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When Is A Good Time To Refinance Your Student Loans?

When Is A Good Time To Refinance Your Student Loans?

Student loan debt. Those three words are more important to people in their 20’s and 30’s today than any prior generation. The cost of education has continued to rise alongside a growing expectation that most individuals seeking decent salaries should go well-beyond a high school diploma.

It’s increasingly common now to hear presidential candidates address student loans, and eventually one president will propose a comprehensive solution, especially as recent undergraduates and post-graduates begin their careers, start families, and, above all, become the primary voting bloc.

Federal Refinancing Isn’t An Option…Yet

One solution that has been proposed is a federal refinancing option. If you are unfamiliar with the term, refinancing essentially means getting a new interest rate and new repayment terms. Unfortunately, that doesn’t exist for federal student loans now, and may not for a while.

There are, however, many for-profit companies that offer refinancing for those with private loans, and for those with federal loans who are willing to go with a private company to get a lower interest rate.

Should I Refinance My Student Loans?

You may be one of those graduates wondering if now is the best time to refinance your student loans. The answer is both short and long: it depends. Refinancing could be a smart move, particularly for students who have private loans with high interest rates. Federal student loans can’t be refinanced with the government and therefore require you to go private.

Nevertheless, although you may successful lower your monthly payments, no private company offers the generous terms the government offered when you took out the loan. Remember, the federal government is a non-profit entity, whereas private lenders are for-profit.

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How To Determine If Refinancing Makes Sense

Figuring out whether refinancing makes sense at first requires a bit of math, but there are many sites out there that can help you see the different ways you can approach repayment.

If you think about your student loan as one large payment (with principal and interest included) instead of many monthly payments, it’s easier to understand why refinancing may be useful for some borrowers.

To put it simply – each month, interest on the loan is calculated and added to the principal. When you make a payment, you pay off the accrued interest plus a small portion of the principal. Sometimes, those with a particularly high interest rate can feel like they are paying and paying and their balance never seems to budge.

When that interest number goes down, the amount you owe is reduced a little as well. At the most basic level, the benefit of a lower interest rate is that, over the life of the loan, the total sum of all your payments will be smaller, thus saving you money.

Factors To Consider Before Refinancing

Once you know what your rate options are, how do you determine if now is the right time to refinance your student loans?

Employment

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First, you should take honest stock of your current employment status and your future earning potential. These are important factors, because refinancing and exchanging a federal loan for a private one can remove some flexibility in your payment schedule. Stability in a current position as well as the likelihood of a promotion with salary increases work in your favor when refinancing because they allow you to plan with confidence.

Terms and Conditions of the New Loan

If you feel like you could be laid off or terminated in the near future, or if you are seeking a career change, it might not be a great time to refinance. One way that a new set of terms could be less forgiving than your previous ones is that you might not have the forbearance or deferment option. Forbearance allows you to temporarily postpone or reduce your student loan payments.

Another factor may be that the lender requires a loan to be paid off in 10 years instead of 20. Even if you get a lower interest rate, the accelerated payments will result in a higher monthly expense.

Your Credit Score

When considering the option of refinancing your student debt, it is important to research your credit score. If you’re in a good credit score range, you will be eligible for the lender’s lowest interest rates and most generous terms. On the other hand, a bad credit score might force you to hold off until your credit is better.

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Fixed vs Variable Rates

Also, take some time to mull over your fixed versus variable rate options. Fixed rates are great if you lock in a low one, meanwhile variable rates are adjustable. Given that we are in a rising interest rate environment, your variable rate is likely to increase significantly over time, so it is best to focus on refinancing for the lowest rate possible.

Read The Fine Print

If you have federal loans, and refinancing them into private loans seems to make sense after the aforementioned considerations, be careful and read the small print. There are a number of programs and perks that came with your federal loans that don’t apply to private loans. These include income-based repayment and loan forgiveness.

For example, if you are employed by a non-profit and you are working toward complete loan forgiveness in 10 years, remember that once you refinance your federal students loans to become private, you will lose that opportunity. In fact, your current employer may even have a program to help pay off your student loans that you aren’t even using yet.

Long-Term Financial Goals

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After you do research and know your options, think about your 5 and 10 year plan, both personally and professionally. If you are in a place in your life where you anticipate some bigger purchases, such as a house, car, or business, you should factor those potential buying decisions into the equation. And don’t forget – it’s always best to start saving for retirement early, even if you have to invest with little money.

Similarly, marriage and children maybe critical elements of your future financial planning. The extra few hundred dollars a month that you might be putting toward student loan repayment might be better spent on a down payment for a home or toward saving for costs associated with a growing family.

Final Word

If refinancing makes financial sense for you, do it sooner rather than later. Each month that you pay your old, higher interest rate is another month that money could have been allocated to something else other than an inflated interest expense. If, after researching your options, you decide that refinancing your student loans might not be a smart move right now, there are still things you can do to make good financial decisions.

If you can afford it, pay more than your monthly payment. The more you can put toward prepayment, the more your principal will be reduced each month and the less you will pay in the long-term.

The choice of if or when to refinance student debt is a personal one. This decision is best made by weighing the pros and cons of all options. You can control some things in life, but not everything, like interest rates. With dedication to smart research and a bit of good timing, you could be on your way to a lower monthly payment that could save you thousands in student loan interest.

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Gary Dekmezian

Entrepreneur

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Last Updated on April 3, 2019

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

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Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

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It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

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6. Get Aggressive About It

Consider these points:

Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

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Finally (and most importantly)…

8. Keep Trying

Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

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Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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