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Cuba Travel Guide: How To Travel There Now

Cuba Travel Guide: How To Travel There Now

Are you feeling antsy and want to get to Cuba now instead of waiting until there are direct flights to the country? Read on. We’ll tell you how to go there before the droves of tourists and what to expect when direct flights to Cuba start later this year.

Cuba has long been the unvisited island in the Caribbean for Americans — a hot topic of history, foreign relations, and controversy, even today. President Barack Obama’s visit to Cuba last month was the first by a sitting U.S. president since Calvin Coolidge in 1928. Later this year, U.S. airlines will begin flights to Havana (HAV), Camagüey (CMW), Cienfuegos (CFG), Holguín (HOG) and Santa Clara (SNU), while Starwood Hotels and Marriott International will offer accommodations and Airbnb will expand services to visitors from all countries.

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What you need to know if you want to go to Cuba NOW:

At the present time, Americans are still barred from traveling to Cuba as tourists, but there are 12 other legal travel categories that U.S. citizens may fit into, and all that is required is what’s called a “general license.”

If you can check the box for one of the following, then keep reading:

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  • Family visits (Relatives there? You’re in!)
  • Official business of the U.S. government, foreign governments, and certain intergovernmental organizations (You might be a little more “special” than the average tourist if this is you.)
  • Journalistic activity (Can you write? Keep a journal? A daily blog?)
  • Professional research and professional meetings (Researcher? Writer? Business person? Check this one.)
  • Educational activities (Teacher? Student? World explorer?)
  • Religious activities (You probably don’t want to perform a rain dance in the streets, but hey, if you’re there on religious business, that works.)
  • Public performances, clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions (This time, it may be appropriate to perform a dance or song in the street.)
  • Support for the Cuban people (You’ll be buying their coffee, cigars, and food and loving it. Be a good guest when you’re there.)
  • Humanitarian projects (You selfless person, you.)
  • Activities of private foundations or research or educational institutes (Similar to some of the above, but you’re more private about it.)
  • Exportation, importation, or transmission of information or information materials (This one might be tricky, so unless you know for certain that this is your category, refer to the right person.)
  • Certain authorized export transactions (Same as above.)

The bottom line is that you should document everything you do there each day in a journal of some sort and take lots of pictures. Be sure to keep them all handy for the next 5 years should anyone from Uncle Sam come a-knockin’.

Next, get your legal documents in order. This includes an up-to-date passport with at least two empty pages and a visa. If you’re traveling with a tour group, most likely the organizers will prepare them for you. If you’re flying solo, the U.S. Government will refer you to the Cuban Interests Section. Look for the information on “consular services for foreigners.”

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Lastly, book your flight. Easy enough? Well, it soon will be, but not quite yet. You have two options right now:

  1. Book flights to Cuba via another country. Yes, this will involve two transactions. No, it’s not difficult, just a little more time-consuming. For example, book a flight from your nearest airport to a city in Mexico, then book a second flight from Mexico to Cuba.
  2. Book flights to Cuba via air charters. More airlines are jumping on this route (pun intended). JetBlue is the latest, offering weekly charter flights form New York to Havana, while Sun Country also flies there. However, be aware that those airlines have only partnered with charters, and flights are still booked through the charter company, not the airline (at this time).

What you need to know if you want to go to Cuba later this year:

The U.S. has authorized 110 daily flights to Cuba in the coming year. The following airlines have submitted applications to fly there: JetBlue, United, Southwest, Delta, Alaska and American.

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We should know more about the exact routes this summer. For your convenience, the U.S has made some embargo changes so you can eventually have U.S. dollar transactions there as well. Until then, you will have to deal with their dual-currency system of the CUC (1:1 ratio to the US dollar that fuels the tourist economy) and the CUP (the regular Cuban peso, which is what the locals use).

Stay on top of the latest Cuba travel news with FareCompare, and don’t forget to compare flights before you buy (and especially when the flood gates open this year for direct flights to Cuba!).

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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