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13 Safe Destinations For The Solo Female Traveler

13 Safe Destinations For The Solo Female Traveler

Traveling is a great opportunity to discover new places and people, but it’s also an opportunity to discover yourself – if you travel alone! Women can benefit a lot from traveling on their own, which increases their confidence and makes them more independent. However, many women are reluctant to travel solo due to perceived dangers. To help you out and allow you to reap all the great benefits of traveling alone, here are 13 safe destinations for the solo female traveler. Pack your heels and get out your selfie stick — adventure is just around the corner!

1. Iceland

Iceland is a top entry when it comes to safe destinations for the solo female traveler, both for its relaxed atmosphere and the unique, amazing scenery. The land of ice and fire, Iceland is truly safe for women. In Reykjavik, you can find a thriving nightlife and experience the local lifestyle, as well as the local music. Among the activities you can do in Iceland: hiking on a glacier, bathing in a lagoon, and snorkeling. Or, you can just enjoy your first digital nomading experience and start working on your projects from abroad.

2. Canada

You know what they say about Canadians: they are the friendliest people on earth. And it’s true, which makes Canada a great country to travel to first if you are still unsure about the whole solo travel thing. The people might be nice, but the weather is not always that nice, so make sure you pack with the climate and weather in mind!

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3. New Zealand

New Zealand is a land of adventure. It has wonderful landscapes and great opportunities for fun activities. You can fly in a sightseeing plane, hike the famous Routeburn Track, enjoy jetboating, ride a horse, take up paragliding, and the list goes on. If you are less sporty, you can just enjoy the breathtaking views of New Zealand and feed the wildlife, which is nothing like you’ve seen before.

4. The Scandinavian Trio

Sweden, Denmark, and Norway are all safe destinations for the solo female traveler, as well as rich in intricate architecture and with a distinct culture. You can check out museums which house a lot of viking artifacts, or simply enjoy life with the locals. Denmark has been designated as the happiest country in the world.

5. Thailand

You always hear a lot about Thailand, but you won’t hear a bad thing about single female travelers. This is because Thailand is one of the safe destinations for the solo female traveler. The beaches, the food, and the scenery are great, and you can enjoy a little pampering: there are many affordable resorts you can check out.

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6. Costa Rica

Costa Rica was made for surfers: those pristine beaches and the perfect waves just ask for it! This is a perfect destination for a solo traveler because it offers something for every type of traveler: you can enjoy a safari, you can go swimming, or you can just sunbathe on the white-sand beaches.

7. Ireland

Irish people will never ask you anything, won’t poke you, and won’t disturb you. You can join them and share in their happiness, the nuts, and the comments on the footballs — just don’t share your black beer! This is something to savour alone, just like your trip to Ireland. The countryside is also filled with goodies, so make sure you check it out.

8. The Netherlands

The Netherlands, especially Amsterdam, is known for its liberty and the super-chill lifestyle. Despite the notoriety of the country, you can safely enjoy your solo trip as you explore the canals and take a bike ride along the endless flower fields.

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9. Bali

Bali has a culture of backpack travelers and is used to seeing solo people wandering around. Women are safe as they enjoy the serene temples, the cheap accommodations, and the food — which is also amazing! The locals are also very friendly. And there is more: Bali is the ultimate romantic escape destination, so you won’t be alone for long (unless you want to be!).

10. Singapore

Singapore is like Disneyland: once there, you feel nothing can go wrong. And this is the reality, as it is the second-safest country in Asia, after Japan. Despite being small, Singapore has a lot to offer: from sun to amazing infrastructure, which allows you to travel across the entire land. However, there’s one drawback: Singapore is quite expensive.

11. South Korea

South Korea is a friendly nation. This beautiful small country is a real gem: South Korea has a wonderful wildlife, lush forests, a high-tech culture, and a vivid nightlife. Besides, the prices are so low, you can get away with a budget trip.

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12. Austria

Austria is another safe European country where you can go alone to discover the Alps and enjoy Skiing or study the intricate architecture. Being the homeland of Princess Sissi, you can also try lady-style horseback riding. When you are done exploring, you can hang out in a coffee house and decide on which theater play to go watch.

13. Bhutan

Bhutan is a lovely green paradise where women are treated with respect, which makes it great for a solo female traveler. The Buddhist country is rich in temples and bright flags, as well as smiling people who will be always eager to help you get around — especially when you are a damsel in distress. Enjoy the stay and the inexpensive accommodations and food as you spend your time visiting the Folk Museum and the Botanical Garden.

Featured photo credit: Brooke Saward via google.com

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Last Updated on September 28, 2020

The Pros and Cons of Working from Home

The Pros and Cons of Working from Home

At the start of the year, if you had asked anyone if they could do their work from home, many would have said no. They would have cited the need for team meetings, a place to be able to sit down and get on with their work, the camaraderie of the office, and being able to meet customers and clients face to face.

Almost ten months later, most of us have learned that we can do our work from home and in many ways, we have discovered working from home is a lot better than doing our work in a busy, bustling office environment where we are inundated with distractions and noise.

One of the things the 2020 pandemic has reminded us is we humans are incredibly adaptable. It is one of the strengths of our kind. Yet we have been unknowingly practicing this for years. When we move house we go through enormous upheaval.

When we change jobs, we not only change our work environment but we also change the surrounding people. Humans are adaptable and this adaptability gives us strength.

