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You’ll Remember These 10 Things If You Grew Up As A Gamer

You’ll Remember These 10 Things If You Grew Up As A Gamer

If you consider yourself a gamer, chances are you grew up as one as well. And you probably have a lot of fond memories of the games you played as a child. If you are anything like me, you even consider some of the games you played to be a major influence on who you’ve become.

Anyway, your childhood was the one phase of your life when every single one of your friends played video games too. They were good times, I know. And there are probably some things more than others that you remember from this time. Here are some things you probably remember if you grew up as a gamer.

1. ROM cartridges

There is no way anybody, gamer or not, who grew up in the 80s or 90s can’t remember these babies. What you, a gamer, should remember is that you probably had a whole box of these. Some of these claimed to carry 9999 games in them, and regardless of the fact that they unfortunately never actually did, you spent hours playing all the games that they did carry.

Super Mario, Ninja Turtles, Duck Hunt, and Mortal Kombat were some of the best games you ever played. If you’re an avid gamer like me, chances are you still have a few of these lying around somewhere in your old bedroom!

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2. The Game Boy

Admit it. This was once your most prized possession. Every gamer owned a Game Boy in the early 90s and, coincidentally, this is also probably when gaming became a full-time thing for you.

You took it everywhere — to school, to church, to the mall, and many times this got you in trouble. Ah, memories! The first Game Boy was an 8-bit handheld video game device developed and manufactured by Nintendo. It was a part of the 4th generation of video game consoles. You probably owned a few more of the successors, including the Game Boy Color and the Game Boy Advance.

3. Doom

Whoa! It’s been 22 years since the first Doom came out and how could I fail to include this monster on the list. Doom, in many ways, revolutionized video games. Every gamer played this game growing up and it was the best thing ever.

In the 80s, video games were primarily targeted at kids, but as these kids grew older in the 90s, they were still playing games. Doom, when it came out, particularly targeted this audience. Finally, video games weren’t just a kid thing. So we owe more to Doom than we give credit for. Who’s stoked about the latest instalment coming out this year?

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4. Prince of Persia

Another thing every gamer remembers is playing Prince of Persia in the 90s. Originally released for the Apple II in 1989, it was soon ported to most consoles and to the PC in the early 90s — and then virtually every computer had this game.

It was my first PC gaming experience and I still remember playing this for hours on my dad’s old computer. Since then, the game has obtained legendary status, spawning a franchise of movies, 3D games, and more.

5. Brick games

Who hasn’t played these at least once in their lives? This was the mobile game of the 80s. Kids spent as much time on this back then as they do now on their mobile phones. And some consoles held 100 different brick games in one, the most popular of them being (of course) Tetris.

Personally, I’ve owned a Game Boy since I was 5, but I stumbled across my older brother’s (another gamer) old hand-held brick game once and remember being hooked on it for a while. It’s a thing every gamer, regardless of what generation they belong to, remembers.

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6. “Don’t put on too many games or you’ll break the computer.”

Oh, the endless quarrels you’ve had with your parents over using the computer for games. That’s something today’s kids will never understand. Computers were actually a lot more expensive back then. They were also a lot more prone to failure than they are now.

Every gamer my age can remember at least a few arguments they’ve had with their parents concerning games and the home computer. Sometimes, I even think I take what I have now for granted. Boy, the younger me would love to own his own PC and put all the games he wanted on it.

7. Games on a floppy drive

Anyone else remember carrying tons of games on a 1.44 MB floppy drive? You tell this to any modern kid gamer and he’ll laugh his pants off. But we old-schoolers do remember this. This was one of those experiences only the most avid amongst us had.

Not everyone used floppy drives to carry around games. But boy oh boy, did we love one with “Games” written on the label. I carried a lot of games on these back in the day. Mind you, this was back in simpler times when games didn’t really require the complicated installation processes they do today.

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8. Multiplayer gaming with one keyboard

This is another classic experience that only old-school gamers will remember: multiplayer gaming on a single computer. We’d split halves of the keyboard for controls. One would choose the arrow keys and the other would go with WASD.

Depending on the game being played, the screen might also be split. We’d wreak havoc on our halves of the keyboard trying to beat the opponent. Not too many people remember this, and it’s hard for some gamers to remember when you have the best gaming keyboards that you can have for yourself these days. But the most avid amongst us have definitely had the experience — and boy was it incredibly fun!

9. LAN Parties

LAN parties do still exist, but only gamers remember having these back in the 90s or 2000s. Most multiplayer gaming these days occurs though servers and, in a way, this has made the whole experience a lot more convenient. There’s still nothing quite like carrying your computer to your friend’s house, sitting it next to their computer, connecting them with LAN cables, and battling it out. This was mostly before the Internet took over, but it still makes for a lot of fond memories.

10. Faulty CDs/DVDs

Oh, these were the arch nemesis of all gamers of my generation growing up: faulty CDs/DVDs. Be it in your PC or your console, you’ve had a few bad experiences with a faulty disk. I once kicked my PlayStation 2 — that must be my worst experience associated with crappy CDs.

I’ve snapped a lot of these faulty CDs/DVDs in my day too. Luckily, they’ve gotten a lot better these days, and most games offer a digital download option. So, we can safely say that the days of faulty CDs/DVDs are behind us. But nevertheless, it’s an experience every gamer has had growing up and something they will never forget.

Featured photo credit: Wikimedia via upload.wikimedia.org

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Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on September 18, 2020

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

1. Exercise Daily

It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

3. Acknowledge Your Limits

Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

The basic nutritional advice includes:

  • Eat unprocessed foods
  • Eat more veggies
  • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
  • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

    5. Watch Out for Travel

    Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

    This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

    If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

    6. Start Slow

    Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

    If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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    7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

    Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

    My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

    If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

    I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

    Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

    More Tips on Getting in Shape

    Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

    Reference

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