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Science Finds An Interesting Link Between Wisdom And Heart Rates

Science Finds An Interesting Link Between Wisdom And Heart Rates

For those that believe true wisdom comes from the heart may actually not be far from the truth. A new study has been published in the journal Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience that suggests heart rate variation and thinking processes actually work together to create wise reasoning and the understanding of complex social issues.

What The Study Involved

The study was carried out by Igor Grossmann, professor of psychology at the University of Waterloo in Canada and his colleagues at the Australian Catholic University. They wanted to find out whether or not wisdom has purely to do with cognitive reasoning or if something else was at play.

The team used 150 participants from a Sydney university with the average age of 25 and asked them to take part in several tasks including tasks that involved social reasoning and attributional judgement. The participants were required to give their opinions on subjects they felt strongly about from two perspectives; the first person (in a personal manner) and third person (as a critical observer). They were then monitored for their resting heart rate variability throughout the task using an electrocardiogram (ECG) and all experiments were conducted during low physical activity.

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Heart rates vary naturally at any given time; even when we’re sitting down and resting. The variations between heartbeats are directly linked to the nervous system’s controlling ability of organ functions. However, for various reasons some people’s heart rates vary much more than others.

The Results

What the researchers found from the results of the experiment was surprising: the participants who discussed the topics with a third-person perspective and possessed a greater heart rate variation were found to have a wiser and less biased view than those that had a smaller heart rate variation.

However this changed when the first-person perspective was used where they discovered that there was no indication of a link between heart rate variation and wiser judgement.

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What Does This Mean?

This is the first study to show that the physiology of the heart and, in particular, heart rate variations are related to less biased, wiser judgment and reasoning.

It has already been discovered through previous studies that people with a higher heart rate variation tend to have a better ability in the use of memory. Professor Grossman explains that the study shows that cognitive ability isn’t the only element at play when it comes to being wise:

“Research shows that wise reasoning is not exclusively a function of the mind and cognitive ability. We found that people who have greater heart rate variability and who are able to think about social problems from a distanced viewpoint demonstrate a greater capacity for wise reasoning.”

However, this doesn’t necessarily mean people with a greater heart rate variation are automatically wiser than others. People need to learn and take time to reflect on altruistic issues that come with third-person perspectives and reasoning in order to achieve the ability to possess wiser judgement.

“To channel their cognitive abilities for wiser judgement, people with greater heart rate variability first need to overcome their egocentric viewpoints.”

Either way, the study is an interesting insight into the relationship between physiology and cognitive understanding which will no doubt lead the way to further research into how the heart’s functioning really does impact the mind.

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Featured photo credit: kaboompics via pexels.com

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Jenny Marchal

Freelance Writer

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Last Updated on September 10, 2018

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

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Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

Looking at images of loved ones

While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

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In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

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Exercise

Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

Meditation

Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

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In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

Reference

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