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Interview Horror Stories from HR (plus, 5 tips)

Interview Horror Stories from HR (plus, 5 tips)

As May graduation is upon us many students will be entering the workforce for the first time. Even if you have been swimming in the work pool for a while, let’s face it, some of us can use all the interview help we can get.

So, before you find yourself getting jittery in an office lobby and sweating through the new suit mom and dad bought you, we decided to do a little interviewing ourselves and asked business owners and human resource professionals to share their insights on hiring new candidates.

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“Interviewing can be invigorating and fun when talking with a confident, qualified applicant that I can imagine contributing towards the team and the business. On the other hand, an applicant that didn’t take the time to prepare or is disrespectful is one of the biggest tests to my patience”, said Martin Chan, President of Viogee, Inc..

There are definitely some lessons to be learned from the horror stories of candidates past to help you from committing your own interview crimes.

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Here are 5 examples of what to do to land the job derived from stories of what NOT to do:

1. Be Prepared: Interview amnesia is a real thing and it’s one part funny, two parts off-putting for any employer.

  • Interviewer: How are you doing? My name is Martin and I’ll be interviewing you today.
  • Applicant: Nice to meet you Mark.
  • Interviewer: Uhh, it’s…Okay, have a seat.
  • Interviewer: So what interested you in our company?
  • Applicant: I’m sorry. What is the name of this company?
  • Interviewer: What would you like to invest your time into professionally?
  • Applicant: I don’t know. I applied to everything- which job is this again?

2. Polished Resume: A resume should accurately reflect who you are and what qualities you can bring to a company. Make sure it is your information.

I recently interviewed a candidate that used her daughter’s resume to get in the door because she thought it would be more relevant. I’ve heard about people lying on their resumes but to use a completely different person’s resume was a new all time low! Needless to say, she was not offered the position.

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3. Be Respectful: Interviewers look for someone that they can imagine interacting with their clients and customers- the language they use is important!

Unfortunately, it’s not uncommon for a candidate to bad mouth their previous employer. I interviewed a sharp looking guy who made a great initial impression. When I asked him what his previous employer would say about his work performance, he replied, “Honestly, we didn’t see eye-to eye. He was a bit of an ***. Sorry, I say it how it is.” Suddenly he didn’t seem so sharp; needless to say, we decided not to offer him the position.

4. Be Professional: First impressions are incredibly important and hiring managers want to be impressed!

The worst interview I ever conducted was rough from the start. After introducing myself, I asked how her drive to the office was. “It was awful”, she said. “I got so lost! I’m horrible at following directions!” Later in the conference room when I asked her what attracted her to apply she got very emotional. We finished the interview but I decided to spare my office the drama.

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5. Be Aware of non-verbals: What someone says is only one thing I consider- posture, eye contact, fidgeting, someone’s dress are just a few other things to take into account.

I’ll never forget interviewing a woman that had an impressive resume but zero personality. She avoided eye contact throughout the interview and spoke in a soft tone. When I asked her what would separate her from other applicants she awkwardly stared off into space, locked her purse into a death grip and all she could muster up was, “Ummmm, I don’t know”. I guess you really can’t judge a book by its cover.

Although these slightly terrifying stories are amusing they are real situations human resource professionals have encountered more than once. Remember that the most important aspect of interviewing is to find a great match for you and the company. Hopefully, keeping that in mind will help you find the self-confidence you need to sit up straight, look your interviewer in the eye and speak with poise.

Oh, and if the hiring manager asks you how your drive to the office was just say, “Great, thanks”, because you only have one chance to make a positive first impression and the answers you give will help you demonstrate yourself as being their next rockstar employee.

Featured photo credit: Viogee, Inc. via viogee.com

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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