Advertising
Advertising

Medicine and Technology: 5 Medical Websites You Can Trust

Medicine and Technology: 5 Medical Websites You Can Trust

One of the first things that a doctor says is to “avoid looking for medical information online,” and basically, they’re right. We can’t trust what the internet shows, we become worried when we read fake information which usually makes us take the wrong decisions which can affect our body. We start getting influenced or convinced about what we read and we start feeling sick due to the information we viewed that probably has no medical fundaments at all.

Health will always be a priority so, first of all, you need to consult your doctor and be preventive, besides that, if you want to find reliable health information online you need to identify what are you especially looking for, trying to consult those websites with domains include an https , .org , .gov , .edu or .com, the author of the article you found, the date (also very important) and what does the website says about itself.

Advertising

Here are 5 medical websites you can trust:

MedlinePlus

As a website recommended by the US National Library of Medicine , MedlinePlus contains accessible, clear and strong information about health topics, including drugs, supplements and disorders. To make everything didactic, you can find a “videos, tools & games” section to improve your knowledge with interactive forms.

Advertising

MayoClinic

A nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education, this website is ranked as the number #1 HealthCare Leader with major campuses and locations in several states in the country. In this site you can’t just find medical information, you will also be able to make appointments, find doctors, search for publications and products. With the motto “Helping to set a new standard in care for people everywhere” this clinic/hospital has been bringing people easy medical access. Instead of randomly trying to find what a physical symptom means, you can consult its useful Symptom Checker.

FamilyDoctor

Operated by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), which is a national medical organization representing more than 120,900 family physicians, it’s an easy and complete site where you can find sections on diseases, symptoms, prevention (exercise, nutrition, sexuality for kids, teens, adults and seniors) and interactive tools like a Dictionary, BMI Calculator or questionnaires. All of the information on this site has been written and reviewed by physicians and patient education professionals at the AAFP.

Advertising

National Cancer Institute

The number of cancer victims has grown over the last years. We all have been facing it and its reasons depend on multiple factors (our lifestyle, genetics, DNA and exposure to viruses). This website contains many resources about this disease like prevention, types of, news and publications and a private telephonic line or live chat.

WebHealthCentre

A web portal that offers online medical consultation based on tools and resources showing complete information about symptoms and diseases, healthy living, health calculators & records, etc. You can also be part of its community and get support while sharing information and talking to other members.

Advertising

There are other authority sites with variety content that help you to find the best medical information with articles on that topic, like HuffingtonPost, NY Times, Abc News, Cnn, etc.

With this, we can see that the Internet has become such an amazing tool for finding a vast amount of information without having to leave the comfort of your home. However, despite these credible sites on this list, it is still recommendable that you go to a doctor to get yourself checked. No matter what the Internet tells you and even if it seems to cover all information to make sure what kind of symptoms you have or don’t have, nothing beats going to a doctor to make sure 100% of everything.

Featured photo credit: Mike Caputo via flic.kr

More by this author

16 Young And Successful Entrepreneurs Who Prove That Age Is Nothing but a Number This Is The Secret Recipe For A Healthy Living 6 Essentials You Need to Consider Before Starting an Online Business 4 Things Every True Leader Wants You to Know Life Insurance: A Secure Way To Protect Your Future.

Trending in Science

1 Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science 2 Science Says Screaming Is Good For You 3 Weighted Blanket for Anxiety and Insomnia: How to Make It Work 4 Scientists Discover Why You Should Take Off Your Shoes Before Entering Your Home 5 Science Says Piano Players’ Brains Are Very Different From Everybody Else’s

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on September 10, 2018

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

Advertising

Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

Looking at images of loved ones

While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

Advertising

In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

Advertising

Exercise

Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

Meditation

Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

Advertising

In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

Reference

Read Next