Advertising
Advertising

9 Amazing French Singers That Will Make Your Life More Romantic

9 Amazing French Singers That Will Make Your Life More Romantic

We could all use a little more romance in our lives, and no matter what it is they are singing about, the French do romance incredibly well. There is something nostalgic, something so tenderly beautiful about the city of love and all its artistic history, including the aching words of its love songs, and the passion and the candor of their execution.

When was the last time you sat with a record player and a glass of wine and simply listened to the crooning of a French song? We may or may not be able to put our finger on why, but there really is no other kind of music that makes us feel exactly like French songs do. Here is a list of some of the best romantic singers that France has offered us.

Advertising

Brigitte Bardot

Was there anyone more beautiful than Brigitte Bardot? While better known perhaps for her acting roles than her singing, Bardot spent a significant amount of time producing some wonderful songs, the most famous of them perhaps being the 1968 hit Bonnie and Clyde, which she recorded with Serge Gainsbourg. Bardot’s music is sexy, dreamy, nostalgic. We dare you not to float away on the intoxicating French lyrics …

Serge Gainsbourg

Gainsbourg was a writer and producer who worked with numerous French women to create some of the most charming pop songs, albums and film scores from the 60s through to the 80s. It was his earlier work, however, that truly struck a chord. His work with Bardot and wife Jane Birkin is memorable, particularly the heated (and controversial) track Je T’aime Moi Non Plus which he shared vocally with Birkin.

Advertising

Edith Piaf

Perhaps the most famous of all the French singers, Piaf was indomitable. They called her “the little sparrow” and her legend has continued to grow posthumously. No singer has rivaled her since, for she was the most insane amalgamation of being street-smart, powerful, passionate and frail all at once. She learned to sing on the streets and was trained by professionals as she moved through the ranks to become the greatest French singer of all time. Her music cuts through you now, just the same as it always did.

Françoise Hardy

The prettiest French pop songs you ever will hear come from this singer. You will never tire of listening to Françoise.

Advertising

Jane Birkin

Also an actress, doe-eyed Birkin has a sensational music career to boot. First discovered by and then married to Gainsbourg, her tunes have a childish innocence while still oozing romance. The languid and poppy sweetness of her songs is the perfect slow-dance-after-dinner music.

Jacques Brel

Though Belgian-born, Brel composed and performed most of his songs in French. A friend and singing companion of Edith Piaf, Brel created some of the most beautiful, piano ballads and his songs were influential to the likes of David Bowie and Nina Simone.

Advertising

Marie Laforêt

A last minute replacing of her sister in a singing competition would suddenly veer into an illustrious pop career for the impassioned and beautiful Marie Laforêt. The videos of her live performances are compelling and emotionally charged, particularly her version of Viens Viens. Laforêt has a most unusual and distinguished singing voice, and her songs evoke passion and love. You’ll be singing in full (French) force in no time.

Carla Bruni

One could cook all their meals to a Carla Bruni album! Her smoky voice and gentle guitar makes you want to push open the windows and welcome in Spring (no matter what the season). It is the perfect floating-around-the-house music.

Frida Bocarra

Bocarra is a Moroccan-born multilingual French singer, also of Italian heritage. With an operatic vocal style and an orchestra behind her, Bocarra is the stuff of legends. The track Hundred Thousand Songs is the quintessential example of the idea behind this article. Do yourselves a favor — grab a glass of wine, sit back, close your eyes, and just listen.

Featured photo credit: Pixabay via pixabay.com

More by this author

25+ Quotes That Bring You Inner Peace To Face With Every Challenge What Is Lactose Intolerance And What To Do If You Have It Nutritionists Say Granola Bars Are Just Dressed Up Junk Food Researchers Explain Why People Often Feel Disappointed In The Dating World 3 Effective Home Remedies For Annoying Eczema

Trending in Culture

1 18 Dating Ideas with Breathtaking Scenery in the East of England 2 18 Things You Need To Know Before You Get Your First Tattoo 3 7 Tools to Optimize Your Next Long-Term Traveling Experience 4 What GoT Would Be Like if the Characters Used Social Media 5 30 Free Dating Ideas For Landscape-Lovers In Ireland

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

Advertising

3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Advertising

6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

Advertising

9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

Advertising

Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

Read Next