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5 Tips to Help Brands Win Millennial Parents Over

5 Tips to Help Brands Win Millennial Parents Over

There has been a lot of focus on how to target and market to Millennials, especially since their purchasing power has grown to an estimated $200 billion annually. However, there has not been much talk about directing efforts specifically to Millennial parents, which is strange since Millennial moms, for example, represent 46% of women in their age group. How can brands win Millennial parents over with their marketing efforts? Follow these tips:

Show blended families.

The make-up of the Millennial family is quite different from prior generations. A growing number of marriages are interracial, and a lot of Millennial moms are single parents. When marketing to this group, advertisers must take this new kind of family into account. Advertisements should no longer show only the typical mom, dad and two kids living in suburbia in commercials, and should instead try to appeal to Millennial parents by showing more diverse families.

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Adopt healthy practices.

Six out of 10 Millennials claim to have healthier eating habits than their parents, and this behavior becomes even more pronounced once Millennials become parents. Millennial parents are interested in purchasing foods loaded with fruits and vegetables, vitamins and nutrients. In fact, price is not an issue when it comes to healthy eating for Millennials. Although higher income Millennial parents can easily afford to shop at natural or organic food stores, lower income parents cannot. Instead, this group of Millennial parents practices healthy eating by researching healthy recipes and buying fresh ingredients from regular grocery stores. Food distributors should take this into account when merchandising to attract Millennial parents and pair items that can be used in recipes together.

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Connect to them.

Although Millennials have traditionally been considered as adventurous eaters, this changes slightly when this generation becomes parents. When Millennials have kids, they are more likely than Millennial non-parents to buy comfort foods that somehow tie into their heritage and less likely to buy exotic foods that they don’t relate to. For example, Southern Millennials would be more likely to buy barbeque foods than non-parent Millennials, but less likely to purchase Mexican or Chinese foods. These parents are also drawn to foods that remind them of their childhood, which was the basis for the “Bring Back the Awesome” campaign by Fruit Loops.

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Be social.

It’s no surprise that Millennial parents are strongly influenced by social media, especially when it comes to beauty, fitness and fashion. Millennial parents spend, on average, four more hours per week on social media than non-Millennial parents, giving brands one more reason why they should direct advertising dollars to these platforms. Research shows that corporate Millennial moms are more likely to research beauty products than stay-at-home moms, probably because they have to use them on a daily basis. However, the group that spends the most time researching these categories is Hispanic Millennial moms. Because there is a huge opportunity to target Hispanic Millennial moms who are obviously looking for more information online, beauty supply distributors and brands should work together to coordinate in-store and online efforts directed at Hispanic moms. Brands should create how-to videos and actively show these moms ways to do their hair and makeup using Pinterest, Instagram and other platforms. These platforms should then direct buyers to stores where they can purchase the different products used.

Be charitable.

One trait that does not go away when Millennials become parents is the desire to give back. Millennial parents are attracted to brands that have charitable backgrounds, and a few brands have had major success using this tactic. For example, Target was able to tie in their charitable efforts with a major life event–kids going back to school. When parents purchased back-to-school supplies at Target, the company matched the purchase with a donation to the Kids in Need foundation. Brands should attempt to create charitable campaigns around major life events that Millennial parents care about, whether it’s having a baby or starting kindergarten. This will help Millennial parents connect to the campaign and drive them to participate.

How do you think brands should market towards Millennial parents? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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Joel Goldstein

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Last Updated on October 28, 2020

The Crucial Letter Your SMART Goal Is Missing

The Crucial Letter Your SMART Goal Is Missing

SMART goals are a simple, logical way to organize your goals as you set them throughout life. Not only does this technique help you identify reachable goals, but it helps break down goals into smaller and more manageable pieces.

However, there is one crucial element (or letter) that is missing from this acronym. This missing letter can potentially make it harder for you to reach your goal – no matter how well you have broken down your goal into different pieces and action steps. However, once you understand this missing piece, you’ll be able to use it to move forward with your goals.

What Are Smart Goals?

