All Costs

Coupon codes can be a great tool for your business. They bring in new customers and get those customers – as well as returning customers – to spend more with your company. However, if used incorrectly, coupon codes can be ineffective, or worse, can be detrimental to your business. If grossly misused, they can even cost your company some serious money.

That’s why it’s important to consider both the benefits of coupon codes and their proper application as well. Here are some mistakes you should avoid when creating coupon codes.

Advertising

1. Not Understanding Customer Acquisition Cost

The concept of customer acquisition cost is a fundamental one, and it’s the principle that drives your coupon campaigns. The customer acquisition cost is the amount of money you need to spend in order to gain a customer.

You want to spend some time thinking about what CAC is right for your business; after all, one that is too high might harm your company’s finances, just as you would by overpaying on advertisements. The point here is not to spend a long time crunching numbers, but it is worth taking note of what you stand to gain – and lose – by offering coupons.

Advertising

2. Offering Too Steep of a Discount

While a calculated large discount such as 30% off can work out very well for your company, bad things can happen if you don’t take the time to figure out where to apply this discount and how many discounts you give out. For one, a high discount rate might mean a higher CAC.

But on the other hand, a large discount can also work too well by bringing in a lot of people who wouldn’t otherwise shop with your business (and won’t plan to again) just to buy the steeply discounted product. Furthermore, if your company fulfills its own orders, you could be putting unnecessary strain on shipping and logistics, as well as your sales team.

Advertising

3. Offering Unlimited Discounts

If you offer store-wide discounts, such as nordstrom coupon codes make sure that they’re limited number of uses. Shoppers could easily take advantage of your discount and buy much more at discount than you had anticipated, leading to a lot of sales but low revenue.

Furthermore, if you give out too many discount codes, you run the risk of running out of inventory. If your coupon campaign was designed to push out older stock, you may end up having to order more of this old, unwanted stock, which could cost you more money than originally anticipated.

Advertising

4. Not Giving Away a Good Enough Discount

Most of the mistakes you can make err on the side of giving away too much. But, don’t forget that you can also be guilty of not giving away enough. Sure, not much is lost if your coupon deal isn’t the greatest on the market. You can always provide customers with a better discount.

However, by knowing the sweet spot, you can save yourself some time experimenting with different discounts. There will need to be some give-and-take as you find the happy medium between what’s good for you and good for your customers, and it will take some time and a few attempts, but the closer you get the first time, the happier everyone will be.

5. Discounting Money Cards

This mistake is easy to make and could prove to be fatal to your business. If you choose to offer a discount, be sure not to allow that discount to be used on products tied to real money, such as gift cards. If you allow a 10-percent discount on all your products and one of those products happens to be a $50 gift card, guess who’s taking advantage and buying themselves free money? Everyone. Keep it safe and allow your discounts to be applied only to certain products.

Featured photo credit: CouponMate via lifehack.org

More by this author

6 Reasons Why French Press Makes the Best Coffee 9 Things To Remember If You Love Someone Who Doesn’t Easily Show Affection 12 Ways To Earn More Money While You Have A Full-Time Job 7 Steps to Reduce Your Laptop’s Fan Noise & Increase Speed 7 Ideas To Decorate Your Home Using LED Strip Lights

Trending in Budget Activity

1 6 Easy Ways to Treat Yourself 2 7 Websites to Sell Used Stuff Profitably 3 Seven Tips to Save Money While Renovating Your Home 4 4 Ways to Make Every Penny Stretch in 2017 5 Getting Out of Debt in 4 Simple Steps

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

Advertising

Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

Advertising

I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

Advertising

Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

Advertising

So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

Read Next