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6 Tips for Personal Branding

6 Tips for Personal Branding

Personal branding essentially is how others view you. It is their impression of who you are. It is the image you portray to the world, especially the business world. Get used to hearing about it now because it will only grow in importance. It matters.

How can you begin to get noticed? If you want to move up that corporate ladder, land a better job, or just make a name for yourself, personal branding needs to be something you focus on. How others think of you is key in business. It could mean that you get the sale versus someone else, that you are looked at for that new position over someone else, or that you end up with a leg up on the competition.

The antithesis is also true. If others do not think of you at all in your business world, that is not good. They will not consider you for the promotion, you may not land that account, and your new business idea may flounder instead of prosper.

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Spending time on social media is no longer an option, it is becoming a necessity. You must update your social media regularly. This does not necessarily mean daily, but you must update it with your own personal goals in mind. Every picture posted of you is important. Every phrase is important. Every step in this process is important. It takes time. You cannot simply throw caution to the wind where your image is concerned. Here are a few ideas for you to consider when looking at your own personal brand.

1. Facebook: Don’t just hit the “Like” or “Laugh” emoji.

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    Use Facebook to your advantage, especially since HR Reps will look at this when hiring. Watch what pictures are there of you and how you are portrayed. You can alter your privacy settings to change who can see your photos — if you don’t currently do this, I suggest you start. Also, privately message people you know you need to stay in contact with. This can just be a small note from time to time. Keep your contacts informed so they don’t forget about you. Finally, watch what you share with others. Every share has a message that others will attach to you.

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    2. LinkedIn: Connect with others.

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      Use LinkedIn to connect with others you may have never had the opportunity to connect with. Connect with those in your line of work. Message professionals with experience and expertise to get their career advice. Many times, they are more than willing to share and help out. Also, any blogging or writing you do can be posted here too!

      3. Twitter: It’s not just for celebrities.

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        As you gather a following, others will take notice of what you are doing and saying as well as your interests. They will see who you follow as your influencers as well. Remember to keep this in mind constantly!

        4. Blogging: Set up a blog and get noticed professionally.

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          Get your name out there in your chosen field. It usually takes time to get going and get a following. I just recently started blogging myself. Give yourself a reasonable goal of one post per week or every two weeks. Remember to link your blog with your other accounts.

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          5. Write: Write about topics in your chosen field and get published.

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            Relevant articles that you write can be included in your resume. Again, link them to your other accounts.

            6. Website: Get a personal website.

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              This is for those really trying to get out there and be noticed. Again, it takes up time to focus on but can be worth it! A personal website (where you can also host your blog) can be the perfect place to put your personal image on display.

              photo credit: Pinterest

              Featured photo credit: Olu Eletu via unsplash.com

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              Last Updated on August 4, 2020

              The Gentle Art of Saying No For a Less Stressful Life

              The Gentle Art of Saying No For a Less Stressful Life

              No!

              It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

              But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

              What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

              But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here’s how to master the Gentle Art of Saying No:

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              1. Value Your Time

              Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”

              2. Know Your Priorities

              Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time?

              For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.

              3. Practice Saying No

              Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.

              4. Don’t Apologize

              A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.

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              5. Stop Being Nice

              Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets.

              Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.

              6. Say No to Your Boss

              Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no,” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning.

              But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.

              7. Pre-Empting

              It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting,

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              “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”

              8. Get Back to You

              Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them:

              “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.”

              At least you gave it some consideration.

              9. Maybe Later

              If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say,

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              “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].”

              Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.

              10. It’s Not You, It’s Me

              This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often, the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time.

              Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

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              Featured photo credit: Kyle Glenn via unsplash.com

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