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5 Of Europe’s Best Cities for EDM Lovers

5 Of Europe’s Best Cities for EDM Lovers

The American EDM (electronic dance music) scene has continued to thrive for the last few years. But we should never forget that at the end of the day, EDM was popularized in dance clubs and raves throughout Europe. And Europe continues to be where the very best EDM clubs, festivals, and DJs live, further showcased through festivals like Tomorrowland and the Electric Love Festival.

So where are the best spots in Europe for a good night of dancing? Here are five cities which represent the epitome of EDM culture, and where an enthusiast can have the best time. We look at cities with a rich history of EDM music, a thriving culture with great clubs and DJs, and are generally attractive tourist spots.

Berlin

Berlin is an obvious choice, but it still must be mentioned. EDM has been part of Berlin culture all the way back to the days of the Berlin Wall, when Loveparade began in 1989 and ran for 14 years. There is no city in Europe which has as many EDM clubs as Berlin, whether it is Tresor, Golden Gate, or Berghain. DJs flock to Berlin in order to ply their trade just as classical musicians came there in the 18th and 19th centuries. Some of the top DJs include Paul van Dyk, PanPot, and AndHim.

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If that was not good enough, there are a great deal of music festivals outside of Berlin that are only a short car or bus ride away. This year, the annual Fusion Festival will last from June 29th to July 3rd, with the Melt Festival occurring a few weeks later.

Prague

Even if you ignore music altogether, Prague is one of the most underrated tourist cities in Europe. It may not have the reputation of Paris or London, but it is cheap and has a fantastic nightlife full of bars, clubs, and anything else you might want.

And there are at least half a dozen clubs I know of which open all night and play great beats. Karlovy Lázně is one of the best-known clubs in Europe, featuring any kind of music that you might want. But if you’re interested in a true EDM experience without running into a lot of silly tourists, I would recommend Club Roxy. It’s a bit expensive by Czech standards, but compensates with a great dance floor and light show.

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Amsterdam

I could begin and end this section by noting that this is the home of the Amsterdam Dance Event every October, and that alone should be enough to attract any EDM lover.

But there is so much more to Amsterdam’s EDM scene than just that fact. Amsterdam has a rich electronic and techno history since the 1980s, and this influence continues to be felt with clubs like Paradiso and Melkweg. Amsterdam’s clubs are also unique in that many of them were abandoned buildings before being picked up for music, giving them a unique flair.

And if you want to visit Amsterdam sooner than October, there are a myriad of electronic festivals to pick from. There is the VOLTT Koningsdag in about two weeks, which will include Undercatt, Young Marco, and Adam Beyer. There is the outdoor Awakenings Festival featuring Pan-Pot, Dave Clarke, and Maceo Plex.

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But no matter when you go, there will always be an event for any EDM fan to go to and have a great time.

Copenhagen

This may seem to be an odd choice, but Copenhagen belongs on this list. Danish people are some of the friendliest in Europe, and the city is small enough that it is easy to find your way around. But best of all, electronic dominates the music scene there. If you’re lucky, you may be able to hear the Pegboard Nerds or the Blue Foundation, some of the best electronic DJs in Denmark.

Copenhagen’s clubs are primarily in the Meatpacking District, and the crowds don’t show up until around midnight. But once they do, then head to the Culture Box, a club which has every kind of electronic music you could be interested in hearing.

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Ibiza

Copenhagen and Prague may be underrated, and Berlin and Amsterdam may be well known; but none are as famous just for their EDM scene as Ibiza. Ibiza is known for some of the top EDM events in the world like the International Music Summit and the Ultra Music Festival. You can always count on the best of the best DJs to come here to some of the best clubs in the world like Space Nightclub. And on top of it, when you’re not partying at night, you can enjoy the great weather and beaches during the day.

It should be noted that Ibiza is not for those with light wallets, though you can save money through hostels and buying tickets in advance. But if you can afford it, this is a terrific destination both for music and to party in general.

Featured photo credit: MIXTRIBE via flickr.com

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Last Updated on October 15, 2019

Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

Why we procrastinate after all

We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

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To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

So, is procrastination bad?

Yes it is.

Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

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The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

How bad procrastination can be

Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

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After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article:

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8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

Procrastination, a technical failure

Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

Reference

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