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5 Stretches For Lower Back Pain Relief

5 Stretches For Lower Back Pain Relief

Until or unless your back goes out, this is not a part of your body that you’ve probably given much thought to. However, if you are suffering from back pain, you realize very quickly just how much you use your back in the course of a given day. Your back is actually a complicated and amazing configuration of vertebrae, disc, bones, ligaments and muscles that help your body to bend, sway and stretch as you go about your daily routine. So to baby your back – and to both treat and prevent lower back pain – try these stretches below.

To further alleviate lower back pain, you can’t miss the following posts:

Lower Left Back Pain: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

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Lower Right Back Pain: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

5 Effective Yoga Exercises For Lower Back Pain

The Hamstring Stretch

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    In order to do this stretch — which will work out not only your hamstrings but your lower back as well — lie flat on the floor on your back. Bend your right knee into your chest, then straighten the leg slowly towards the ceiling (you can wrap an exercise band around the bottom of your feet to help keep your leg in place if desired). Do not overstretch. Hold in position for 3-5 minutes, then slowly lower the leg to the floor.

    The Downward-Facing Dog

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      This position is one of the best stretches for lower back pain will give your back a deep, gentle stretch, while also working out your hamstrings and calf muscles and strengthening the muscles in your arms. Begin on your hands and knees, with your hands shoulders-width apart and your hands planted firmly on the floor. While breathing out slowly, raise up on your tip-toes and slowly lift your buttocks off the floor so that your body bends in the shape of an “A”. Your weight should be supported by both your hands and your feet. Hold this pose for several minutes, breathing in and our easily, then reverse it by lower your buttocks and legs slowly to the mat. Rest for a few minutes in a prone position.

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      The Bow

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        This provides a deep, relaxing stretch for the muscles in your lower and upper back while strengthening the muscles in your arms and legs. First, bend your knees and set feet on the floor, then bend elbows and spread palms out on the floor behind you. Slowly, lift yourself up on your arms and legs so that you are bent backwards with your navel raised towards the ceiling and your weight balanced equally between arms and legs. Hold for several moments, then lower yourself slowly and gently to the mat.

        The Plow

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          Lie on your back with arms beside you, pressing down against the floor. As you breathe in slowly, lift your feet off the floor and raise your legs towards the ceiling. Then swing your hips upwards and support them on your hands. Then, still breathing gently, lower your legs up and over your head so that your toes touch the floor behind you. Hold this pose for a minute, then gently swing your legs back and resume a prone position.

          The Triangle Pose

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            This position allows you not only to get a great stretch for your lower back but your lateral muscles (the muscles along your sides) as well. In order to begin this pose, get into a standing position with your feet 3-4 feet apart. Raise your arms to shoulder height so that they are parrellel to the floor. Then, turning your left foot in, breathe out and bend your torso to the right and bend from the hips so that your hand can touch your calf, ankle or the floor, depending on how deep you want to stretch. While exhaling, pull yourself back to a standing position and lower your arms.

            If you are suffering from back pain, these poses can help to stretch the muscles gently and get you back on your feet again. However, it is important to talk to your doctor before doing these or any other exercises to make sure they are right for you. You should also discuss a care plan which combines these exercises with the use of anti-inflammatory medications, muscle relaxers, rest and warm or cold applications to help treat this condition.

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            Brian Wu

            Health Writer, Author

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            Published on October 17, 2019

            How to Build Endurance Fast and Enhance Stamina

            How to Build Endurance Fast and Enhance Stamina

            Day to day we all suffer. Life is hard, have you ever got to work and just stopped right in front of the stairs and just absolutely dreaded the thought of having to go up to them? By the top, you’re out of breath, uncomfortable and sweating.

            So, how to build endurance fast and enhance stamina? We will look into the tips in this article.

            What Is the Best Exercise for Endurance?

            When faced with any exercise venture, we will always ask ourselves “What is the best way to get to our goals?”

            Really it does depend. Why do I say this?

            There are a lot of variables as to what form of exercise I might recommend for you. Not to worry I just won’t leave it there. I’ll give you examples that will fit for many different scenarios.