If you are not familiar with the SMART goal setting technique and what the acronym means, here is a brief rundown with a simple example:

  • S = Specific — Your goal has to be specific enough (“I want to lose 4 inches off my waist”).
  • M = Measurable — You can measure your waistline every week to keep track of your progress.
  • A = Achievable — Do you think that you can do this? Or are you going too far by getting rid of yet another 4 inches? Or should you expand the goal to 5 inches; is that within reach?
  • R = Realistic — Is your lifestyle stable enough that you can commit to this goal?  Are you mentally prepared to do this? Do you have the resources you need for this goal?
  • T = Time-framed — You could want to achieve this goal within a week or within six months, but it should have a specific time frame.

As you can see, when you break down your goals like this, they become much more manageable and concrete than just saying “I want to to be slimmer.”

All fine and well, except that there is a crucial letter missing in this package – another letter “A.”

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The Missing Letter

The other letter “A” stands for accountability, and this is a great way to make sure that your defined plan is actually executed and is not left just on the talking or planning level. Even if you have crafted a masterful plan by using the SMART goal technique, it becomes useless if you don’t actually execute it. To make sure you start the execution phase, you want to throw some accountability into the mix.

By having some external pressure on your back (in the form of accountability), you are more likely to take action on your goal steps than if you just keep the plan to yourself. Accountability is based on the fact that you want to stand behind your words and save face. When you announce your goal to the world, you realize that the world is now watching you, and you don’t want to let the world down.

Accountability is also about facing the expectations of others. If you announce a goal or a task in public, other people are expecting you will achieve the tasks and goals you have laid out for yourself.

Watch this video and find out how by having dependable accountability, you can reach your goal more efficiently:

Ways to Implement the Letter “A” in Your Goal

There are plenty of ways you can go about creating accountability. Choose which one will work to motivate you the most.

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1. Keep It to Yourself

I was a bit hesitant to include this, since in this scenario you are not telling others about your plans or tasks. However, for some people this might work since your conscience is your accountability partner in this situation. And you don’t want to let your conscience down.

2. Announce It to Other People

Your people could be your colleagues at work, your local golf club buddies, the subscribers and readers of your blog, or your Twitter followers. I would say that accountability is more effective when dealing with “offline people.” Being accountable face-to-face to someone is very effective.

I’m in no way underestimating the power of “online people” either. If you are trying to form solid relationships with others online, you want to keep your word – even if you don’t necessarily meet the people in the same sense as in the offline world.

3. Find an Accountability Partner

A more intimate way of being accountable is to find an accountability partner. This could be a friend or spouse, but it needs to be someone you feel comfortable reporting to. When this route is chosen, you might decide to call your partner on a frequent basis to tell them how well you are progressing on the goal.

4. Get on Stickk.com

If none of the above ways work for you, it’s time to put Stickk into play.

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Stickk.com is a website where you can announce your goal (“Commitment Contract”), and to make you even more committed to reaching that goal, there is money at stake. Money is not mandatory to get set up with Stickk, but knowing that you will lose a certain amount of money if you don’t reach your goal can give you an extra push to get stuff done.

5. Join Mastermind Groups

A mastermind group is a group of like-minded people gathering on a frequent basis (online or offline), trying to push each other closer to their goals. This type of accountability is very common in the business world. When you are in a mastermind group and you have set the objectives you want to achieve by the next meeting, you want to get stuff done and fulfill other’s expectations.

Mastermind groups are a great way to improve your productivity and reach your goals with the help of others.

6. Hire a Coach

If you really want to get personal attention for your goals, then hiring a personal coach may be the best way to stay accountable.

Not only are you accountable to your coach, but you also have to pay for his/her attention. This makes the coach option even more effective. You want to make sure you do everything you can to get the assignments done before the deadline you two have set. So, there is a money factor to keep you accountable as well. Since you want to quickly move forward, this option is a very effective for staying accountable with your SMART goals.

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The Bottom Line

Next time, set your goal using “SMARTA,” instead. Add that letter “A” to the SMART goal setting technique:

Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time-framed, Accountable.

The accountability factor of reaching your goals may be just the thing you need to make them a reality.

More Tips on SMART Goals

Featured photo credit: Estée Janssens via unsplash.com

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