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3 Signs of Heroin Addiction in Adults

3 Signs of Heroin Addiction in Adults

Heroin users become dependent on the drug quickly, both physically and psychologically. With such a dangerous dependency, the risk of overdosing is high.

If you suspect a friend or loved one is using heroin, you need to be able to recognize the signs. Spotting signs and taking action can help save lives. From finding drug paraphernalia to noticing physical and behavioral changes, you may be able to help your loved one take the first step towards recovery.

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Drugs and Drug Paraphernalia

Heroin can be sniffed, smoked, or injected, though the most common method is by injection. Depending on how someone is using heroin, you may spot different paraphernalia lying around the house or in a frequently used vehicle. These items include but are not limited to:

  • Syringes (these are a major warning sign if the person doesn’t need needles for medical purposes)
  • Rubber tubing, belts, rope, or other materials that could be used as a tourniquet (to enlarge veins for easier injecting)
  • Lighters, matches, or candles (to melt the heroin)
  • Dirty or burnt spoons or bowls
  • Q-tip buds or cigarette filters
  • Small metal or glass pipes (for smoking heroin)
  • Aluminum foil shaped into a straw (for smoking)
  • Empty pen cases and rolled dollar bills (for snorting or smoking)
  • Small, colorful baggies or brightly colored balloons that are tied but not inflated (to hide the drug)
  • Laxatives (to relieve the symptom of constipation)

Heroin users often keep the paraphernalia in a kit called a rig, outfit, or “the works.” They may stash it in their bedrooms or bathrooms.

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You may also find remnants of the drug itself. The appearance varies from an off-white to tan or brown color and is crumbly or powdery. Black tar heroin, like its label implies, is sticky.

Physical Changes

Immediately after using heroin, signs include

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  • Flushed skin
  • Constricted pupils lasting approximately four to five hours
  • Slurred speech
  • Disoriented behavior
  • Nodding off suddenly, increased drowsiness, or drifting in and out of consciousness
  • Slowed or shallow breathing (contributing factor to a lethal overdose)
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Itching
  • Runny nose
  • Blue lips or fingernails, clammy skin and shaking (overdose indicators)

Other physical signs or illnesses that may indicate long-term use:

  • Needle marks, scars, bruises, or scabs (usually noticeable on hands and arms but may be visible on the neck or ankles)
  • Skin infections or rashes
  • Constipation
  • HIV/AIDS or hepatitis

Many addicts go through a cycle of use and withdrawal, suffering physical withdrawal symptoms like diarrhea, stomach and muscle cramps, and tremors.

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Behavioral Changes

You may notice drastic changes in a loved one that can happen suddenly or over a period of time. Be aware of these changes:

  • Eating less or weight loss
  • Changes in mood, including erratic behavior and aggressiveness
  • Withdrawing from friends, family, and social activities
  • A new crowd of friends (other users or dealers)
  • Anxiousness or restlessness
  • Neglecting personal hygiene
  • Worn down or gaunt appearance
  • Wearing long sleeves, even in warm weather (to cover needle marks)
  • Confusion, difficulty thinking or making decisions
  • Sleeping more frequently or at odd hours
  • Sudden drops in energy

More complex behavioral changes include:

  • Acting secretive, lying, making excuses for excessive sleep, loss of employment, or the inability to explain where they’ve been.
  • Manipulation and loss of relationships with family and friends. Secrecy regarding new friends.
  • Money problems, like a drained bank account. A user may ask for a loan or frequent small amounts of money. Stealing money and valuables from family and friends.
  • Ongoing problems with law enforcement, leading to hefty fines or jail time.

Heroin addiction is a growing problem, and once someone begins using, it becomes very difficult to quit this life-threatening habit alone. Recognizing the signs of use and taking action can help your loved one.

Featured photo credit: Jake Melara from Magdeleine.co via magdeleine.co

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Dan Gellman

Director of Marketing for High Focus Centers

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Last Updated on May 28, 2020

How to Overcome Boredom

How to Overcome Boredom

Have you ever been bored? Restless? Fidgety? In need of some inspiration?

I have a theory on boredom. I believe that the rate of boredom has increased alongside the pace of technology.

