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When You Feel Heartbroken, Your Physical Heart Might Hurt Too, Science Says

When You Feel Heartbroken, Your Physical Heart Might Hurt Too, Science Says

A broken heart has been utilized as an image to describe what the deepest sadness can truly be. It usually comes from losing a partner or being placed in a spot of desperation and destructive depression. It’s a moment of time that leaves a person distraught and at a loss for what to do next. It’s one thing that many face when dealing with a terrible breakup or when a person they care for passes away. It has probably happened to you before, and whether or not you have overcome it, just know that others have gone through it and have felt the tearing apart of the heart that comes with the feeling.

It Feels Like A Heart Attack

Researchers have been studying if feeling heartbroken has a physical side too, as it’s always been just a way of expressing how upset or distressed a person is about the current situation. What they have found is something called “stress cardiomyopathy,” which causes a person to feel like they are having a heart attack. But now, new research has been done on atrial fibrillation, in which the stressors involved with the event cause the heart to beat in an irregular pattern. In the American study, researchers found that there is a high chance of developing atrial fibrillation as soon as a month after a loved one passes, and this risk remains high for up to a year. The more suddenly the event happened, the more at risk a person would be. They found that younger people have a greater risk of developing the irregular beat pattern.

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This study is another example of how beautiful the human body is, showing a connection between both the mind and the heart. When the mind is in a mental state of despair, the body takes notice and reacts. In this case, it’s not entirely certain that the atrial fibrillation was directly caused by the experienced loss, but the positive correlation suggests that it helps increase the risk. That is what is important here. The body reacts to the news and shock in its own way, a way that potentially causes the beating muscle that is often associated with love itself to go into its own shock and change. It’s heavily indicated by the research that extreme traumatic stress can mess with how the heart and body continue to function, almost leaving a person feeling like a shell, trapped by their deep sense of heartbreak.

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“Bereavement is a major life event, which is known to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, mental illness and death,” notes the study. All three of these factors together can run rampant in a person’s body and cause them to feel trapped. Hearts can actually be broken.

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What To Do

There are other ways to try and decrease stress caused by heartbreak. These include meditation, yoga, exercise, finding new hobbies, and centralizing your breathing. I remember a friend of mine telling me that breathing is the best way to soothe the corrupt soul that arises from stressful situations. “Ten deep breaths,” she always told me. I have believed in this ever since, and now I wonder how much simply breathing deeply can help you deal with heart-breaking feelings. A heart doesn’t have to be broken.

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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