So, what are the pros and cons of working from home? Below I will share some things I have discovered since I made the change to being predominantly a person who works from home.

Pro #1: A More Relaxed Start to the Day

This one I love. When I had to be at a place of work in the past, I would always set my alarm to give me just enough time to make coffee, take a shower, and change. Mornings always felt like a rush.

Now, I can wake up a little later, make coffee and instead of rushing to get out of the door at a specific time, I can spend ten minutes writing in my journal, reviewing my plan for the day, and start the day in a more relaxed frame of mind.

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When you start the day in a relaxed state, you begin more positively. You find you have more clarity and more focus and you are not wasting energy worrying about whether you will be late.

Pro #2: More Quiet, Focused Time = Increased Productivity

One of the biggest difficulties of working in an office is the noise and distractions. If a colleague or boss can see you sat at your desk, you are more approachable. It is easier for them to ask you questions or engage you in meaningless conversations.

Working from home allows you to shut the door and get on with an hour or two of quiet focused work. If you close down your Slack and Email, you avoid the risk of being disturbed and it is amazing how much work you can get done.

An experiment conducted in 2012 found that working from home increased a person’s productivity by 13%, and more recent studies also find significant increases in productivity.[1]

When our productivity increases, the amount of time we need to perform our work decreases, and this means we can spend more time on activities that can bring us closer to our family and friends as well as improve our mental health.

Pro #3: More Control Over Your Day

Without bosses and colleagues watching over us all day, we have a lot more control over what we do. While some work will inevitably be more urgent than others, we still get a lot more choice about what we work on.

We also get more control over where we work. I remember when working in an office, we were given a fixed workstation. Some of these workstations were pleasant with a lot of natural sunlight, but other areas were less pleasant. It was often the luck of the draw whether we find ourselves in a good place to work or not.

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By working from home we can choose what work to work on and whether we want to face a window or not. We can get up and move to another place, and we can move from room to room. And if you have a garden, on nice days you could spend a few hours working outside.

Pro #4: You Get to Choose Your Office Environment

While many companies will provide you with a laptop or other equipment to do your work, others will give you an allowance to purchase your equipment. But with furniture such as your chair and desk, you have a lot of freedom.

I have seen a lot of amazing home working spaces with wonderful sets up—better chairs, laptop stands that make working from a laptop much more ergonomic and therefore, better for your neck.

You can also choose your wall art and the little nick-nacks on your desk or table. With all this freedom, you can create a very personal and excellent working environment that is a pleasure to work in. When you are happy doing your work, you will inevitably do better work.

Con #1: We Move a Lot Less

When we commute to a place of work, there is movement involved. Many people commute using public transport, which means walking to the bus stop or train station. Then, there is the movement at lunchtime when we go out to buy our lunch. Working in a place of work requires us to move more.

Unfortunately, working from home naturally causes us to move less and this means we are not burning as many calories as we need to.

Moving is essential to our health and if you are working from home you need to become much more aware of your movement. To ensure you are moving enough, make sure you take your lunch breaks. Get up from your desk and move. Go outside, if you can, and take a walk. And, of course, refrain from regular trips to the refrigerator.

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Con #2: Less Human Interaction

One of the nicest things about bringing a group of people together to work is the camaraderie and relationships that are built over time. Working from home takes us away from that human interaction and for many, this can cause a feeling of loss.

Humans are a social species—we need to be with other people. Without that connection, we start to feel lonely and that can lead to mental health issues.

Zoom and Microsoft Teams meeting cannot replace that interaction. Often, the interactions we get at our workplaces are spontaneous. But with video calls, there is nothing spontaneous—most of these calls are prearranged and that’s not spontaneous.

This lack of spontaneous interaction can also reduce a team’s ability to develop creative solutions—there’s just something about a group of incredibly creative people coming together in a room to thrash out ideas together that lends itself to creativity.

While video calls can be useful, they don’t match the connection between a group of people working on a solution together.

Con #3: The Cost of Buying Home Office Equipment

Not all companies are going to provide you with a nice allowance to buy expensive home office equipment. 100% remote companies such as Doist (the creators of Todoist and Twist) provide a $2,000 allowance to all their staff every two years to buy office equipment. Others are not so generous.

This can prove to be expensive for many people to create their ideal work-from-home workspace. Many people must make do with what they already have, and that could mean unsuitable chairs that damage backs and necks.

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For a future that will likely involve more flexible working arrangements, companies will need to support their staff in ways that will add additional costs to an already reduced bottom line.

Con #4: Unique Distractions

Not all people have the benefit of being able to afford childcare for young children, and this means they need to balance working and taking care of their kids.

For many parents, being able to go to a workplace gives them time away from the noise and demands of a young family, so they could get on with their work. Working from home removes this and can make doing video calls almost impossible.

To overcome this, where possible, you need to set some boundaries. I know this is not always possible, but it is something you need to try. You should do whatever you can to make sure you have some boundaries between your work life and home life.

Final Thoughts

Working from home can be hugely beneficial for many people, but it can also bring serious challenges to others.

We are moving towards a new way of working. Therefore, companies need to look at both the pros and cons of working from home and be prepared to support their staff in making this transition. It will not be impossible, but a lot of thought will need to go into it.

More About Working From Home

Featured photo credit: Standsome Worklifestyle via unsplash.com

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