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Sinus Headache: Symptoms, Causes And Natural Reliefs

Sinus Headache: Symptoms, Causes And Natural Reliefs

If you’ve ever had a sinus headache, you know what a real pain it is (literally and figuratively speaking). There are many over-the-counter medications you can take to help relieve a sinus headache, but you may want to think twice before you resort to those all the time. Why? Because even though these options may cover up the symptoms of your sinus headache temporarily, they’re not the best for treating it long-term and don’t address the real issue at hand.

What a Sinus Headache Feels Like

Sinus Headache

    A sinus headache will feel as though you have a tight clamp on each side of your head, and you’ll feel this due to pressure caused by a build-up of fluids. You’ll also usually feel your nasal passages clogged and likely have problems with mucus in your throat. You may find yourself constantly coughing or trying to clear your throat with corresponding tension headaches when suffering (whether daily or occasionally).

    It’s not exactly what you’re suffering from? Then you need to check if you have one of the following headaches instead and learn about how to deal with it:

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    Tension Headache: Understanding Of The Most Common Headache

    Cluster Headaches: How To Deal With The Worst Headache

    How To Get Rid Of A Headache Without Medicine

    Causes of Sinus Headaches

    Research shows that sinus headaches are the result of overall body inflammation – not actually from allergies alone. Other possible causes of sinus headaches include a respiratory infection, congestion due to mucus build up in the body or an illness such as the flu. Allergies can also trigger sinus headaches or exacerbate existing ones.

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    Normal sinus pathways allow mucus to drain and air to circulate through the lungs and nasal passages, but when inflammation occurs in the body, these pathways and processes don’t work as they normally would. This can lead to a host of negative issues because blocked nasal passages are the perfect breeding ground for harmful viruses and bacteria that can affect you long-term.

    Colds are a common culprit for triggering sinus headaches, but those who swim frequently, suffer from asthma or hay fever, and those with nasal polyps or facial tumors may also be more susceptible than other people.

    Natural Options for Relieving a Sinus Headache

    Sinus Headache

      First, you’ll want to check with your doctor to make sure you have a sinus headache and not something else. Once he or she diagnoses you, here are natural remedies you can do at home to relieve inflammation and even the possible cause(s) of your sinus headaches:

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      1. Remove all possible allergenic foods

      Many people are allergic to certain foods they are eating which is causing the inflammation and mucus build-up. Common allergens are gluten (wheat, barley, rye), just wheat, dairy, soy, and although it’s not an allergy, excessive refined sugar intake can also lead to inflammation and mucus build-up. Consider removing these from your diet to see which ones may be causing issues for you, and then reintroduce each one, one at a time to see if the food is causing mucus build-up for you or overall inflammation. Check labels on all foods you buy, and consider an elimination diet which may also be effective.

      2. Drink plenty of water and avoid excessive caffeine and sugar.

      Excessive caffeine and sugar intake can trigger inflammation as well as headaches due to the way they affect blood sugar levels and blood pressure levels when they leave the bloodstream. Be sure to drink plenty of water which is your best option for getting your lymph fluids flowing. Warm (low-sodium) broths may also be helpful as well.

      3. Use a humidifier to help you breathe more easily.

      Place a humidifier in your room each night and let it run while you sleep. This can help you wake up a little clearer in the morning because it helps get mucus moving through the body so you can breathe more easily.

      4. Use cold packs on your head to relieve pain.

      Ice packs can help dispel the pain from your head by triggering a unique process in the bloodstream and nerve pathways to help relieve pain. You can make cold packs from ice yourself with ice cubes and cloth or plastic baggies. Or, you can buy ice packs at your local drugstore. Place the ice pack on your head ensuring it covers the sides of your head and nose for at least 30 seconds. Consider taking a hot bath each night as you do so for greater effects.

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      5. Rub peppermint oil on the sides of your head.

      Rubbing peppermint oil on your the sides of your head can help relieve pain quickly and the menthol will also help you breathe more easily. Be sure to rub it in for a few minutes, gently massaging the sides of your head as you do so.

      6. Drink some warm lemon ginger tea.

      Make your own warm cup of tea with fresh ginger root and lemon slices. Just let them steep in boiling water for at least 5 minutes, then strain and drink the tea a few times a day. (You can also just make this tea in a French press.) Lemon and ginger both help relieve inflammation, pain, and can clear mucus from the body.

      7. Use over-the-counter sprays as the last option or as a complimentary treatment.

      If you need additional care when you’re trying to survive your sinus headache, use saline sprays as a last option or complimentary treatment. Just be mindful that these don’t treat the actual cause of your sinus headache even though they do serve as helpful aids.

      Everyone suffers from sinus headaches for various reasons, so do your best to address the real cause of your sinus headache, and speak with a trusted naturopath or medical professional who is willing to help you through the process.

      To learn more about natural options to relieve general headaches, check out these options that can help you do so without medication.

      Featured photo credit: Flickr / Gonzalo Malpartida via flic.kr

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      Last Updated on June 13, 2019

      5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

      5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

      Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

      You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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      1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

      It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

      Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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      2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

      If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

      3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

      If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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      4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

      A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

      5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

      If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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      Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

      Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

      Reference

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