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            When recommending forms of cardio for people, you have to examine many things like, how long have they been training, their age, any injuries that were diagnosed by a medical professional and just some nagging pains that they may have from overly tight muscles.

            When faced with someone who is very under trained, has worked years at a desk, and hasn’t trained in decades, I would recommend a non-impact form of cardio like a bike, elliptical, row, reason being that their muscles, tendons and ligaments aren’t used to bearing hundreds of pounds of impact that is caused every single time we jump, land, run. This same idea would go for someone who has any kind of arthritis in the knees, back etc.

            When faced with running, and sprinting, I would recommend these modes of cardio to those clients that have experience with these forms of cardio, whether that be athletes or just casual runners; of course, assuming that they have good running technique and footwear. Without good running technique or footwear, you are bound to run into some sort of injury eventually.

            Types of Cardio: LISS Vs HIIT, Which Is Better?

            There are two main forms of cardio that people are familiar with or have heard of.

            One of them is “LISS” which stands for low intensity steady state. This form of cardio wood be represented by a form of cardio that is not very taxing and doesn’t involve any sort of intervals. A good example would be walking on the treadmill on a slight incline and moderate paced walk that you are able to keep up for approximately an hour.

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            Currently on fire, the very well known form of cardio “HIIT” which stands for high intensity interval training. This cardio is very intense and includes spurts of near maximal effort followed by a complete rest or active recovery (walking). Perfect example of a HIIT workout would be interval sprints, sprinting maximal effort for 20 seconds followed by a minute of walking (1:3 work to rest).

            Now that you know what they are, you may be asking which one is better for you. And the answer is, both! Both will build your endurance and when we combine both of them into your training protocol, you will build your endurance and stamina even faster than just using one or the other!

            Here’s a routine you can take reference of:

            Mock Training Week (Novice Trainee)

            • Monday: HIIT sprint (1:3 work to rest) 20 min
            • Tuesday: LISS bike (slight resistance) 60 minute
            • Wednesday: LISS walk (outside if possible) if not slight incline light pace, 60 minutes
            • Thursday: OFF
            • Friday: HIIT row machine(1:2 work to rest) 20 minutes
            • Saturday: LISS walk (outside if possible) if on treadmill small incline, light pace
            • Sunday: OFF

            *the allotted work to rest ratio will vary based on the level of physical fitness of the individual

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            How to Build Your Physical Endurance

            When building a customized cardio program, it is very important to know your baseline level of cardio done via fitness testing. These tests will give you a good measure from where you are starting, so you can easily measure your progress a few months down the road.

            If you’re not familiar with exercising programming and really want to train efficiently and with good form, it would be a good idea to hire a Personal Trainer. The trainer will be familiar with performing these types of fitness test and can ensure they are being performed exactly the same each time to ensure accurate results. A Personal Trainer can also help you build a customized cardio program tailored to your goal of building endurance based on your current fitness levels.

            How Endurance Is Actually Built

            Endurance is actually built by challenging our base fitness of cardio which in turn build our Vo2 Max (most amount of oxygen we can use during exercise), which is the best measure of cardio/endurance.

            In order to challenge our endurance, we must make our heart more efficient. A good measure to see if you are improving would be to do a run for 5 minutes at a certain speed on the treadmill and then measure your Heart Rate immediately after; then repeat that exact test 8 weeks down the road to measure your progress that way.

            Another good way to measure our progress would be by increasing the difficulty of your workouts weekly/bi-weekly so you can see that you are progressing week to week.

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            Final Thoughts

            Besides the workout advice above, I suggest you combine all these following quick tips:

            • Eat healthy and unprocessed foods.
            • Challenge your cardio/endurance (train with intensity).
            • Train frequently.
            • Track your progress.
            • Get to a healthy body weight.
            • Build a good cardio program.
            • Have a goal.

            Do these consistently because without sustainability, we will not see the most amount of results possible.

            Great changes require consistency and hard work. Keep at it and follow your goals, results will come!

            Featured photo credit: asoggetti via unsplash.com

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