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Time Well Spent Abroad: How Nomads Enrich Their Travels

Time Well Spent Abroad: How Nomads Enrich Their Travels

“Things you own, end up owning you.”

Who can forget this epic Fight Club quote for keeping possessions to a minimum? According to CurrencyFair, increasingly more people are drawn to this “rise of the digital nomad”. If you are a nomad yourself or plan on becoming one, check out these ways to enrich your travels and make the best out of life and time.

Why Do People Become Nomads?

There are three reasons why people become nomads:

1. Boredom, Desire to Change

Some just get fed up with their current lifestyle and need a makeover. Independent of reason, many nomads believe giving up on possessions and packing your life in a backpack is the answer they seek. “Less is more” suddenly has a new meaning. So ask yourself: Am I happy with what I currently have? Is this lifestyle that I built for myself aligned with my inner needs? Am I lacking or missing something?

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2. Burning Wish to Make More of Your Time

The watchmakers from Watchismo Xeric, in regards to the importance of this limited resource, have the most beautiful definition of time:

[watch indicating time] “interacts with the natural conditions of our universe, just like our muscles and bones. It ticks with a beating heart, just like us.”

Time is probably the biggest investment we make over the course of a lifetime.

Even Steve Jobs said that time is the most precious resource we have. Many people struggle with feeling like they aren’t making the best of this limited offer. Nomads have a burning desire to get the most out of a day’s worth, and a remote lifestyle is what feeds the hunger.

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3. Freedom and Disconnection

The ability to disconnect is also the ability to live in a free world. Sure, being a digital nomad means ensuring you’re connected in some way to the outside world, but for nomads, time spent away from Wi-Fi and connectivity signals is also important. When you’re exploring the world and not just isolating yourself inside a screen, disconnection is the key.

But how can you be prepared to disconnect and enter a jungle outside your notebook, yet still be connected to the outside world? A compass, a mechanical wrist watch and a good conversation partner who shares the silence (or a pet) are some of the basics you need to ensure you won’t get lost, ever again.

So we’ve nailed down the reason(s) why people become nomads. But life of solitary is scary. So how can you connect to others like you?

How to Connect and Meet People during Your Travels

As a nomad, it’s quite common to “be” the outsider. If you’re traveling alone, you can’t just sulk in work and solo explorations. We are all social beings, and truth to be told, it’s always fun to meet new people or have locals show you around. Here’s how you can connect to more people:

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Make Use of Targeted Nomad Communities

Communities such as Digital Nomad Community, Nomad Forum, Hashtag Nomads, NomadList are the best way to start. These communities cover areas such as accommodation, things to do, co-working spaces, meetups with other travelers and more. Another option is to use services available worldwide (i.e. Uber, BlaBlaCar) which gives you access to locals and people who “know stuff”.

Social Media – Facebook Groups

Another way is just to look for Facebook groups that encourage the trend. Recommendations: Digital Nomad Entrepreneurs Meetup, Expat groups (city-specific), WebWorkTravel, Free Nomads, Location Independent Singles and more.

Make Use of Events Platforms

You can use Meetup or Eventbrite and see what events (free & paid) you can attend. Or directly connect with local co-working spaces – most of them organize networking events for their own communities.

Connecting Through Music and Cultural Events

There are several ways to do it:

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  1. Attend concerts [big or small] and cultural events.
  2. Learn how to play an instrument and do street gigs. Easy songs to jam on your guitar include: Zombie (The Cranberries), Proud Mary (CCR), Knockin’ on Heaven’s Doors (Bob Dylan), Hand in My Pocket (Alanis Morissette), Runaway Train (Soul Asylum), What’s Up (Four non Blondes), Chasing Cars (Snow Patrol), In My Place; Clocks (Coldplay), Otherside (RHCP).

Accommodation and Rental Platforms (Free & Paid)

CouchSurfing or AirBnB are great ways to meet more people. While CS is mostly free (and is more suited for city breaks and leisure time), AirBnB offers the option of renting one room in a shared apartment if you don’t like the idea of renting an entire place all by yourself. There are regular meetups going on in major cities where you can meet locals or other travelers.

Takeaways: How Does All This Impact Our World Today?

To sum it up, the world is changing. People are changing. Opportunities are increasing for a more remote lifestyle. If you’re wondering how the remote lifestyle impacts the world, check out this infographic from SelfStorage.com about the gig economy, with interesting stats and facts.

gig economy nomad

    Featured photo credit: Maher El Aridi via unsplash.com

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    Last Updated on November 15, 2019

    10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult

    10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult

    Bad habits expose us to suffering that is entirely avoidable. Unfortunately, these bad habits are difficult to break because they are 100% dependent on our mental and emotional state.

    Anything we do that can prove harmful to us is a bad habit – drinking, drugs, smoking, procrastination, poor communication are all examples of bad habits. These habits have negative effects on our physical, mental and emotional health.

    Humans are hardwired to respond to stimuli and to expect a consequence of any action. This is how habits are acquired: the brain expects to be rewarded a certain way under certain circumstances. How you initially responded to certain stimuli is how your brain will always remind you to behave when the same stimuli are experienced.

    If you visited the bar close to your office with colleagues every Friday, your brain will learn to send you a signal to stop there even when you are alone and eventually not just on Fridays. It will expect the reward of a drink after work every day, which can potentially lead to a drinking problem.

    Kicking negative behavior patterns and steering clear of them requires a lot of willpower and there are many reasons why breaking bad habits is so difficult.

