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How To Train For Your First 5k

How To Train For Your First 5k

Race season is here and maybe you’re contemplating signing up for your first 5k. You may be wondering how do I train for my first 5k? and how do I prepare for race day?

Regardless of whether you’re new to running or if you have run in the past, running your first 5k can be nerve-racking. I’m here to tell you don’t be nervous — be excited! You have a wonderful journey ahead of you!

First things first, get crystal clear on two things:

1. Why do you want to run a 5k?

What is the reason you want to run a 5k? Is it to raise money for a charitable organization, to check it off of your bucket list, or to join a friend who has already signed up? Know the specific reason you want to run your first 5k.

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2. How will running a 5k make you feel?

This is important, and the reason why is because when you are faced with obstacles, you can you use this tool to fall back on. Will you feel accomplished after your first 5k? Will you be inspired to sign up for another race? How will running a 5k make you feel?

I started running for one reason: my step-father lost his life to cancer. I decided to find a 5k race that would provide financial resources to families affected by cancer in my area. That was my reason. I wanted to feel accomplished and to support a cause that mattered dearly to me. Little did I know after my first 5k that I’d find a new love for running. Fast forward to two years later, I am now training for my first marathon. Running inspired me to reach my full athletic potential — or, at least, to go after it!

Now onto the work. Training for a race can seem like an overwhelming thing to do, but keep in mind that thousands of people each and every year, of all shapes and sizes, run 5k races and have fun while doing so!

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Training Tips:

1. Start 2 months before your race

Pick a race that allows for 60 days of training. Running a 5k may be an easy feat for some, and for others, it may be frightening. No matter where you are with respect to physical capabilities, 60 days will allow for adequate training for race day. Remember, Rome wasn’t built in a day.

2. Start small

That’s right! One foot in front of the other. During the first portions of your training, you may be incorporating a run/walk routine and building off that — that’s okay! I remember when I first started training for my first 5k, I would run a block then walk a block. When I became comfortable with the running portion, I slowly increased the distance I was running and decreased the distance I was walking.

Tip: Create a training schedule like this one. Sticking to a schedule will you help you stay on track without overwhelming your body.

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3. Enlist the support of friends

Perhaps you have a friend who can run with you or maybe simply cheer for you at the start and finish line. Either way, having support from people in your life will keep you motivated to stick to your training plan and to do your best on race day.

Tip: When you’re faced with an obstacle, refer to your answers for why you want to run a 5k and how you will feel after you finish your first 5k.

Race Day Tips:

1. What to wear

Since you have been training for your race, you will be knowledgeable of possible weather conditions on race day. The biggest thing to remember is to be comfortable when you run. Find attire that provides comfort while allowing for physical activity. Don’t focus on what you will look like or having the newest running attire — if you’re comfortable, you can focus on the race ahead of you.

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2. Hydration/Nutrition

Be sure to adequately hydrate your body before and on race day. Drink plenty of water the day and evening before the race and immediately when you wake up on race day. With respect to nutrition, let’s simplify this a bit: a 5k is 3.1 miles. It isn’t a marathon, but it isn’t an easy feat. Fuel your body the day before with nutrient-rich foods high in fat, protein, and calories. For race day, depending on the time of your race, be sure to eat and fuel your body, but don’t overdo it.

3. Handling the crowd at the start line

This is often where the nerves start kicking in, but let these nerves motivate you. Your best bet is to know your average pace and position yourself in the crowd accordingly. Sometimes, with larger crowds’, runners are lined up based on their pace. Find your pace group and start and finish with them. If this isn’t an option, position yourself with the crowd accordingly. For example, fast runners up front, average pace in the middle, and slower runners in the back. From experience, I will admit I position myself with runners that are 30 seconds ahead of my pace. This way, I keep my pace up and am always looking to push myself to the next level throughout the course.

Conclusion

Running your first 5k can be a scary and exciting thing all at the same time. Training for your first 5k can seem like a daunting task, but it’s something thousands of people take on every year, and so can you! Be sure to train properly, research 5k running plans, enlist friends for support, and always remember: this isn’t the Olympics, have some fun!

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Tara Massan

Founder of Be Moved, Life Coach and Writer.

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Last Updated on November 11, 2018

How to Gain Muscle Fast (The Healthy And Natural Way)

How to Gain Muscle Fast (The Healthy And Natural Way)

There’s a common misconception that building muscle occurs entirely in the gym from exercise and lifting weights. In this article, we are going to debunk this notion that weight lifting and gym exercise yields 100%, or even 90% for that matter, of muscle building results.

So how to gain muscle fast in a healthy way?

Yes working-out is a critical aspect of developing muscle, however it should not be the focal point. Building muscle occurs primarily outside of the gym by way of diet/eating habits, and sleep regimen.

How Is Muscle Developed?

Muscle is developed from damaging the tissue during exercise, and facilitating the most optimal circumstances for repair and growth of those same tissues. This means you will not only need to exercise, but you should focus on carbohydrates around your exercises, and adequate rest and recovery between workouts.

If your focus is building muscle and not losing weight, focusing on a high-carb diet with carb loading around the workout days will yield great results. Yes, you absolutely can lose fat and build muscle following a low-carb diet, but you’ll make faster progress if you follow a high-carb diet instead. Now don’t take that as a green-light to stuff your face with pasta, bread, and all sorts of other carb-heavy foods.

Let’s examine Glycogen – a multibranched polysaccharide of glucose that serves as a form of energy storage in humans. Muscle glycogen is a form of carbohydrate that’s stored in your muscles and liver. Glycogen is the primary source of fuel during exercise, and low glycogen levels decreases your ability to gain strength and muscle. The best way to maintain high levels of muscle glycogen is to eat a high-carb diet, with around 1 to 3 grams of carbs per pound of body weight.

