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You’ll Remember These 10 Things If You Grew Up As A Gamer

You’ll Remember These 10 Things If You Grew Up As A Gamer

If you consider yourself a gamer, chances are you grew up as one as well. And you probably have a lot of fond memories of the games you played as a child. If you are anything like me, you even consider some of the games you played to be a major influence on who you’ve become.

Anyway, your childhood was the one phase of your life when every single one of your friends played video games too. They were good times, I know. And there are probably some things more than others that you remember from this time. Here are some things you probably remember if you grew up as a gamer.

1. ROM cartridges

There is no way anybody, gamer or not, who grew up in the 80s or 90s can’t remember these babies. What you, a gamer, should remember is that you probably had a whole box of these. Some of these claimed to carry 9999 games in them, and regardless of the fact that they unfortunately never actually did, you spent hours playing all the games that they did carry.

Super Mario, Ninja Turtles, Duck Hunt, and Mortal Kombat were some of the best games you ever played. If you’re an avid gamer like me, chances are you still have a few of these lying around somewhere in your old bedroom!

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2. The Game Boy

Admit it. This was once your most prized possession. Every gamer owned a Game Boy in the early 90s and, coincidentally, this is also probably when gaming became a full-time thing for you.

You took it everywhere — to school, to church, to the mall, and many times this got you in trouble. Ah, memories! The first Game Boy was an 8-bit handheld video game device developed and manufactured by Nintendo. It was a part of the 4th generation of video game consoles. You probably owned a few more of the successors, including the Game Boy Color and the Game Boy Advance.

3. Doom

Whoa! It’s been 22 years since the first Doom came out and how could I fail to include this monster on the list. Doom, in many ways, revolutionized video games. Every gamer played this game growing up and it was the best thing ever.

In the 80s, video games were primarily targeted at kids, but as these kids grew older in the 90s, they were still playing games. Doom, when it came out, particularly targeted this audience. Finally, video games weren’t just a kid thing. So we owe more to Doom than we give credit for. Who’s stoked about the latest instalment coming out this year?

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4. Prince of Persia

Another thing every gamer remembers is playing Prince of Persia in the 90s. Originally released for the Apple II in 1989, it was soon ported to most consoles and to the PC in the early 90s — and then virtually every computer had this game.

It was my first PC gaming experience and I still remember playing this for hours on my dad’s old computer. Since then, the game has obtained legendary status, spawning a franchise of movies, 3D games, and more.

5. Brick games

Who hasn’t played these at least once in their lives? This was the mobile game of the 80s. Kids spent as much time on this back then as they do now on their mobile phones. And some consoles held 100 different brick games in one, the most popular of them being (of course) Tetris.

Personally, I’ve owned a Game Boy since I was 5, but I stumbled across my older brother’s (another gamer) old hand-held brick game once and remember being hooked on it for a while. It’s a thing every gamer, regardless of what generation they belong to, remembers.

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6. “Don’t put on too many games or you’ll break the computer.”

Oh, the endless quarrels you’ve had with your parents over using the computer for games. That’s something today’s kids will never understand. Computers were actually a lot more expensive back then. They were also a lot more prone to failure than they are now.

Every gamer my age can remember at least a few arguments they’ve had with their parents concerning games and the home computer. Sometimes, I even think I take what I have now for granted. Boy, the younger me would love to own his own PC and put all the games he wanted on it.

7. Games on a floppy drive

Anyone else remember carrying tons of games on a 1.44 MB floppy drive? You tell this to any modern kid gamer and he’ll laugh his pants off. But we old-schoolers do remember this. This was one of those experiences only the most avid amongst us had.

Not everyone used floppy drives to carry around games. But boy oh boy, did we love one with “Games” written on the label. I carried a lot of games on these back in the day. Mind you, this was back in simpler times when games didn’t really require the complicated installation processes they do today.

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8. Multiplayer gaming with one keyboard

This is another classic experience that only old-school gamers will remember: multiplayer gaming on a single computer. We’d split halves of the keyboard for controls. One would choose the arrow keys and the other would go with WASD.

Depending on the game being played, the screen might also be split. We’d wreak havoc on our halves of the keyboard trying to beat the opponent. Not too many people remember this, and it’s hard for some gamers to remember when you have the best gaming keyboards that you can have for yourself these days. But the most avid amongst us have definitely had the experience — and boy was it incredibly fun!

9. LAN Parties

LAN parties do still exist, but only gamers remember having these back in the 90s or 2000s. Most multiplayer gaming these days occurs though servers and, in a way, this has made the whole experience a lot more convenient. There’s still nothing quite like carrying your computer to your friend’s house, sitting it next to their computer, connecting them with LAN cables, and battling it out. This was mostly before the Internet took over, but it still makes for a lot of fond memories.

10. Faulty CDs/DVDs

Oh, these were the arch nemesis of all gamers of my generation growing up: faulty CDs/DVDs. Be it in your PC or your console, you’ve had a few bad experiences with a faulty disk. I once kicked my PlayStation 2 — that must be my worst experience associated with crappy CDs.

I’ve snapped a lot of these faulty CDs/DVDs in my day too. Luckily, they’ve gotten a lot better these days, and most games offer a digital download option. So, we can safely say that the days of faulty CDs/DVDs are behind us. But nevertheless, it’s an experience every gamer has had growing up and something they will never forget.

Featured photo credit: Wikimedia via upload.wikimedia.org

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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