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Cuba Travel Guide: How To Travel There Now

Cuba Travel Guide: How To Travel There Now

Are you feeling antsy and want to get to Cuba now instead of waiting until there are direct flights to the country? Read on. We’ll tell you how to go there before the droves of tourists and what to expect when direct flights to Cuba start later this year.

Cuba has long been the unvisited island in the Caribbean for Americans — a hot topic of history, foreign relations, and controversy, even today. President Barack Obama’s visit to Cuba last month was the first by a sitting U.S. president since Calvin Coolidge in 1928. Later this year, U.S. airlines will begin flights to Havana (HAV), Camagüey (CMW), Cienfuegos (CFG), Holguín (HOG) and Santa Clara (SNU), while Starwood Hotels and Marriott International will offer accommodations and Airbnb will expand services to visitors from all countries.

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What you need to know if you want to go to Cuba NOW:

At the present time, Americans are still barred from traveling to Cuba as tourists, but there are 12 other legal travel categories that U.S. citizens may fit into, and all that is required is what’s called a “general license.”

If you can check the box for one of the following, then keep reading:

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  • Family visits (Relatives there? You’re in!)
  • Official business of the U.S. government, foreign governments, and certain intergovernmental organizations (You might be a little more “special” than the average tourist if this is you.)
  • Journalistic activity (Can you write? Keep a journal? A daily blog?)
  • Professional research and professional meetings (Researcher? Writer? Business person? Check this one.)
  • Educational activities (Teacher? Student? World explorer?)
  • Religious activities (You probably don’t want to perform a rain dance in the streets, but hey, if you’re there on religious business, that works.)
  • Public performances, clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions (This time, it may be appropriate to perform a dance or song in the street.)
  • Support for the Cuban people (You’ll be buying their coffee, cigars, and food and loving it. Be a good guest when you’re there.)
  • Humanitarian projects (You selfless person, you.)
  • Activities of private foundations or research or educational institutes (Similar to some of the above, but you’re more private about it.)
  • Exportation, importation, or transmission of information or information materials (This one might be tricky, so unless you know for certain that this is your category, refer to the right person.)
  • Certain authorized export transactions (Same as above.)

The bottom line is that you should document everything you do there each day in a journal of some sort and take lots of pictures. Be sure to keep them all handy for the next 5 years should anyone from Uncle Sam come a-knockin’.

Next, get your legal documents in order. This includes an up-to-date passport with at least two empty pages and a visa. If you’re traveling with a tour group, most likely the organizers will prepare them for you. If you’re flying solo, the U.S. Government will refer you to the Cuban Interests Section. Look for the information on “consular services for foreigners.”

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Lastly, book your flight. Easy enough? Well, it soon will be, but not quite yet. You have two options right now:

  1. Book flights to Cuba via another country. Yes, this will involve two transactions. No, it’s not difficult, just a little more time-consuming. For example, book a flight from your nearest airport to a city in Mexico, then book a second flight from Mexico to Cuba.
  2. Book flights to Cuba via air charters. More airlines are jumping on this route (pun intended). JetBlue is the latest, offering weekly charter flights form New York to Havana, while Sun Country also flies there. However, be aware that those airlines have only partnered with charters, and flights are still booked through the charter company, not the airline (at this time).

What you need to know if you want to go to Cuba later this year:

The U.S. has authorized 110 daily flights to Cuba in the coming year. The following airlines have submitted applications to fly there: JetBlue, United, Southwest, Delta, Alaska and American.

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We should know more about the exact routes this summer. For your convenience, the U.S has made some embargo changes so you can eventually have U.S. dollar transactions there as well. Until then, you will have to deal with their dual-currency system of the CUC (1:1 ratio to the US dollar that fuels the tourist economy) and the CUP (the regular Cuban peso, which is what the locals use).

Stay on top of the latest Cuba travel news with FareCompare, and don’t forget to compare flights before you buy (and especially when the flood gates open this year for direct flights to Cuba!).

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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Review Your Past Flow

Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

    Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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