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This Spice Will Be Your Best Companion In Your Weight Loss Plan

This Spice Will Be Your Best Companion In Your Weight Loss Plan

Many of you are aware that a balanced diet and exercise is the recommended method for controlling body weight. Some people may turn to herbal products to promote health, well-being and weight loss. What if I told you that there is one spice that could help speed up this process? Sounds good, yes?

What is the name of this humble spice you ask?

CUMIN

Cumin is a great addition to your meals to help promote weight loss by reducing fat cells accumulating. This leads to not only a stabilization of your weight but also weight loss.

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) both as seeds or powder, has a nutty, peppery flavor. Cumin was once more widely used than it is today partly due to the fact that its peppery flavor made it a viable replacement for black pepper, which used to be very expensive and hard to come by (we are talking back over the centuries in this regard).

It Decreases Body Fat Percentage Significantly

According to a study done by Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Iran, women who added cumin into their diet had their body fat percentage decreased by more than 14% while the control group living a healthier lifestyle only had theirs decreased by around 5%.

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It Makes You Sleep Better And Hence Eat Less

When you don’t get enough sleep, you will eat more and gain weight, according to science, as it makes you feel hungrier and slows down your metabolism. Cumin would be great because it’s very useful for insomnia.

It Helps Balance Blood Sugar Levels And Hence Minimize Cravings

Cumin helps to balance blood sugar levels by increasing how sensitive cells are to both insulin and glucose, thus ensuring that your body responds well to them. By keeping your blood sugar levels in check cumin helps to minimize cravings for excessive carbohydrates as well as keeping you feeling satiated.

By consuming cumin regularly, you can balance your blood sugar, control your cravings and watch excess weight drop off.

Cumin is also rich in antioxidants and phytosterols. Phytosterols inhibit the absorption of harmful cholesterol in the digestive tract, which could be one explanation for their weight-reducing effect.

Cumin is also great for other issues that can indirectly interfere with your weight loss regime. If you suffer from digestive issues, for example, you may not be absorbing all the available nutrients in the food you eat causing you to experience cravings leading to binge eating.

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For an interesting treat that will keep your cravings at bay and incorporate healthy nuts and cumin into your diet try this Hot & Spicy Nut Snack I always have available in my pantry.

It Boost Digestion

The aroma created by cumin activates the salivary glands in your mouth, which helps get your digestive juices flowing and start the primary digestion of food.

Next, a compound called thymol, present in cumin, helps stimulates the glands that secrete acids, bile, and enzymes that are responsible for complete digestion of the food.

Cumin is also carminative. What this means for you is relief from gas troubles as well as relief from stomach aches when taken with hot water.

Interesting ways you can add cumin to your everyday diet and boost weight loss include:

1. Add ground cumin to roasted or sautéed veggies.

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2. Use it when you make hummus.

3. Make a cup of cumin tea. Simply boil the cumin seeds in water and let them steep for 10 minutes.

4. Toast cumin seeds, grind them in a coffee grinder, then sprinkle a teaspoon or so of the powder over nuts, salads or soups.

5. Use it to spice your soups, particularly lentil, or black bean soup.

6. Add it to plain brown rice to give it an exotic kick, especially if mixed with olive oil.

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7. Heat a tablespoon of olive oil or coconut oil in a pan. Add a teaspoon of cumin seeds. As soon as they begin to crackle, which will happen within seconds, tip in 1/4 tsp turmeric powder and two potatoes that have been boiled and diced. Stir well, adding sea salt to taste. When the potatoes are golden all over, take them off the heat and serve as a side with your main course. Try this at your next dinner party and it will be an instant hit!

8. Roasted cumin seeds with yogurt help constipation. A delicious meal accompaniment to aid digestion is raita (yoghurt with cucumber) drizzled with roasted cumin seeds.

If you would like to find out more ideas for weight loss check out this article.

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Last Updated on January 13, 2020

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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