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New Alzheimer’s No-Drug Treatment Restores Full Memory Function

New Alzheimer’s No-Drug Treatment Restores Full Memory Function

The term “breakthrough” tends to be used loosely in the medical field, but a team of researchers at the University of Queensland might have a concrete breakthrough in curing Alzheimer’s Disease.

Alzheimer’s Disease affects roughly 50 million people worldwide and your chances of getting the disease increase with age. According to the Alzheimer’s Society, at the age of 65 Alzheimer’s Disease can affect 1 in 14 people. Over the age of 80, that rises to 1 in 6.

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According to medical experts, Alzheimer’s Disease has two causes. The first is a buildup of proteins called beta-amyloid, which hampers cell-to-cell communication, damaging and destroying brain cells in a few ways.

Another cause involves a protein called Tau. Tau proteins help in the transport of nutrients and other essentials throughout the brain system. Over time, Tau proteins can tangle up inside the brain cells, causing failure within the transport system and resulting in the destruction of brain cells.

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According to reports published in Science Translation Medicine, using a non-drug treatment, the team was able to use a non-invasive ultrasound, called a focus therapeutic ultrasound, to open up the blood brain barrier (a layer to protect the brain from bacteria) and was able to activate the Microglial cells. Functioning as waste removal cells, the Microglial cells were then able to perform their functions to clear out the beta-amyloid clumps that were responsible for severe Alzheimer’s Disease.

Although the medical technique was performed on mice, very positive results were shown. Reports of a FULL recovery of memory function were documented in 75% of tested mice, with no damage recorded to the surrounding brain tissue. The mice were recorded to have shown vast improvements in memory performance.

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To date, there have been no vaccines or preventive measures to stop Alzheimer’s Disease, but these results have been very promising for the team at the University of Queensland. With this new breakthrough, a cure for Alzheimer’s Disease may very well be on the horizon.

Featured photo credit: Brain Cells via hubpages.com

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Lim Kairen

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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