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The Most Amazing Locations From The Golden Age Of Film & TV

The Most Amazing Locations From The Golden Age Of Film & TV

Today, the locations are as much the stars as the actors and directors themselves. To celebrate the ‘golden age’ of film and TV we’re living in, travel experts Expedia have developed The World On Screen, an interactive guide to the most amazing, interesting locations seen in movies and TV. Working with city and culture bloggers, this is your go-to, street-level guide to what to see and do and eat and drink in destinations all over the world – from New York’s Ghostbusters to Mad Max: Fury Road’s Namibia.

Browse the map at your pleasure, or filter by genre or activity (road trip, beach break, city trip, country escape). So, if you’re currently planning a movie or TV-themed trip somewhere, why not get some inspiration with Expedia’s glorious guide? To wet your appetite, here’s a few of our choice favourites.

Road Trip

The Motorcycle Diaries: Things to do in South America

Charting Che Guevara’s journey from Buenos Aires to Peru in 1952, The Motorcycle Diaries is a celebration of south America’s amazing landscapes as much it is a look at the early life of the Marxist revolutionary (Guevara was 23 when he embarked on the trip along with friend Alberto Granado).

So saddle up and get the lowdown on the best things to see and do on a Motorcycle Diaries homage in South America:

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It was in Buenos Aires where Guevara began his grand tour. Check out Plaza Miserere – this is where the film’s opening scenes were shot.

Valparaisois is a sea port in Chile, where Guevara and Granado passed through. The beautiful city has funicular railways which feature in The Motorcycle Diaries.

The city of Cuzco in Peru is a must – be sure to visit the Cathedral of Santo Domingo which is in the film, before heading to the world-renowned Machu Picchu.

Country Escape

Game of Thrones: Northern Ireland

The phenomenally popular TV show based on the bestselling novels by George R.R. Martin is about the political power struggles between rival households in the mythical kingdom of Westeros. Much of this lauded show was shot in Northern Ireland:

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Castle Ward in County Down was used as Winterfell, the home of the Stark family. It’s thought that more than 2,500 people visit the castle every month.

The stretch of coast at Portstewart Strand in County Londonderry was used for filming as part of Game of Thrones series 5.

Downhill Beach, County Londonderry on the Causeway Coast is one of the most beautiful spots in Northern Ireland. In GoT, Downhill was transformed into Dragonstone in series 2.

City Break

GhostBusters: Things to do in New York

Does a film better visualise the Big Apple than Ghostbusters? OK, Woody Allen’s Manhattan might give it a run for its money, but this entertaining tale of four paranormal investigators chasing poltergeists, slime-balls and all manner of other creepy ghouls across NYC is the perfect advertisement for one of America’s best destinations.

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Charge up your proton pack and explore Ghostbusters’ New York:

The Ghostbusters HQ is the Ladder 8 Firehouse on the corner of North Moore and Varick Street – it’s a working firehouse and definitely should be top of your to-do list

Remember the brilliant opening scene with the librarian? That’s in the New York Public Library.

Enjoy a picnic on the steps of the Columbia University campus – a number of scenes were filmed here.

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Beach Break

Finding Nemo: Australia

OK so it’s an animation, but the beauty of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is laid bare in Pixar’s brilliant clownfish adventure Finding Nemo.

Dive into the sea and explore Finding Nemo’s Australia:

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest living organism on the planet – stretching for more than 2,000km from Brisbane to Thursday Island, it’s home to more than 600 types of coral and thousands of fish and other wildlife.

Cairns is the perfect place from which to explore the wonders of the sea – this beautiful coastal city sits in the middle of the Reef and offers plenty of watersports action, including snorkelling and scuba-diving.

Explore Expedia’s guide for more inspiration – and get your film or TV-themed holiday booked. If you have a favourite movie or small screen location, let us know.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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