    1. Lack of Awareness or Acceptance

    Breaking a bad habit is not possible if the person who has it is not aware that it is a bad one.

    Many people will not realize that their communication skills are poor or that their procrastination is affecting them negatively, or even that the drink they had as a nightcap has now increased to three.

    Awareness brings acceptance. Unless a person realizes on their own that a habit is bad, or someone manages to convince them of the same, there is very little chance of the habit being kicked.

    2. No Motivation

    Going through a divorce, not being able to cope with academics and falling into debt are instances that can bring a profound sense of failure with them. A person going through these times can fall into a cycle of negative thinking where the world is against them and nothing they can do will ever help, so they stop trying altogether.

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    This give-up attitude is a bad habit that just keeps coming around. Being in debt could make you feel like you are failing at maintaining your home, family and life in general.

    If you are looking to get out of a rut and feel motivated, take a look at this article: Why Is Internal Motivation So Powerful (And How to Find It)

    3. Underlying Psychological Conditions

    Psychological conditions such as depression and ADD can make it difficult to break bad habits.

    A depressed person may find it difficult to summon the energy to cook a healthy meal, resulting in food being ordered in or consumption of packaged foods. This could lead to eventually become a habit that adversely affects health and is difficult to overcome.

    A person with ADD may start to clean their house but get distracted soon after, leaving the task incomplete, eventually leading to a state where it is acceptable to live in a house that is untidy and dirty.

    The fear of missing out (FOMO) is very real to some people. Obsessively checking their social media and news sources, they may believe that not knowing of something as soon as it is published can be catastrophic to their social standing.

    4. Bad Habits Make Us Feel Good

    One of the reasons it is difficult to break habits is that a lot of them make us feel good.[1]

    We’ve all been there – the craving for a tub of ice cream after a breakup or a casual drag on a joint, never to be repeated until we miss how good it made us feel. We succumb to the craving for the pleasure felt while indulging in it, cementing it as a habit even while we are aware it isn’t good for us.

    Over-eating is a very common bad habit. Just another pack of crisps, a couple of candies, a large soda… none of these are needed by us. We want them because they give us comfort. They’re familiar, they taste good and we don’t even notice when we progress from just one extra slice of pizza to four.

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    You can read this article to learn more: We Do What We Know Is Bad for Us, Why?

    5. Upward Comparisons

    Comparisons are a bad habit that many of us have been exposed to since we were children. Parents might have compared us to siblings, teachers may have compared us to classmates, and bosses could compare us to past and present employees.

    The people who have developed the bad habit of comparing themselves to others have been given incorrect yardsticks for measurement from the start.

    These people will always find it difficult to break out of this bad habit because there will always be someone who has it better than they do: a better house, better car, better job, higher income and so on.

    6. No Alternative

    This is a real and valid reason why bad habits are hard to break. These habits could fulfill a need that may not be met any other way.

    Someone who has physical or psychological limitations such as a disability or social anxiety may find it hard to quit obsessive content consumption for better habits.

    Alternately, a perfectly healthy person may be unable to quit smoking because alternates are just not working out.

    Similarly, a person who bites their nails when anxious may be unable to relieve stress in any other socially accepted manner.

    7. Stress

    As mentioned above, anything that stresses us out can lead to adopting and cementing bad habits.

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    When a person is stressed about something, it is easy to give in to a bad habit because the mental resources required to fight them are not available.

    Stress plays such a huge role in this that we commonly find a person who had previously managed to kick a bad habit fall back into the old ways because they felt their stress couldn’t be managed any other way.

    8. Sense of Failure

    People looking to kick bad habits may feel a strong sense of failure because it’s just that difficult.

    Dropping a bad habit usually means changes in lifestyle that people may be unwilling to make, or these changes might not be easy to make in spite of the will to make them.

    Over-eaters need to empty their house of unhealthy food, resist the urge to order in and not pick up their standard grocery items from the store.

    Those who drink too much need to avoid the bars or even people who drink often.

    If such people slip even once with a glass of wine or a smoke or a bag of chips, they tend to be excessively harsh on themselves and feel like failures.

    9. The Need to Be All-New

    People who are looking to break bad habits feel they need to re-create themselves in order to break themselves of their bad habits, while the truth is the complete opposite.

    These people actually need to go back to who they were before they developed the bad habit.

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    10. Force of Habit

    Humans are creatures of habit and having familiar, comforting outcomes for daily triggers helps us maintain a sense of balance in our lives.

    Consider people who are used to lighting up a cigarette every time they talk on the phone or munching on crisps when watching TV. They will always associate a phone call with a puff on the cigarette and screen time with eating.

    These habits, though bad, are a source of comfort to them as is meeting with those people they indulge in these bad habits with.

    Final Thoughts

    These are the main reasons why bad habits may be difficult to break but it is important to remember that the task is not impossible.

    Do you have bad habits you want to kick? My article How to Break a Bad Habit (and Replace It With a Good One) gives you tips on well, how to kick bad habits while my other article How Long Does It Take to Break a Habit? Science Will Tell You gives realistic information on what to expect while you’re trying to quit them.

    There are many compassionate, positive and self-loving techniques to kick bad habits. The internet is rich in information regarding bad habits, their effects and how to overcome them, while professional help is always available for those who feel they need it.

    Featured photo credit: NORTHFOLK via unsplash.com

    Reference

    [1] After Skool: Why Do Bad Habits Feel SO GOOD?

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