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4 Websites to Help Quit Your Job and Start a Business

4 Websites to Help Quit Your Job and Start a Business

Are you feeling trapped by a hum-drum job that leaves you unsatisfied and short of cash at the end of each month? Do you love solving problems, being creative, and being a hard-working, dedicated self starter who’s not afraid to get their hands dirty?

If that sounds like you, then it’s likely that starting a new business might be just the thing to inspire you to greater heights and ultimately put you in control of your own destiny. But starting a new business is not all that easy, and often comes with substantial financial risks that can leave you penniless, or even in debt.

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    Luckily, there is plenty of great advice out there to help guide you through those all important first steps. By empowering yourself with the insights, creativity and knowledge provided by our top 5 list of sites for entrepreneurs, you’ll be able to:

    1. Reduce the amount of time it takes to find and validate a fantastic idea
    2. Research and build a top class business plan
    3. Build a cutting edge, responsive website
    4. Promote and market your business like a pro
    5. Know which software, tools & services are available to increase productivity and cut costs
    6. Understand tax, financial, legal and industry rules and regulations
    7. Work efficiently with your money

    Sound good?

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    Each of the sites listed here has a focus on at least one, sometimes more, of the above listed points. It’s important to remember that almost no single website will give you all the answers you need in one place. I suggest spending some time browsing through all of them to build up your own broad and deep understanding of the challenges that lie ahead.

    Bplans

    Bplans offers free business plan samples and templates, business planning resources, How-to articles, financial calculators, and industry reports.

      Bplans offers an incredible range of business plan templates, advice about how to research and create plans, and insights into finding funding, selling, and pitching during the startup phase.

      Have it bookmarked from the time you have an idea, until the time the business is established and out of the startup phase.

      Along with their vast selection of free downloadable plans and templates for virtually any type of business imaginable, they also have a decent blog and lots of in-depth, useful guides on a range of startup related topics. In particular, you’ll find the following guides of great use:

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      ThePennyHoarder

      The world's largest personal finance blog with 5+ million monthly readers.

        ThePennyHoarder, unlike the other sites in this list, is not really focused on business per se, rather on personal finance. But, what they do bring to the table is a huge variety of creative money hacks and advice for small business owners and entrepreneurs.

        Ideas to stretch or save a dollar that you wouldn’t think of in a million years are part of their daily routine, which is super useful if you’re having to bootstrap a startup without funding or loans to keep things afloat.

        In addition to plenty of information focused on working from home, they also have lots of budgeting tips and even coupons available to help save money when it counts the most.

        Here’s where I recommend you start:

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        SBA

        An electronic gateway of procurement information for and about small businesses.

          The SBA (Small Business Administration) is a U.S. government run resource aimed at helping small business owners and entrepreneurs navigate the complex world of tax, finance, grants, loans, contracts, commerce, government rules, and business legislation. Basically anything you might need to know about your business and industry’s regulatory environment.

          Use this site as a companion from start to finish. It’s not only useful for learning about complex rules and regulations, it can also help you find tax breaks and incentives, make connections with other entrepreneurs and business people, and make full use of the local, state and federal resources available to you.

          For my money, the most useful aspects of this site are the following:

          Entrepreneur

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          Advice, insight, profiles and guides for established and aspiring entrepreneurs worldwide.

            Entrepreneur is arguably the world’s leading online resource for entrepreneurs because, in addition to all the standard guides and advice you would expect from a leading business resources, they also offer something more… real-world insight. Their reach and reputation is such that they can get the inside scoop on news, developments, leaders, influencers, and trends that allow them to get valuable business related insight into your hands earlier than other sites.

            If staying on trend is vital to the survival of your business, then Entrepreneur is the site to bookmark right away.

            Entrepreneur’s site is also so massive that it likely covers every bit of information you could possibly need. The downside is that because much of their content is contributed by third parties, it isn’t always easily discovered or presented in a uniform manner. With that said, there are a few stand out pages that you definitely need to check out:

            So those are my top 5 sites that will help you realize your dreams of leaving the rat race and taking control of your own destiny by building the business of your dreams. Of course, these sites aren’t the only game in town. What resources do you find useful? Share your suggestions in the comments.

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              photo credit: Pinterest

              Featured photo credit: Christian Dembowski via flickr.com

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              Last Updated on April 25, 2019

              How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

              How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

              Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

              Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

              A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

              3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

              Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

              Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

              One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

              Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

              • What’s your ideal work environment?
              • What’s most important to you right now?
              • What type of people do you like to work with?
              • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
              • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
              • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
              • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

              Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

              The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

              Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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              What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

              Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

              What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

              Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

              Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

              Step 3: Read the Job Posting

              Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

              When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

              5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

              The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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              Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

              1. Contact Information and Header

              Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

              Example:

              Jill Young

              Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

              2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

              This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

              Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

              Example:

              Qualifications Summary

              • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
              • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
              • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

              3. Work Experience

              Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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              How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

              For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

              Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

              Example:

              Work Experience

              Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

              YourLocalTheater

              • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

              4. Education

              List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

              Example:

              Education

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              • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
              • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

              5. Other Activities or Interests

              When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

              Example:

              Other Activities

              • Mentor, Pathways to Education
              • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

              Bonus Tips

              Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

              • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
              • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
              • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
              • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
              • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

              The Bottom Line

              It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

              Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

              Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

              More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

              Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

              Reference

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