If you think about it, technology has provided us with mobile phones, laptops, Ipads, device after device – all to ultimately fix one problem: boredom.

What is Boredom?

We have become a global nation that feeds on entertainment. We associate ‘living’ with ‘doing’. People now do not know how to sit still, and we feel guilty when we are not doing anything. Today, inactivity has become the ultimate sin.

You might not realize it, but boredom stimulates a form of anxiety and stress. It evokes an emotional state that creates frustration and feeds procrastination.

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It’s a desire to be ‘doing something’ or to be ‘entertained’ – it’s a desire for sensory stimulation. What it boils down to is a lack of focus.

If you think about those times when you’re bored, it’s usually because you did not know what to do. So, indecision also plays a big part.

When we are focused on what’s important to us and what we want to achieve, it’s pretty hard to be bored. So, one answer to boredom is to become focused on what you want.

Sometimes It’s Good to Be Bored

If boredom is a desire for sensory stimulation – then what’s the opposite of that? To be content with no stimulation – in other words – to enjoy stillness.

Sometimes, it’s not boredom itself that causes the frustration but the resistance to doing nothing.

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Think about it. What would happen if you were to ‘let go’ of the desire to be entertained? You wouldn’t be bored anymore, and you will feel more relaxed!

In my experience, it’s often the most obvious, simplistic solutions that are the most powerful in life. So, when you’re bored, the easiest way to combat this is to enjoy it.

It may sound weird but think of ‘boredom’ as a form of ‘relaxation’. It’s a break from the constant stimulation that 21st-century living provides – constant TVs, mobile phones, radios, internet, emails, phone calls, etc.

Who knows, maybe ‘boredom’ is actually good for us?

Next time you’re ‘feeling bored’ instead of feeding the frustration by frantically looking for something to do, maybe you can sit back, relax, and savor the feeling of having nothing to do.

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In this article, I’ll share with you my 3-step strategy on how to overcome boredom.

3-Step Strategy to Overcome Boredom

1. Get Focused

Instead of chasing sensory stimulation at random, focus on what’s really important to you. Focusing on something important helps prevent boredom because it forces you to utilize your time productively.

You should ask yourself: what would make good use of your time? What could you be doing that would contribute to your major goals in life?

Here are a few ideas:

  • Spend some time in quiet contemplation considering what’s important to you.
  • Start that creative project you’ve been talking about for the last few weeks.
  • Brainstorm: think of some ideas for new innovative products or businesses.

2. Kill Procrastination

Boredom is useful in some ways because it gives you the energy and time to do things. It is only a problem if you let it. But if you use it to motivate yourself to be productive, then you can more easily overcome boredom.

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So, the next time you’re bored, why not put this good energy to use by ticking off those things that you have been meaning to get done but have been too busy to finish? This also presents a great time for you to clear your to-do list.

Here are some ideas:

  • Do some exercise.
  • Read a book.
  • Learn something new.
  • Call a friend.
  • Get creative (draw, paint, sculpt, create music, write).
  • Do a spring cleaning.
  • Wash the car.
  • Renovate the house.
  • Re-arrange the furniture.
  • Write your shopping list.
  • Water the plants.
  • Walk the dog.
  • Sort out your mail & email.
  • De-clutter (clear out that wardrobe).

3. Enjoy Boredom

If none of the above solutions work, then you can try a different approach. Don’t give in to boredom and instead choose to enjoy it. This doesn’t mean allowing yourself to waste your time being bored. Instead, think of it as your time to relax and re-energize, which will help you be more productive the next time you work.

Contrary to popular belief, we don’t need to be constantly doing things to be productive. In fact, research has shown that people are more productive when they take periods of rest to recharge.[1] Taking breaks once in a while helps boost your performance and can help make you feel more motivated.

So, take some time to relax. You never know, you might even like it.

Final Thoughts

Learning how to overcome boredom may be difficult at the beginning, but it can be easier if you make use of some techniques. You can start with my 3-step strategy on how to overcome boredom and work your way from there. So, ready your mind and make use of these tips, and you will be overcoming boredom in no time.

More Tips on Overcoming Boredom

Featured photo credit: Johnny Cohen via unsplash.com

Reference

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