Advertising

Steps to Take If Your Child is a Victim of Cyberbullying

Advertising
Steps to Take If Your Child is a Victim of Cyberbullying

Technology is a wonderful thing. The advent of the Internet, smartphones, and social media has made it possible for people to communicate with each other from almost every corner of the globe.

Unfortunately, there are those who choose to use this incredible ability for nefarious means, such as harassing and infringing on the rights of others. As a parent, you need to be aware of the fact that your child will likely face instances of cyberbullying at some point or another in their lives, and you need to know how to deal with it if the situation arises. If you know how to handle cyberbullies and other online harassment, you’ll feel much more at ease whenever your child connects to the web.

Teach Them Not To Respond

Just like real-world bullies, cyberbullies thrive on getting their victims to play back at them. Make sure your children know to never respond to an individual sending threatening or otherwise harmful messages to them electronically.

First of all, your children should know to never stoop to the bully’s level. If they do, they run the risk of saying something threatening themselves, and being just as guilty of cyberbullying as the person bothering them. Instill in your children the idea that they are better than that, and that the strongest action they can take is to simply ignore someone’s attempts at bullying them.

Advertising

Secondly, by ignoring the cyberbully, your child takes all the power away from the hurtful individual. If your kid is not willing to engage with the person on the other end of the exchange, then nothing the bully says will affect them.

Save Messages

However, they absolutely should save every word their bully sends them. Usually, there will be no shortage of evidence here, as the bully will continue sending messages – even if your child doesn’t say anything back – with the hopes that something they say will trigger a response.

Though copying and pasting these messages is efficient, it also may not “hold up” as evidence if the incident goes far enough to warrant legal action. The best course of action is to take screenshots of the actual messages, whether on the phone or computer, creating a true replication of the messages in question.

You should also document the time, date, and device on which the messages were received. Once again, if the harassment continues, you want to have as much evidence as possible in order for the authorities to be able to act on your complaint.

Advertising

Assess Threat

As an adult, you’re likely to take any threat to your child’s safety seriously. But you should also be able to assess the threats being made, and decide whether the person on the other end is truly putting your child in danger or not.

This isn’t to say that any amount of cyberbullying is OK. But there is a difference between one-off instances in which a classmate of your child called them a name, and ongoing harassment and threats of violence. Depending on the circumstances, you should know how to react and who to inform.

Identify the Perpetrator

There are numerous ways to figure out who the person on the other end of the line is, even if they try to mask their true identity.

If the cyberbully has been texting or calling your child, you can use reverse phone lookup services to at least discover where the phone in question is being used, as well as what service provider the user has.

Advertising

You can also use Google to search for screen names and determine if the person on the other end is actually pretending to be someone else.

Still, you may not be able to figure out who the perpetrator is, in which case you should definitely report the suspicious behavior.

Report Abuse

Depending on the severity of the incident(s), there are a number of channels you can go through.

The first step is simply to report the abuse to the service the bully is utilizing, be it Facebook, Snapchat, Kik, or Gmail. These service providers take cyberbullying seriously, as they want their users to have as enjoyable an experience as possible when using them.

Advertising

If you know who the child is, you might begin by informing their parents of the misdeeds. In less severe cases, this may be all that is necessary to combat instances of cyberbullying.

If the child attends the same school or district as your child, you may want to involve teachers and administration in order to curb possible instances of physical bullying that may occur on school grounds. Furthermore, school faculty are trained professionals, as well as mandated reporters. If they are witnesses to true bullying and abuse, they are required by law to report it to police.

If it comes to it, you might have to report the abuse to police on your own. By doing so, you allow them to complete a thorough investigation into the matter. At the very least, they will contact the perpetrator and warn them to cease their deeds. If the bullying continues, the police will be forced to take further action,

Assess Privacy

To prevent any of this from happening in the first place, or to prevent it from happening again, go through your children’s online accounts and ensure that their privacy settings are as restrictive as possible. Set their accounts so that those not approved or “friended” can’t view their profile or send them messages.

Advertising

If it comes to it, you may want to delete your child’s social media accounts altogether. Though they may not be happy with the decision, they need to know their safety comes first, no matter what.

Featured photo credit: Flickr / Build Me Up – Photo Project [38/365] / love.lee☼ via farm7.staticflickr.com

More by this author

Matt Duczeminski

A passionate writer who shares lifestlye tips on Lifehack

8 Steps to Ensure You Accomplish Your Goals 6 Steps to Ensure You Keep Reaching For Your Goals 5 Ways to Lessen Back Pain 12 Self-Destructive Habits to Eliminate for a Positive Life 7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

Trending in Parenting

1 How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades 2 50 Single Mom Quotes On Staying Strong And Loving 3 10 Things To Remember When You Feel Like a Failure as a Parent 4 Why Spending Time With Your Family Is Important (And How To Do So) 5 How to Talk to Teens And Have Real Conversations

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Advertising
How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

Advertising

You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

Advertising

3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

Advertising

6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

Read Next