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The time of ingestion of a carbohydrate supplement on muscle glycogen storage post exercise was examined in a study with twelve male cyclists that exercised continuously for 70 min on a cycle ergometer at 68% VO2max, interrupted by six 2-min intervals at 88% VO2max, on two separate occasions. The results suggest that delaying the ingestion of a carbohydrate supplement post-exercise will result in a reduced rate of muscle glycogen storage.

How to Gain Muscle Fast?

If you want to gain muscle as quickly, safely and efficiently as possible, then you want high muscle glycogen levels. Here’s a few effective approaches to building muscle:

Muscle Growth and Glycogen Levels

The primary driver of gaining muscle and its growth is progressive tension overload, which involves exposing your muscles to increasingly greater levels of tension over time. The most effective way to achieve this is to get as strong as possible on heavy compound lifts (squat, bench press, deadlift, over head press, bent over barbell rows..etc).

When you keep glycogen levels high, you’re going to gain strength faster, which means gaining muscle faster, too. Having higher levels of muscle glycogen will more than likely help you build muscle faster.

Maintaining high muscle glycogen levels also improves post-workout genetic signaling relating to muscle growth and repair.

Muscle Recovery and Glycogen Levels

Not only do higher muscle glycogen levels yield quicker strength gains, it will also improve recovery between workouts.

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On the contrary, low muscle glycogen levels are associated with overtraining, and even increasingly popular low-carb diets, which deplete muscle glycogen. Low glycogen levels also increase cortisol and reduce testosterone levels in athletes, which is a key component needed for building muscle.

Those on a low-carb diets also have reduced insulin levels. Insulin, in addition to helping store nutrients, also has powerful anti-catabolic properties. Basically insulin decreases the rate at which muscle proteins are broken down, which in turn creates a more anabolic environment conducive to muscle growth and development.

Intermittent Fasting (“IF”) and Testosterone

Fasting is not just a beneficial way to manage your weight, caloric intake, and start shredding as I have indicated in previous articles. Some research shows that fasting can be a source of strength enhancement and increases in testosterone stimulation.

As humans age metabolism slows and testosterone production decreases, this simply means that the body will no longer be able to work as efficiently as it did in earlier years. This is one of the primary reasons why you should take more care to your diet.

Research has shown that intermittent fasting can enhance the ability to secrete growth hormone in the body.[1] This is one of the primary reasons why IF is one of the preferred dietary habits of bodybuilders and strength athletes such as myself, whom will utilize an approach that emphasizes fasting phases (2 of 7 days of the week for example).

Research has also shown that IF can increase the bodies ability to signal luteinizing hormone.[2] In non-obese men, an intermittent fasting testosterone study showed that IF increased LH (luteinizing hormone – a testosterone precursor hormone) up to 67% and overall testosterone 180%.

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Luteinizing hormone is one that works in both men and women to enhance our ability to be sexually active and productive. In women, luteinizing hormone can trigger ovulation, and in men, works to stimulate testosterone.

Intermittent fasting also increases levels of a hormone called adiponectin. This increase in adiponectin during the fast helps improve insulin sensitivity. Adiponectin is so effective, in fact, that it’s been shown to reverse insulin resistance in mice.

Gaining Muscle and Macro Nutrients – Protein!

Something that absolutely cannot go overlooked is the protein consumption. Personally, I believe protein should be primarily consumed in food, however if looking to gain muscle, it can often be quite difficult to hit daily macro nutrient requirements.

If one is to build muscle consistently a general rule of thumb is to aim for 1-1.5grams of protein per pound of body weight on a daily basis. So as a 200lb man I would be needing to consume 200grams – 250grams of protein per day. I would aim for the higher consumption on days when very active and training.

As I’m sure you’re aware, it can often be quite difficult to consume that much protein, especially in food! It’s in these cases where supplementing protein isn’t a bad idea and I have discussed in great detail the different types of protein in previous articles.

Generally speaking, I lean towards Whey Protein Isolate, or non-dairy options such as Hemp Protein, or Pea Protein. As of late I have been waking up every morning and consuming one scoop of Hydrolyzed Collagen Protein Bovines from grass-fed beef. Collagen peptides are highly bioavailable and act as building blocks; renewing bodily tissues such as skin, bones and joints.[3]

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Collagen peptides may act as a messenger to the cells and trigger the synthesis and reorganization of new collagen fibers, thereby supporting tissue structure. Consuming protein such as Collagen in the morning is beneficial as the stomachs acids are needed to optimally break-down and absorb protein.

Though this has been a topic of great debate, I also firmly believe adequate carbohydrates are required to build muscle, especially if you are exercising/training often. With all the low-carb movements floating around the internet, there’s lots of misinformation. Muscle-building requires energy which is typically through an increased intake of carbohydrates.

Yes to gain mass, you have to ensure you’re consuming enough protein to rebuild muscle tissue damaged from training; but also consider carbohydrates because gaining size requires filling your muscles with glycogen as we discussed earlier in this article.

Conclusion

If you’re serious about gaining muscle fast the healthy way, it requires commitment and consistency. You will need to exercise and I highly suggest you download MyFitnessPal to track progress, set goals, and maintain diet.

It’s also motivational because you can find like-minded people in the fitness community, or encourage your friends to download the app as well and follow each other. I personally did this when I was losing weight and gaining muscle, and it was a blast to see my own progress and that of people I care about.

As always I’m not just here to write about the steps you need to take, I’m also here to help! You can message me anytime or email me with any questions you may have. I’m more than happy to assist with your muscle building and weight loss goals!

Featured photo credit: Arthur Edelman via how to gain muscle fast

Reference

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